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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2012
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    198

    Default Your opinions on these truck/trailer combos?

    Any thoughts on the following rigs?

    Okay, our truck is a pathetic (yet nearly brand new) half ton V6 with tow package GMC Sierra with a measly trailering capacity of 5,000lbs.

    I kind of thought trailering might be out of the question with it, but after doing some shopping...

    I've found a used Valley BP that weighs 2,200. My pony is only about 950 pounds but for ease of math, let's say two horses are 2,400 pounds -- that sneaks me under the wire at 4,600 pounds total.

    Also looking at Brenderup Prestige - a lighter trailer, which comes in at 4,000 loaded with 2 horses.

    The Valley is way cheaper, but I am concerned I am pressing it getting that close to my 5,000lbs limit. Hubby says no problem, but not because he's actually hauled that much with the truck before. I'm looking for other folks' advice/thoughts -- anyone hauled with this specific truck before?

    ETA I'm not looking to do any mountain climbing or cross country trips here, but do live in a place with moderate hills.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Where The Snow Flies
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    As a brenderup owner, I'd go with the Prestige. The brakes on these units are INCREDIBLE and will actually act like a parachute to pull your smaller vehicle to a stop. They are also incredibly stable. I pulled my Royal home empty, in a blizzard with 60-80 mph wind gusts through the mountains with my I6 Chevy Trailblazer. Even in all of that, the trailer didn't sway or pull me around. I was incredibly impressed with it. IMHO, I think you'll see the brenderup taxing your truck a whole lot less because it's light, has less tongue weight on the back of your truck and the weight distribution is a whole lot more stable in them than the traditional trailers.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2003
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    somewhere. out there.
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    Default

    I would worry about that truck pulling the Valley. I used to own an almost identical truck, but mine was a V8 and I pulled a trailer which was a little lighter than yours, usually with just one horse. It quite frequently felt under powered on hills...and not big ones. For a V6, go with the Brenderup which is specifically built for smaller vehicles.

    Some people will tell you that you can't tow with a half ton, but you can do it. Its just way harder on your vehicle.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Default

    I would also move fast on the prestige if you're interested. Used brederups are very hard to come by and don't stay for sale long. They also retain their value because they are highly sought after.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Default

    I would be very concerned, not so much with the truck, but with the V6. If you were just hauling your pony in a Brenderup easter egg and WD bars, you should be ok.

    With two horses, you might as well kiss your truck goodbye, particularly the engine, tranny and brakes (I speak from learning the hard way, bye bye $$$). It will annihilate your truck with the workload unless you are only towing, say 2x per year. Also, I would not put myself or my horse in a vehicle that close to its max numbers. I'm guessing hubby has never hauled horses before -- as you know, it's a whole nother animal than hauling a boat. I can whip our work boats around like nobody's business, they don't care, they don't lean, stomp their feet, slip, tapdance...or weigh a couple tons of high-centered gravity!

    And remember, it's not just horse weight -- water, tack, hay, stuff, YOU, things in the vehicle, they add more than you think, all of those will also be piled on to make the GCVWR, so I would worry very much about you and pony, especially once a semi blows by, you have to slam on the brakes for an idiot, there an issue on a hill, etc.
    Last edited by wildlifer; May. 1, 2013 at 10:01 AM. Reason: spellin


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildlifer View Post
    I would be very concerned, not so much with the truck, but with the V6. If you were just hauling your pony in a Brenderup easter egg and WD bars, you should be ok.

    With two horses, you might as well kiss your truck goodbye, particularly the engine, tranny and brakes (I speak from learning the hard way, bye bye $$$). It will annihilate your truck with the workload unless you are only towing, say 2x per year. Also, I would not put myself or my horse in a vehicle that close to its max numbers. I'm guessing hubby has never hauled horses before -- as you know, it's a whole nother animal than hauling a boat. I can whip our work boats around like nobody's business, they don't care, they don't lean, stomp their feet, slip, tapdance...or weigh a couple tons of high-centered gravity!

    And remember, it's not just horse weight -- water, tack, hay, stuff, YOU, things in the vehicle, they add more than you think, all of those will also be piled on to make the GCVWR, so I would worry very much about you and pony, especially once a semi blows by, you have to slam on the brakes for an idiot, there an issue on a hill, etc.
    You do not need weight distribution bars with a brenderup. They are already designed to have the weight evenly distributed over the axles of the trailer and reduce tongue weight. They are also extremely aerodynamic. I've hauled them empty on the highway and have no sway what so ever when semi trucks go barreling past me. Like I said, I hauled mine in 60-80 MPH cross gusts in a blizzard and I didn't get pushed around in my trailblazer. We've been cut off by people and when slamming on the brakes, the brenderup stays straight as an arrow and actually pulls the truck to a stop - like a parachute.

    For insurance, I did put in a very large auxillary transmission cooler and when the suspension eventually needed work (routine maintenance - truck has 200K on it) I did beef that stuff up on my truck. I would highly recommend at least the tranny cooler. Mine was $350 installed.

    If you are interested in more information on the Brenderups, take advice from people who actually own and haul in them. There seems to be a lot of ASSumptions made about them from people that have never hauled in one or even seen one.

    jn4jenny and IronwoodFarm have them. There are a few others. Just search brenderup on here and you'll find up. Most of us LOVE our trailers and would be happy to talk to you about them.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,755

    Default

    I have a Valley BP that is the same weight as the one you are looking at. (probably the same model) It's a 1995 model and I love it. It's not fancy but it's a safe, solid trailer.

    I pull it with a 1/2 ton V8 Suburban and my 15.2h horse is probably about 950 as well. That being said, I have only ever hauled one horse at a time and I don't go far. I'm not sure I would be comfortable with 2 horses unless they were both smallish.

    I have a WD hitch and it pulls great. However the times I have been on the highway with huge trucks going by I could feel some sway, so I am most likely going to have some anti-sway bars put on the next time I take it in.

    Everyone I have met with a Valley says they last forever - I'm very happy with it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
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    953

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    The brakes on these units are INCREDIBLE and will actually act like a parachute to pull your smaller vehicle to a stop.

    Surge brakes will not "pull" anything to a stop.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Dec. 19, 2008
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    They can and they do. I was in the F150 as my friend was hauling my trailer with her truck. Some yahoo cut us off when he pulled out of McDonalds and we had to slam on the brakes HARD to avoid hitting him. The inertia brakes engaged and we stopped in a shorter distance than she ever had with that truck. And, the roads were wet. We both were amazed. You could feel the trailer slow the truck down but it stayed straight as an arrow. Again, unless you've hauled a brenderup in those kinds of conditions, don't make assumptions.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
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    Default

    Well, they must defy the laws of physics then. It takes pressure against the hitch to activate the brakes. If the trailer pulled in any way, the brakes would come off.


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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2011
    Location
    Florida
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    Default

    Someones totally insane story of surge brakes causing a truck to stop doesn't convince me. I've driven a brenderup and very nice ride, great breaks, but no parachute effect. Im calling a little imagination on that no offense.

    I used to board with a woman who owned one, hence why I drove one once, and she pulled her two horse model with no dressing room with a ranger. I was a passenger many times dvds always felt safe. They haul really well. I would go with a brenderup or another european brand for your truck. Just the better choice imo.

    Good luck and happy trailer shopping.
    I am on my phone 90% of the time. Please ignore typos, misplaced lower case letters, and the random word butchered by autocowreck.




  12. #12
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    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    6,573

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by airhorse View Post
    Well, they must defy the laws of physics then. It takes pressure against the hitch to activate the brakes. If the trailer pulled in any way, the brakes would come off.
    This. Snowflake, I know you love your Brenderup, and that's fine, but let's stick to facts here. I have surge brakes on my trailer as well, and just the way they're working, they're not pulling anything to a stop.

    OP....I would really, honestly, seriously look into sizing up the vehicle before dumping money into an expensive trailer. You can stick to the half ton, but just by upgrading to a V8 you will be able to increase your towing capabilities and save money on the trailer.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2011
    Posts
    545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    You do not need weight distribution bars with a brenderup.
    True, and you actually are not supposed to use WDH with a trailer that has inertial brakes.

    OP, given the V6 engine, the Euro trailer is the better choice, despite the higher cost. But even there, moving up to a V8 (or at least an engine like the Ford Ecoboost V6) might be the better long-term choice.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2012
    Posts
    198

    Default

    Thanks everyone. I have been doubtful of the truck's capabilities, and your posts confirm that. I've scratched the Valley off my list. I'm still thinking about the Brenderup, but I will probably sit tight and stay home til I can afford to upgrade the truck.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    There seems to be a lot of ASSumptions made about them from people that have never hauled in one or even seen one.
    LOL. Well, if you don't like assumptions, don't ASSume people haven't used them. I have hauled with one (which did require seeing it). It wasn't for me and my horse was pretty crammed in there. Other people like them. That's fine, it's their money. I will take my extra money and do other things with it.

    Oh and yes, it is fine to love your trailer, but no, it cannot perform impossible feats, sorry. One size does not fit all, which is why there are so many types of horse trailers.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2003
    Location
    Cresco, PA
    Posts
    155

    Default

    FWIW, I had a GMC Envoy XUV (V6). For years I pulled a steel Adam stock trailer (3,000lbs) with it in the mountains. I wouldn't recommend it, but I didn't know any better when I bought it and the salesman assured me (Uh Huh), that I had enough pulling capacity (5400). Mostly it was ok. I didn't haul that often and when I did it was usually one horse. What really killed was hauling hay. (Didn't factor that in when I bought.) I hauled a lot of loads of hay that actually put me over the weight limit and it still continued to perform although some of those hills really taxed it.

    So if you have a good deal on the Valley maybe go for it and replace the truck when you can. If you're pulling small hills and flats seems like you'd be ok. Can you do a test run and see how your truck handles the load?

    Just some thoughts. Wish you luck!



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