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  1. #1
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    Mar. 6, 2013
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    Default Darkening a honey colored Stubben

    Does anyone have an experience in this? What did you use and how did it work?

    I've seen other posts about darkening, but it seems that the Stubbens have a little bit of a wax coating to them. I am wondering if that will prevent the saddle from being darkened.
    Last edited by littlemess; Nov. 5, 2013 at 11:37 AM.



  2. #2
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    Are you talking about a Lohengrin? If so, and this is the "special leather", might be best to contact Stubben and ask what they recommend.



  3. #3
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
    Are you talking about a Lohengrin? If so, and this is the "special leather", might be best to contact Stubben and ask what they recommend.

    Sorry to break the news, but...
    I have owned three Lohengrins (I believe this is the only honey colored Stubben) and darkening CAN NOT BE DONE!!! The color looked aweful on my white TB!! I have go so far as to use black leather dye (tested on the underside) to no avail. The Lohengrin is a specially treated/sealed leather and will not darken or dye!!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  4. #4
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    Mar. 6, 2013
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    Default

    Ah! I think this is the most depressing thing I have heard in while. It's actually a Juventus, but appears to be the same leather as the Lohengrins.



  5. #5
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    Feb. 1, 2008
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    Default

    Yeah, I have a chestnut Roxane, and while the flaps have darkened nicely, the seat has only darkened where my butt goes (and I event, so it's gotten rained on/ oiled a LOT).



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
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    I've got a Honey colored Stubben Scout. It is darker than when I bought it but not really "dark" like Havana.

    Finished leather goods generally are the color that they are. I do some of my own leather work. I do some of my own dying; sometimes I buy leather that is the color I want. Leather is a porous material and “home dying” works reasonably well. Commercial processes put the color much deeper into the leather. They also use chemicals that “set” the color more consistently. The higher the quality of the goods the higher the probability that an attempt at color change will not be a happy event for either the item or the owner.

    I ride my Scout on a white gray horse. At least she’s white gray when she’s not re-dyed herself a “gray roan sorrel chestnut” with local mud. ? If I ever felt that the saddle color was such an unacceptable color combination that I had to use dye to correct it I’d buy the same brand and size saddle but in a different color.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Default

    My now 40+ year old Stubben Rex started light colored, then over the years is now a darker color from using Neatsfoot oil to Lexol on it.
    The leather is like new, soft and wonderfully full feeling.
    I am afraid that new processing techniques for leathers make the more old "natural" leather not the same, so it may not "age" and darken as well.

    Would it not make more sense to sell that saddle as is for someone that wants that color and get one the color you want?

    Trying to change a color considerably may end up with a muckely, many tone brown saddle with light patches here and there.

    Try asking Stubben directly, see what they recommend.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    ?? I darkened mine.
    I had one of those nappy orangy ones. I called the color Chestnut. Not sure the technical name though.
    It was a new model...not sure if the leather is different.

    But I took it from orange to a lovely havanna.

    I used Neats Foot Oil. Poured it in a measuring glass and put it in the microwave.
    It worked super easy.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    Would it not make more sense to sell that saddle as is for someone that wants that color and get one the color you want?.

    G.
    That would be the smart solution but I have found (besides in NZ) they only make this saddle in honey. I got a good deal on it and it's the only saddle I've found to fit myself and my broad mutton wither horse on a budget. I am not looking to invest a ton of money on a saddle since this horse is just a project. I guess I will try the warm neatsfoot. If it turns out terrible I won't be too sad.
    Last edited by littlemess; Nov. 6, 2013 at 02:15 PM.



  10. #10
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    Again, why not contact Stubben directly first? I have talked with them several times over the years and found them to be very helpful. I seem to recall a discussion with them awhile back that certain oils can affect their trees, but I'm not sure about that, it was quite a while ago and might matter depending on how many applications are made. Worth a phone call to be sure.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 6, 2013
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    Ok, I just sent Stubben an email, we shall see what they say.

    Purp - I love the wording "nappy orange" -- I couldn't agree more. It's a beautifully constructed saddle, but I don't know what they were thinking when then developed the honey color. Other then it looks good on chestnuts?



  12. #12
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    Default

    I received a response...they said to not use anything on it other then Stubben products...typical...



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by littlemess View Post
    I received a response...they said to not use anything on it other then Stubben products...typical...
    Of course, why didn't we think of that?

    When I got my Stubben four decades ago, I was at a show and didn't have time to do much more than get on and ride right then.
    It was the worst experience, that saddle was not broken in and slicker than riding on a live pig.

    I still don't know how I made it into the jump off, I was being shot out of the saddle practically every jump.

    Anyway, live and learn, never again ride when it counts on a new saddle.

    What did I do to it that evening?
    I practically soaked the poor saddle in the old Lexol, that left it, the horror, feeling like a wet noodle.

    Thankfully, by next morning it had mostly reabsorbed and was back to feeling like a normal saddle, if a bit darker.
    Some times, even being stupid, we get by without harm.
    I would not recommend you try a Lexol soak, just in case the newer saddles are allergic to it.


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  14. #14
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    Aug. 5, 2009
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    I think the color is kind of nice. Since you got a good deal on it, learn to live with it and the color will probably grow on you.


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  15. #15
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by littlemess View Post
    I received a response...they said to not use anything on it other then Stubben products...typical...
    Yeah, they only made it. What could they possibly know!

    There's all manner of home nostrums to "darken" leather. Some are benign (like tincture of time) some are not (like using burned motor oil). In all probability you're stuck with the color until in changes with time.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


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  16. #16
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    Mar. 6, 2013
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    Ok, I decided to do something about this saddle this weekend. It still needs some more "coats" but I think it looks pretty darn good.

    The color took very well in the seat and knee roll because it was that soft buttery leather. As for the back of the flap and flap covering the stirrup buckle that took some more tactful thinking. We used wetted 600 grade sandpaper and lightly rubbed it on those parts. You wouldn't believe how that color came off in a nasty steam of orange. We were constantly blotting it off with paper towels. The next day we mixed powder water soluble dye. I haven't oiled it yet, but I will and ride it in for awhile to see how it holds up.

    http://i40.tinypic.com/29cq3as.jpg



  17. #17
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    I see now why you wanted to do something, because the light color was so stained already.

    Will be interesting how the change works over time.

    With a saddle like that one looked, darkening made sense.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I see now why you wanted to do something, because the light color was so stained already.

    Will be interesting how the change works over time.

    With a saddle like that one looked, darkening made sense.
    Exactly! If it wasn't as spotty and worn I would have left it as it. It's a beautiful saddle.



  19. #19
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    Hopefully the saddle doesn't decide to burp any color back at you.



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