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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,650

    Default

    You have gone the distance...and then some...for this mare. Option 1 is humane. Wish everyone had a fraction of your caring.....


    6 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2001
    Location
    va
    Posts
    1,000

    Default

    Another strong vote for option #1. Too many things could go terribly wrong in trying to make a move. You would feel horrible if she were stressed or injured in transit. A peaceful crossing that you can control is a much better choice. {{{HUGS}}}


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,551

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    Also agree with option #1. I boarded an elderly gelding that had some sort of neurological incident (never conclusively determined what happened) that left him somewhat ataxic for the last several months of his life. As a (backyard) barn owner, I did as much as I could to keep him comfortable and safe, but I was terrified for his safety. Every morning I looked out the window as I got out of bed just wondering if he was up, or down, or in distress. Even though he was still able to manage the status quo, I knew how vulnerable he was. He could trot and canter (awkwardly) but he did things like step on his own legs and cause big, long abrasions, because his balance was not very good. Just something small like that could have resulted in a big infection, so without good care, it could be a big problem.

    I would have been unwilling to allow him to be trailered, only for his own safety, and ultimately he was euthanized on my farm and buried. I was very sad to lose him, but was so relieved I didn't have to deal with an emergency situation, which would have been very possible, given the circumstances.

    Do not regret giving your horse a planned, safe and dignified end in comparison to an emergency or distress situation.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,431

    Default

    I would go with option #1, but I'd do as someone pointed out and wait for the actual closure notice, or plan to euth her some beautiful day this Fall and give her a really good day.

    Last year we took my MIL's very elderly cat when she moved. She wouldn't euth him, so we had him at home and he never really did bounce back from having to have shots, getting moved etc. I don't think he really suffered, but he didn't thrive, quit eating, and lasted only a couple of months before we had to euth him ourselves.

    We have their fates in our hands, sometimes an easy death is a gift we can give them.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2007
    Location
    SE CT
    Posts
    1,008

    Default

    I'd also go with option #1...Another thing to consider if you move her to another farm is who is going to handle her as far as staff.

    My sister's horse, at 27, also had some neuro issues going into the Fall last year. She was boarded here, and either my sis or myself handled her. One day another person visiting (had horse experience) decided to help bring the horses in with my sister, and complained how the horse was "lurching" into their personal space, until my sis explained the situation. She was ready to correct the horses lack of "manners".

    If your mare can only turn in one direction, etc., she must be handled with care. Otherwise the handler could be hurt if she falls or stumbles into them, or worse, abused in some way if a worker is unaware of her issues. Not saying that will be the case, but it is always a possibility.

    I also think the possibility of a new turnout situation, which has been mentioned, is of concern. She might have a hard time being introduced to other horses, unless you are assured she will ALWAYS have a private turn out.

    Not any easy decision, {{{hugs}}}



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,447

    Default

    I would do my best to try for Option #2, but if that didn't work, I'd go for Option #1--eighteen hours on a trailer for a horse who didn't like it BEFORE they had an issue standing for so long is just a lot to ask. There is nothing wrong with 1 or 2, and no reason to feel guilty whatever you decide--nine years is a long retirement. Go with what you think is best.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    11,849

    Default

    Another for the Option 1.
    She has had a lovely long life. I cannot see risking her safety and stressing her out with a long trailer ride at her age and with her problems.
    Spend a lovely day with her, Arrange it so after several hours the vet arrives and she crosses the rainbow bridge with you. Believe me I know how hard it is.
    But it is the right thing. In the long run you will know you did the right thing.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,695

    Default

    I'm also in the Option 1 Camp. A nice day, lotsa yummies and scritches.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,911

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    I think option one is your kindest choice.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,191

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    Another in favor of option one.

    A friend put down a 27 year old retired TB who had arthritis issues. Difficulty in getting up and down, but still able to run out to the grass on a spring day. She decided that it was cruel to put him thru another Michigan winter with an issue that would only get worse. How much pain is too much pain? A little, making it hard to get up? Wait until there's so much pain, he's lame?

    She opted for a beautiful fall afternoon and let him go when his pain was still minimal. We miss the old boy but are glad he never suffered.

    Sending you hugs, jingles and prayers.
    Ride like you mean it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,469

    Default She's old and she's been on that farm for a long time

    Even a "healthy" older horse of that age would be stressed with the move. Add the health issues and the odds of her adjusting are just about nil.

    You've given her a wonderful retirement. You have nothing to feel bad about.

    I'm going with the pick a pretty summer day option.

    It's hard, but not as hard as hearing it went badly for her one day, and you're 1000 miles away.

    Hugs.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,521

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    Another vote for number 1
    You've done right by this mare and I feel you would be doing right by her to let her go while she is happy and comfortable in her familiar home with familiar people and horses around her.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2005
    Location
    Southern California - Hemet
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    I think option 1 is a compassionate and responsible choice given the circumstances. Hugs to you and your mare.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    781

    Default

    Are you asking yourself the right question? (you don't have to answer, I'm asking to give you something else to think about)


    When my second horse was coming to the end of his life I was asking myself "Can I get him through another winter?" But it hit me one day that was the wrong question. Sure I probably could get him through another winter or two, but the question I needed to ask myself was "Should I push him through another winter?" I realized the answer to that question was no. He was getting weak in the hind end which made the winter ice a real risk. He'd lost weight. But he didn't deserve to be pushed, stressed, and propped up through another winter just because I wasn't ready to let him go.

    So are you asking yourself the right question? (((hugs)))


    5 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,464

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    I think the first option is the most humane and caring option. It doesn't mean that it won't be heartbreaking but she will pass on while she is still happy and healthy as opposed to the alternatives that could happen during transport.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    11,849

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    Please keep us posted. Sending jingles, You will make the right decision for the old girl.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    4,389

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    #1 seems to me to be the best option for your mare. I am so very sorry that you are having to make the decision. Keep your chin up, and kudos to you for having done your best for her through the years.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2008
    Location
    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
    Posts
    3,067

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    Every horse should be so lucky as to have such a caring owner. I agree with the many who recommend option 1 as being the most likely best choice. Condolences in advance for having to make that tough decision, though.
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,836

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    ((((HUGS))))

    This is never easy even when we know the answer. We all wish they would lay down peacefully and pass while sleeping when they are old and ready to move on. But we can make that happen for them, it's just not what we see on our end.

    My biggest worry for your mare would be the loss of her herd mates if you move her. I know how my horses are and they are SO attached to each other that alone would put them into a spiral.

    If I were you I would go love on her, give her treats and say goodbye. Have a friend take care of the rest so you don't need to be there for that.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,607

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    I'd go with option one. I wouldn't want to put her on a trailer in case she went down.

    I'm sorry.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



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