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  1. #81
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    Atr, holy cow!

    That reminds me of a family friend that came back from deer hunting with what appeared to be a cloven hoof shaped bruise on his forehead. It took quite a bit of nagging and some alcohol to get the story. He walked up to a fawn laying in the grass and mama deer came flying out of the woods, like a ninja, and knocked him flat, LOL! He came home empty-handed.
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran


    8 members found this post helpful.

  2. #82
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    Jan. 4, 2005
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    Washington State
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    While boarding, I took a header into a RR tie from a bolting horse (thanks, Murphy). I was wearing a helmet but still got knocked out for about 20 minutes before I was found. I had a nasty concussion, broken tailbone, and amnesia (that was the scariest!). The BO dragged me to the ER and while we were with the admitting nurse I announced that I had to go to the bathroom. The nurse said fine, the restrooms were just around the corner. I told her I would just wait to pee in the cup. That earned me a couple of blank stares. Made perfect sense to me though. You go to the doctor and they often take blood and urine samples. I just figured I'd multi-task.

    Just after I purchased my farm and moved the horses home I was paranoid that if I didn't feed them at precisely the same time every night they would have serious health issues (ha! got over that real quick). So....I was very late getting home from work one night and planned to start dinner by putting the potatoes on to boil while I ran out to feed. I was in such a hurry that I wasn't paying real close attention to what I was slicing with my brand new Cutco knife and took off the back of my thumb!

    I washed it, wrapped it, turned off the stove, fed the horses, and then drove myself 45 minutes to the nearest hospital while holding my hand above my head. The nurse helping the ER doctor turned out to be a horse person who lived across the road from a friend. We had a nice chat while I got my thumb stitched back together. When the doctor told me to return in 10 days for suture removal I looked at him blankly and asked if I could just do that myself.
    Crayola Posse - Pine Green
    RIP Whinnie Pine (June 4, 1977 - April 29, 2008)


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
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    New Zealand
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    Many, many years ago I came off a horse onto concrete hard ground on my back. Swelled and bruised. After about 4 days went to Dr who insisted I get onto examing bed so he could look at me - even after I said I didn't think I could. Took one look at my back and was like, Ahhh, not going to even touch that, you can go for x-rays. My response was "it can't be broken, I've been riding". His: "Most people couldn't even walk with bruising like that. I think you've probably broken your pelvis". I hadn't.

    Same horse, when long format horse trials still happened. Very fit, tense horse went up and over backwards on me minutes before I was due to start. I landed on my shoulder then horse stood on my upper arm as she stood up. Climbed back on, did roads and tracks, then steeplechase and next roads and tracks - by which time I could not move arm or hand at all. Arrived at 10 minute box in shock and close to tears. Horse began jacking up again as soon as I asked her to whoa. Vet had come up to take heart rate. I couldn't stop horse or get off. Vet ended up grabbing me and hauling me off horse. Not really what he planned to do that day! Off to ER. Lots of xrays. Arm looking pretty spectacular. Docs and xray technician were heard to comment: "it MUST be broken." It wasn't, but serious muscle damage.

    Broke ribs. Friend took me to local ER. Doc took one look at me as I stood up and said "You've got broken ribs".

    Got bucked off a horse. "What speed were you going when you fell off?" "horse was bucking" "Yes, but what speed." "Umm, bucking speed?" Had to explain that when the horse starts bucking it is no longer galloping or whatever.

    Had a few people at work (I work at a hospital, policy of asking about domestic violence if at all suspected, staff or patients) ask about bruises. Now they know!! I usually have even bigger bruises than the ones they can see.

    A friend recently broke her hand. She went to ER and made sure to tell the nurse that it was her own fault. Nurse told her that in all her years working in ER, no horse person had ever said it was the horse's fault.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2012
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    Kansas
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    639

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    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    From the procession of assorted doctors, nurses and other people who came by to check out my wounds, the result of getting gored by a deer isn't something that the ER sees every day of the week..
    Come on... you've got to tell us the rest of the story, Don't leave me hanging!



  5. #85
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    Aug. 28, 2012
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    Kansas
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    [QUOTE=phoebetrainer;6967437Nurse told her that in all her years working in ER, no horse person had ever said it was the horse's fault.[/QUOTE]

    That's how you can tell the difference between people who like horses and true horsepeople.
    Last edited by californianinkansas; May. 2, 2013 at 06:52 AM. Reason: typo, typo again. I need coffee.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by microbovine View Post
    Atr, holy cow!

    That reminds me of a family friend that came back from deer hunting with what appeared to be a cloven hoof shaped bruise on his forehead. It took quite a bit of nagging and some alcohol to get the story. He walked up to a fawn laying in the grass and mama deer came flying out of the woods, like a ninja, and knocked him flat, LOL! He came home empty-handed.
    If he was hunting when does have fawns to defend, he was definitely hunting illegally!

    Deer hunting is only permitted for a few short days in the late fall.

    Something in that story doesn't quite make sense.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    From the procession of assorted doctors, nurses and other people who came by to check out my wounds, the result of getting gored by a deer isn't something that the ER sees every day of the week..
    A friend raised a dogied fawn and when he was a big buck, one day he attacked her and she barely got out of the way crawling under a fence, with the help of her rottie attacking the deer to keep it off her.
    She spent a week in intensive care after they put her back together.

    That is someone that was World Champion bull rider in her younger days and still said that deer attack was the most vicious, scariest of her life.

    Glad you got out of that one alive.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #88
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    Oct. 22, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    If he was hunting when does have fawns to defend, he was definitely hunting illegally!

    Deer hunting is only permitted for a few short days in the late fall.

    Something in that story doesn't quite make sense.

    I was going to say the same thing. Fawns only hide in the grass when they are very young, before they develop a scent. If he was able to approach a fawn, he was hunting illegally
    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I can't decide if I should saddle up the drama llama, dust off the clue bat, or get out my soapbox.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    He was hunting at a friend's place (private property) in CA. He and his brother weren't always ones to follow the rules exactly. I don't know all the details but I know he wasn't hunting the fawn. He said he was just peeking at it. Not very smart.
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran



  10. #90
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    Oh and I just looked up California mule deer and their fawning periods can be variable. Those guys might have been following the rules exactly, for all I know. I was the soft-hearted young lady in the room that was delighted to see that they came back empty handed. And that our family friend was not real keen on hunting after that.
    Where the short cows roam.

    War veteran



  11. #91
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2010
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    Middle America
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    Well, I've had my fair share of ER visits, since I'm a horse person AND incurably accident-prone, but they're usually mild breaks and sprains.

    My last visit? I woke up in the middle of the night, wanted a drink of water, and thought I could TOTALLY get a water glass out of the cabinet without putting on my glasses OR using a stool.....and I dropped a hand-blown, oversize glass tumbler on my own forehead.

    Ended up with a pretty good concussion. Out of work for 2 days, with some dizziness and short-term memory loss.

    Because I dropped. a water glass. on my own head.

    I know every one of the ER nurses and docs think my husband abuses me.
    In order to think outside the box, one must first know what is in the box.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #92
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    Oct. 4, 2010
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    Middle America
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    Oooh, and I have another, courtesy of my BFF from when we both worked for my trainer.

    We were putting winter blankets on one evening before feeding dinner. Well, she dragged the blanket into the stall, and the clip on one of the elastic leg straps got stuck under the sliding stall door. She's kinda impatient and rammy, so rather than sliding the leg strap AROUND, she pulled. And then pulled harder. Eventually the clip squeezed under the stall door, and the taut elastic gave, sending the metal clip rocketing up towards her forehead.

    6 stitches right between the eyes!
    In order to think outside the box, one must first know what is in the box.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #93
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    Jan. 3, 2013
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    I am super accident prone too! I woke up one morning and my finger was red and swollen. I didn't do anything physical the previous day and it was completly fine when I went to sleep. After a week without the swelling going down I went to my doctor and it was sprained and needed a splint. The look on his face when he asked me what I did and I said I went to sleep. Literally fell asleep and it was fine woke up and it was red and swollen. I really don't think he believed me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kadenz View Post
    Well, I've had my fair share of ER visits, since I'm a horse person AND incurably accident-prone, but they're usually mild breaks and sprains.

    My last visit? I woke up in the middle of the night, wanted a drink of water, and thought I could TOTALLY get a water glass out of the cabinet without putting on my glasses OR using a stool.....and I dropped a hand-blown, oversize glass tumbler on my own forehead.

    Ended up with a pretty good concussion. Out of work for 2 days, with some dizziness and short-term memory loss.

    Because I dropped. a water glass. on my own head.

    I know every one of the ER nurses and docs think my husband abuses me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #94
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    Oct. 4, 2010
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    Middle America
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    I shattered my elbow STANDING STILL ON ROLLERBLADES.

    Literally still, no movement, and the next thing I knew I was on my side on the ground with a shattered elbow. Ridiculous.
    In order to think outside the box, one must first know what is in the box.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #95
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    Feb. 26, 2011
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    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
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    So I had a radial head fracture 4 times. The first time was coming off a horse, the second time was actually over a fence on the same horse. Very long story. The third time was IN. MY. SLEEP. Went to hospital to get it set, again, and told the doc I rolled over.

    "Rolled over what?" he asked. "A cliff?"
    The fourth time I slipped walking in to the receiving barn and landed on the same blasted elbow
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #96
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    Apr. 5, 2011
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    841

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    Not an ER visit, but . . . four years ago we had a late-spring blizzard coming in and I had a short amount of time to get horses fed and blankets on before it hit. Putting the last blanket on the last old mare, bent over to do up the leg straps -- and didn't realize another horse had come up behind her. She kicked. Me. Square in the knee. I landed in the manure pile some ten feet away. Happily, my parents took me to the chiropractor when they got home and the hoof-shaped bruise confirmed my story. I'm sure the smell did, too.

    Unfortunately for me, that was my last semester as a grad student and both of my classes were held on the third floor of a building without an elevator. And my professors found the story hilarious, for some reason.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #97
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by rustbreeches View Post
    So I had a radial head fracture 4 times. The first time was coming off a horse, the second time was actually over a fence on the same horse. Very long story. The third time was IN. MY. SLEEP. Went to hospital to get it set, again, and told the doc I rolled over.

    "Rolled over what?" he asked. "A cliff?"
    The fourth time I slipped walking in to the receiving barn and landed on the same blasted elbow
    Owie. I broke my elbow falling off a horse, too. It hurts.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #98
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    Jul. 15, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoebetrainer View Post
    Got bucked off a horse. "What speed were you going when you fell off?" "horse was bucking" "Yes, but what speed." "Umm, bucking speed?" Had to explain that when the horse starts bucking it is no longer galloping or whatever.
    I was asked that question once. My response?

    "Terminal velocity, I think."
    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #99
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    Feb. 4, 2012
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    Midwest
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    I have a few .....

    1. Broken leg 1 (shattered tibia/fibula): thanks to a pony who had a history of bucking people off. Not sure why I agreed to ride him. While riding a course in a schooling show, he took threw a very big, very unexpected buck and launched me. Footing was pretty wet and sloppy from rain the previous night and I landed in the biggest puddle. At first my instructor, who ran into the ring asked: "How do you know your leg is broken?" as I screamed that my ankle was broken. I replied that my leg was going the wrong direction. I laid in the arena for about 45 minutes as the paramedics had some difficulty with th situation. Apparently, when they arrived, they stopped and hesitated before entering the arena, then rolled up their pant legs to avoid getting them overly dirty. Then they couldn't get the boot off due to the .... interesting .... angle of my leg. Ended up losing a tall boot, breeches, show shirt, and undergarments that day. I was COVERED in mud and apparently very memorable to the ER staff since ...

    2. Broken leg 2: Horse spooked and took out my "good" leg, snapping both tibia and fibula cleanly - open fracture. Note: do not suggest a good site for IVs to the paramedics (previous experience with the other injury let me know which arm was better/easier for finding veins!) . They tend to think you may be into less than legal activities. Got to the ER and was immediately recognized: "Weren't you here a few months ago? The horse girl that come in covered in mud?" Yeah .... (Both injuries required surgery to repair. Second surgery was more eventful as it went fine, but about 24 hours after surgery, while still recovering in th Ortho ward, I took a big turn downward with my O2 levels sinking and my heart-rate very high. I remember very little of this due to the low O2 - parents filled me in later).

    I can think of more stories, but I think that's enough!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
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    New Zealand
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    Another one - but this only has a Dr in it because I work in a hospital. Was part of a project group which involved a forensic psychiatrist who does interveiws with victims and expert witness service for court cases. Most other people on the project group knew me and my out of work activities.

    Meeting had finished and Dr said to me: "So, PT, how did you get those bruises on your arm". Looked at the arm to check out what bruises he was talking about. "Oh one of the ponies bucked me off." "What caused those bruises though?" "Oh, she smacked me into the rails of the fence. I've got even bigger bruises on my thigh. Wanna see them?". Hastily: "Ahhh, no, that's fine".

    Colleagues did some asking about why he was asking me. Turns out the bruises were exactly like defensive bruises in women who have been beaten and put up their arms to protect themselves. Colleagues carried it a bit further and asked if he thought I had been beaten. (They knew I lived alone). He was happy with my story. He said the fact that I told the story straight off, that it was really wierd (Who'd ever make up a crazy story like that to cover for being beaten up?) and that I'd offered to show even bigger bruises indicated that I was not being beaten. He then added that he was not so sure that I was of completely sound mind if I did this for pleasure.

    I still work sometimes with some of those people and they often ask me what insane pleasure I have had recently. THAT really brings odd looks when we all crack up!


    3 members found this post helpful.

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