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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2000
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    Memphis, TN USA
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    248

    Default IR pony too thin?

    My 15 year old Welsh pony is looking too ribby for my taste. He had foundered with a previous owner and is on a tsp. of Thyro-L and Quiessence daily. Do I need to reduce the dose? He has plenty of hay and some mini-pony feed twice a day. He has been boarded for the last 6 months, but I will get to take him to his new home at the end of May and can keep a close eye on him there.
    Last edited by JustFive; Apr. 30, 2013 at 01:27 PM. Reason: spelling



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    11,372

    Default

    Have they rechecked any of the levels recently? Is he on the thyro-L for true thryoid issues or just to bring weight down? (some vets will script it out just for the metabolic stuff even if there's no indication of thyroid insufficiency)

    I would get him tested before doing much else. See where things are at. These meds are not really designed (IME) to be given without regular monitoring.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Default

    To add to BuddyRoo, it's my understanding that not all IR horses are fat, you can have an IR issue in a horse that is at a "normal" weight or even be a hard keeper.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  4. #4
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Default

    Yeah IR can go either way.

    The fact that the pony was put on Thyro-L and Quiessence leads me to believe that previously the pony was on the plump side.

    But from a physiological standpoint, IR stuff can go both ways.

    Either they pack on the pounds OR the cells are not being given sufficient glucose due to lack of insulin or insulin response and thus they start starving.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2000
    Location
    Memphis, TN USA
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    248

    Default

    He is actually living at the vet who bred him, but I think I will have blood pulled when the Coggins is done and check his TSH levels.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Default

    I think that were I in your shoes, I'd do an ACTH and/or LDDS and then check the thyroid levels, but not sure I would jump straight to TSH. I doubt that the thyroid med was scripted out due to a low TSH in an IR situation. IR really (to my knowledge) has nothing to do with thyroid levels at all and TSH is a step up from the thyroid anyway.

    Very interesting that the critter is with a vet right now. When you say thin, what do you mean?
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    36,206

    Default

    IR has a lot to do with thyroid issues and can be one of the reasons they are fat. Many IR horses test to have "low thyroid" as a direct side effect of the metabolic issue. Getting the IT issues under control usually gets the thyroid back to normal.

    What feed is he on and how much?

    It is always a good goal to get off thyroid meds but you need to work with your vet for reducing or weaning off - don't ever just stop cold turkey
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2008
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    PA
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    Default

    If you are supplementing him with thyro-L, his TSH SHOULD be low. Lots of thyroid hormone = not much thyroid-stimulating hormone.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Former owner of the best Amish-carthorse-turned-eventer ever



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2008
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    Default

    Also, I think looking at a BCS chart and confirming he's too thin isn't a bad idea. Many horse people (and dog people, and cat people, and people people) have a distorted view of a "healthy" weight.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Former owner of the best Amish-carthorse-turned-eventer ever



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Default

    LOL, very good point cleo - it's amazing how many people look at certain horses (certain breeds especially) and think "omg you're starving that poor horse!" when in reality, he's at a great weight, they're just used to seeing fat ponies/fat drafts/fat QH's/etc. A "thin" pony is darling!
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



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