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  1. #1
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    Apr. 26, 2003
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    Default Comb/Brush Recommendations for Long Haired Cats?

    I ended up w/ a young cat who has long, fluffy hair. He's just now becomming trusting enough for me to pet him, and I can tell that a good brushing or combing is needed.

    Anyone have a recommendations, ideas, or tips on grooming a long-haired (and skittish) cat?



  2. #2
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    Lexington, KY
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    I use the Furminator on my long haired beast. You can find it on Amazon for much cheaper than at pet stores.

    For reference, this is the type of fuzz I'm dealing with. Lol

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by kristinq; Apr. 29, 2013 at 03:19 PM. Reason: Pic added!
    Every one of them had that look of a girl infatuated with horses, the happy, fated look of a passenger setting sail on the Titanic.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 13, 2005
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    I'd wait until he fully trusts you before going anywhere near him with a brush. My two cats (one long haired - maine coon - and the other DSH) HATE being brushed and I've known them their whole lives so they've had no trust issues etc.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  4. #4
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristinq View Post
    I use the Furminator on my long haired beast. You can find it on Amazon for much cheaper than at pet stores.

    For reference, this is the type of fuzz I'm dealing with. Lol

    Click image for larger version. 

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    THIS! There is also a cheaper version called the FurrGoPet that I purchased at Target. They're a little pricey but seriously worth it.



  5. #5
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    Apr. 26, 2003
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    Thanks for the info. on the Fuminator & FurrGoPet. Will try to buy one this weekend. The last long-haired cat I owned was many years back, and I don't think those existed back then.

    Also a thanks to Event4Life for the word of caution. This poor cat has only just begun to come out of hiding when I walk in the room, and the last thing I want is to scare him all over again.



  6. #6
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    Dec. 19, 2007
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    Camden, DE
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    I used to have a long haired cat, but now have two short haired cats. I have found that the Furminator worked well on both. I usually use the Furminator followed by a slicker brush. The Slicker picks up an stray little loose hairs that the Furminator may have left behind, and is a nice finishing touch to the coat.



  7. #7
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    Mar. 13, 2007
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    I found a much cheaper alternative that works wonders on my long-haired kitties! Just buy a metal comb designed for dogs with double coats—they alternate one long tine with a short tine, all the way down. It catches the very small mats much better than a regular comb, and the cats seem to object to it a lot less.
    "If you get to thinking you're a person of some influence, try ordering somebody else's dog around." –Will Rogers



  8. #8
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    Nov. 18, 2010
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    North Carolina
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    Kristinq, what a beautiful cat! And very fuzzy

    Kneigh, if he's super shy, I'd start out really slow and make sure he's okay with lots of petting all over and then go to a slicker brush or even a baby brush before I used something for more serious grooming. I'd hate to lose all the progress made from an accidental ouch if you hit a mat.

    Good luck! Keep lots of treats on hand - they make everything better. lol

    I use one of those combs like chesnutmarebeware is talking about. It works great on long and short haired cats. All of them like it except for the one that needs it but then again, he thinks his all of his fur needs to stay on his body, regardless of how messy or matted.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 28, 2007
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    NY
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    Somewhere on YouTube or locates is a long video of a cat being vacuumed and loving it.
    Im not fond of the furminator, although I used it. It seemed to trim the long hairs and gave the coat a harsh feeling. I also thought I used it too much and the cat didn't have adequate protection that winter.



  10. #10
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    Dec. 20, 2011
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    I use a bunch of different brushes on my long haired beast.

    The slicker is the go-to brush, but I also use a Zoom Groom to really get all the loose hair out of the coat 'cause I can work it like a curry (my cat doesn't mind me moving it "against the grain" so I can really get it through the layers). It helps to work the dander loose and aerate the coat too.

    I used to have a Furminator, but it wasn't small enough to get in the spots where she really gets the knots and pilled up fur (ruff around her head, chest, either side of the tail base). I happened across a Hartz Fur Fetcher that was the perfect size and does something similar to the Furminator.

    The short haired cat gets "curried" with the Zoom Groom and a good scrubbing with a groomer mitt.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 11, 1999
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    Clayton, CA USA
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    I have found that using a brush on long haired (or even short haired) cats is often preferable to using my hand, when it comes to petting them. I deal with many kittens and cats who come from rough situations, and they seem to like the idea of being touched, but not necessarily by a person. I use one of those human hair brushes that have short bristles all the way around. A long haired kitten I had at Christmas loved being brushed with that, and she left looking quite spiffy. To me, using anything complicated looking or, god forbid, a vacuum, on an already wary cat wouldn't work well.
    Mystic Owl Sporthorses
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  12. #12
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by VaqueroToro View Post
    I use a bunch of different brushes on my long haired beast.

    The slicker is the go-to brush, but I also use a Zoom Groom to really get all the loose hair out of the coat 'cause I can work it like a curry (my cat doesn't mind me moving it "against the grain" so I can really get it through the layers). It helps to work the dander loose and aerate the coat too.

    I used to have a Furminator, but it wasn't small enough to get in the spots where she really gets the knots and pilled up fur (ruff around her head, chest, either side of the tail base). I happened across a Hartz Fur Fetcher that was the perfect size and does something similar to the Furminator.

    The short haired cat gets "curried" with the Zoom Groom and a good scrubbing with a groomer mitt.
    I bought that Zoom Groom and my cat hated it! She actually swatted at me and tried to bite when I used it on her. I wasn't doing it hard or anything, I think she just didn't like the sensation because she LOVES being brushed with a slicker brush.

    I used to pet sit for 3 Persians and had to groom them daily. I started off with a metal comb that has the rotating teeth (so you don't snag the hair) and then finished up with a large slicker brush.

    I actually think that the Furminator type brushes work better on short haired cats because they pull out the undercoat - I never had very good luck with it on longer hair.



  13. #13
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by chestnutmarebeware View Post
    I found a much cheaper alternative that works wonders on my long-haired kitties! Just buy a metal comb designed for dogs with double coats—they alternate one long tine with a short tine, all the way down. It catches the very small mats much better than a regular comb, and the cats seem to object to it a lot less.
    This! I use it on all 3 of my persians and it works like a charm. Have to religiously stay on top of the grooming, though. I take two of mine to the groomer's every 3 months in addition to combing once a week (at least).
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  14. #14
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    I use a simple slicker brush.

    Occasionally I find a greyhound comb useful.

    I will occasionally use a furminator, but have really gotten away from it. You have to be careful because it CAN make the cat quite sore. For a distrusting cat, I would definitely not start with that.



  15. #15
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    Jun. 15, 2010
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    I think a soft slicker brush and a gentle hand is the best brush for a medium or long haired cat. I actually use a stripping comb designed for rolling a terrier coat for my shorthair with amazing results but I would only use it on a really relaxed long-haired who loved being groomed because it does apply tension which could be disconcerting for a nervous cat.



  16. #16
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    Dec. 20, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPony View Post
    I bought that Zoom Groom and my cat hated it! She actually swatted at me and tried to bite when I used it on her. I wasn't doing it hard or anything, I think she just didn't like the sensation because she LOVES being brushed with a slicker brush.
    It does take them a bit to get used to because I think the rubber grabs the hair and pulls on it a bit. I got mine used to it by using both at the same time -- I'd use the slicker brush on her cheeks (her absolute favorite spot to be brushed) then ZG the base of her tail (another of her fav spots). Eventually I could ZG her entire body while slickering her cheeks, then I stopped with the slicker and she was cool with the ZG all over. I just worked up to being able to "back comb and rough her up" with the ZG.

    I desensitized my parents' cat to the ZG in same way (double coated shorthair) and I always get a kitten-and-a-half worth of hair out of her coat -- she loves the slicker, but it doesn't clean out her coat of the crud like the ZG does.



  17. #17
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    Jan. 27, 2010
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    MD
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    I have a long haired beast who gets lazy about grooming himself when his hair gets too long. He doesn't mind being brushed, but I mind the hair in my house and the matting he gets! Problem solved with a lion cut! He loves his haircut and doesn't mind going to the groomers. Works for everyone!

    I have tried the Furgo pet (FYI it's exactly the same as furminator but just marketed to mass instead of pet specialty stores) and it works quite well.



  18. #18
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    Apr. 26, 2003
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    Latest update: Yesterday a fellow boarder at my boarding stable who'd just had her cat put down (the elderly cat had seizures - nothing contagious) and gave me her cat's remaining food and a nice medium length, soft-tine brush. When I got home I "practiced" brushing my very laid back short-haired cat and was surprised at how much hair it took off her while she purred away.

    I then carefully went to brush the skittish new guy (no name yet) which was a partial success. I was able to get in some light stroking along his shoulders to the base of his tail, however trying to brush w/ enough force to get down to his skin is still too frightening. If he were a horse, I'd also describe him as very head-shy, so I have to move slowly and stealthily to get the brush near him at all. But at least we are making progress!

    In the near future I will have to buy one of your recommendations, and thanks all for your suggestions and tips.



  19. #19
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    We had an "accident" do to overzealous furminating. I took out too much undercoat (totally my fault, wasn't even thinking this was possible & Mr Black was diggin' it).

    So, I stopped using it (in case I can't control myself). I only used it on the short hair, haven't found that it works so well on the fluffies. I like slicker brush for them.



  20. #20
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    I use a simple slicker brush.

    Occasionally I find a greyhound comb useful.

    I will occasionally use a furminator, but have really gotten away from it. You have to be careful because it CAN make the cat quite sore. For a distrusting cat, I would definitely not start with that.
    I had no idea those were called grey hound combs! Used to use them on the labs, but don't grey hounds have thinner coats? would they even have anything to comb through?



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