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  1. #1

    Default Trailering issues - any help would be great :)

    Hi

    sorry if this has been posted before but i am new to this forum.

    I have a wonderful gelding who showed/trailered all over with his previous owner, I purchased him from a lady who did not show him did not take him anywhere off the farm.

    My problem is I want to start showing him and he is awful to trailer, we have kinda gotten over his loading issues which began with walking on the trailer then running out followed by rearing and a general hissy fit, but now the issue is in the trailer he kicks the walls the whole time and works himself into a lather .............Has anyone had this happen before and suggestions would be great to get over it



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2013
    Posts
    406

    Default

    Are you able to desensitize him to the trailer? Feed him inside the trailer, load him lock the doors wait a few minutes then unload, working up to driving very short distances and then unloading working up towards long distances. Maybe trailer him to somewhere close where you can just hack out or trail ride for fun. It seems like he just needs some time to relax and get used to trailering again, associating it with something positive not necessarily a long ride/show.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I have started loading him and taking him around the block, but the entire time he is kicking. He wont eat at all in the trailer, the hay is never touched and I did try grain once and he wanted no part of it. It is very strange I have never had this issue before.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    I would start taking him on short trips around town. Like go to gas station. Come home. Got to a trail, ride, go home. Go to a trail and hand walk. Got to a trail, unload, hang out, load go home. Take a friend with him. Do the above. Etc. Feed treats when he is at gas station, if he is being patient. Also open the doors but not his stall door when you are stopped like at the gas station, or wherever it is safe to do so.

    To me it seems like he doesn't like the ride. He is being impatient. Once he learns that going somewhere can be fun or interesting or exciting he should settle down. Just takes time and consistency. This is what has worked for me.

    Always, always be very careful how you drive. Every trip with him he needs to have a good outcome.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2003
    Location
    Flint Hill, Virginia
    Posts
    2,569

    Default

    Often (unfortunately) the horse is saying not that he doesn't like 'trailers' but that he doesn't like *that one.*
    Try him in someone's open stock trailer, say, and see if it doesn't fix itself.
    * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,752

    Default

    I'd consider that he's uncomfortable in your trailer, or perhaps with your driving.

    I had a gelding who was terrible to trailer if he was locked into a slant or straight load spot, and would kick the ENTIRE ride. He kicked off his hind shoes, he kicked the mat off the ramp, he damaged a whole variety of trailers...he was terrible.

    But he was perfectly happy to travel loose in a stock trailer and would not kick at all.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default

    My trailer is a two horse bumper pull, straight load.

    I have used another trailer once with the same results.

    thank you for the thoughts



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
    Posts
    2,576

    Default

    He is just being impatient. Do some around town hauls and get him more used to being in the trailer and going somewhere. Just make sure you make it a pleasant trip, and come home. That is important to them I have found. I had one the same as what you are talking about. One pawed so bad in the trailer in a slant, he pulled up the rubber mats! He quit after going on short errands with me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
    Posts
    1,352

    Default

    Call Monty Roberts he seems to be able to get a wild mustang on U-haul in 5 minutes. Though there might be a lot of editing going on.

    I agree with Hunters Rest for a start. Have had a few that had no problem with Goosenecks and or vans but hated 2 horse bumpers. Having ridden with horses a time or two can’t say that I blame them. It’s always amazed me that they get back on one. Some horses just like humans can be claustrophobic. I assume you took the divider out? If you can borrow a gooseneck see how he does in that. Had a horse that was a PIA getting on and riding in a 2 horse. Parked it in his paddock and took the divider out, hung his feed bucket in it. Let him come and go as he pleased. Then started doing what others have suggested taking him on short road trips. And then longer ones. I always give the appropriate amount of Ace also. This is one of the many things it is for. And then back off.
    We have one horse an ex-chaser can jump the moon, nice horse. He was free to a good home but would not get on a 2 horse. Well, he would get on with a lot of effort and fall apart. Still have him 10 years latter. Hasn’t been out of his paddock in years until we took him over to a friends so I could renovate the paddock. Walked right on a gooseneck.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,752

    Default

    gumtree, I assume you mean a bigger or stock gooseneck. I have a two horse straight load gooseneck. Just because a trailer has a gooseneck hitch means absolutely nothing about how much space the horses have.

    Also, a note regarding feeding a horse in the trailer, since you did not mention this: it MUST be hooked up to the truck or blocked in back, or there's a chance the trailer will FLIP OVER with the weight of the horse. No one should EVER load a horse into a trailer (especially a small bumper pull) if it's not hooked up or blocked well.



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