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  1. #21
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    Feb. 19, 2009
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    I say this coming from a TOTAL weenie adult perspective who didn't even start riding, let alone jumping, until I was 24 (I am now 30)

    JUST GO OUT THERE AND HAVE FUN. You will get beaten by the kids-its just a fact. They are fearless, and don't have the hang ups we do about riding. Even if they've only been riding a couple years. I admitted this to myself long, long ago and it has made showing that much less pressure on myself. I don't consider it rude because I wouldn't be in the divisions with them if I didn't belong there. You don't sound like you're a ribbons/points chaser either, so don't worry about it.

    I also think that doing 2'3" versus 2'? Not going to make a big difference to your eye. Honestly. Next time you ride, maybe see if your trainer could (without you knowing) throw in a couple of 2'3" fences scattered throughout the course. I think you'll find it rides just the same and you won't be able to tell. Also, I know at the shows in my area 90% of the time courses are set really soft. So what is listed as 2'3", won't be a true 2'3", or at least not all the fences.



  2. #22
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    Jun. 12, 2007
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    Westchester County, NY
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    Some schooling shows have short stirrup (under 12) and long stirrup (over 12). That at least gets you away from the littlest kids. There used to be a schooling show series (when I was little) that had short stirrup (under 18) and long stirrup (over 18). If there was enough interest, they also held a rusty stirrup for over 35. You may just have to dig around.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Apr. 9, 2012
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    Right now I will be happy with any rinky-dink local shows as long as the footing is safe enough.

    I'm definitely not someone who used to be good and is just a wuss. I'm a wuss and jumped 2' max once or twice on a good day. Because I knew my gelding would do it and I didn't know what I didn't know.

    Now I'm jumping maybe 12" verticals on my mare, maybe a 2'3" xrail thrown in. I need give her a non-crappy ride or her athleticism kicks in and she jumps too big or too long for me.

    I just want to have a safe learning experience for both of us. She could go and jump a 4' course tomorrow with a better rider, but she's learning to take care of her mom over small jumps.

    So I really am a genuine beginning adult in the show world. I guess folks think by my age, you should be able to jump 2'3"-2'6" and up!

    My flatwork isn't so bad, though. Doesn't sound so bad to enter adult flat classes and do warmups o/f for awhile.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2013
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    206

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    I love this thread... my goal is piles of poles in the fall. I'm 42. Back riding about 10 months with 7 year old project. I fell going over 2' and the ground is a long way down, so until I am totally happy with my seat, piles of poles and some nice age appropriate hunter under saddle it is.

    I think our local show would do more for weenie adults, the problem is that there are not enough weenie adults who admit they are weenie and either don't show or show where they are not ready.

    I just want to have fun and sometimes, I have more fun riding with the kids than the adults. :-)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2009
    Location
    SE VA
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    427

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    It sounds to me like the original poster is truly in the adult beginner category and belongs in those classes and shouldn't worry about it, as long as she can live with being beaten by some of the tiny tots. You are eligible for the class. It is there for people of all ages of your ability level. Go get experience and have fun. If you show not to be judged, then you don't get the benefit of the judge's perspective of your riding and that's a big part of what you are paying for. We have some lovely ladies at my barn who, although they don't show, aren't even at the cross rail stage. I know plenty of folks who have come to riding later in life and shouldn't be ashamed to be showing in the classes where they belong. It sure sounds like the OP wants to be able to move up and isn't out there to steal ribbons away from children and will move out of that division when she is ready.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Apr. 9, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sfbayequine View Post
    I just want to have fun and sometimes, I have more fun riding with the kids than the adults. :-)
    Haha, me, too!!!

    No concerns (or shame) in losing to the kids! There are some good little riders out there in their braids and jods!
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Nov. 14, 2012
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    87

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    Try the Hott Horse shows--Brownland & Maffit Lake. I believe they had an adult X-rails division just last week at Brownland and they have plenty of small (2ft-2ft6in) course options that many adults ride in. The horse shows were very well run. Also, Ocala had a HITS 2ft hunter division every week that kids, teens, and adults rode in. While I don't remember seeing these options a few years ago, I think this type of division is being included in more shows!

    Plus both of those shows had a ticketed warm up. So you could get some practice in and your confidence up before you step into the show ring to show the kids a thing or two


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2011
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    349

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    There is nothing at all shameful about an adult showing against children in a class she is eligible for. As someone else said, there are beginner riders at all ages. Kudos to you for wanting to get out into the show ring in an appropriate division where you can have a fun learning experience!

    In my area, the beginner rider and hunter divisions are open to riders of any age who have never shown at fences at 2' or above. These classes are usually crossrails or small 18" verticals. The courses in beginner rider are very simplistic, often once or twice around the outside. Beginner hunter sometimes has a more traditional outside diagonal hunter course. Some days these divisions have mostly adults, sometimes mostly children, and often a mix of both. I hope I don't get flamed for saying this, but don't think it is morally wrong at all for an adult of similar riding ability and experience to win over a child, therefore "taking" the ribbon from that child. Children need to learn that the best performance wins, not the youngest, cutest exhibitor whose feelings are most likely to be hurt if they don't get the ribbon they wanted. This is an important lesson in life and especially in the show ring. I remember way back when I was an 8-yr-old showing in the beginner classes. Sometimes there were adults there. I never felt cheated when they won; in fact just the opposite. And, it made me proud when I legitimately beat someone much older than me!

    To those who say just wait till you can show 2'3 or 2'3 is really the same as crossrails, I politely disagree. Beginner classes usually allow trotting on course, so simple changes are permissible. The courses are very simplistic. There aren't oxers. There is a legitimate difference between trotting/cantering around crossrails on the outside track and doing a full hunter course at 2'3. Since there are beginner divisions designed to be a stepping stone before 2'3 or 2'6, riders SHOULD show in those divisions if they don't feel confident or ready for the next level up. I think some people forget how much of a difference 6" can really make, even if a lot of it is mental!

    Good luck to you!! Have fun!


    7 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
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    3,796

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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post


    If the adult qualifies for the class, it doesn't matter if the kidlets are in it. As a spectator, you have absolutely NO idea what the circumstances are behind the rider and/or their horse and it's a bit obnoxious to make assumptions.

    Just because someone is an adult does not mean they rode when they were younger. It also doesn't mean that if they did they still have the same skills or abilities.

    And as the manager of a "rinky dinky schooling show," if I have a judge giving "extra" credit to cute kids and making huge assumptions about adult riders belonging in another ring, well, I'm not hiring them again. I pay them to judge according to the specs of the class, not to do my job as manager, which is to make sure the riders in the class should be in the class.

    I agree with Rugbug here. If it is an open x rail class then it's open to all riders. Don't let others make you feel bad about it. Why should you stay home if you qualify for the class and get good miles of experience and have some fun.

    I believe too many people judge others and they are not being paid to do so. The judge is and let them be the judge. Pun intended

    I have been in a lower level class against some kiddos and some people said I shouldn't be in that division - yes, it bothered me for a minute; but knew she didn't know my situation and it's really none of my business what she thinks of me anyway.

    Enjoy yourself, build your confidence. We all know when you get to the show it is much different than schooling at home. Many schooling shows offer open x rails just for that type of situation.

    Especially with horses; you have gut feelings for a reason. Go with them.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2008
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    San Diego
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    I say go show in the classes that you are eligable for and have fun. My mare is fairly green and we do open crossrails, we even did open walk/trot over poles our first year showing together. Does it mean that I get beaten by pigtails on an old schoolie pony? Oh you bet, but it's all for fun! I am more comfortable at lower fence heights, and Miss Maresy being a more western built paint with some joint issues cant go higher than 2'3 or 2'6 anyways. Try the crossrails and then move up to Rusty Stirrup, that's what we did. Try some amateur Eq flat or pleasure classes too, whatever your shows offer. The shows that I have done have always had a mix of kids and adults in the beginner divisions, because people learn to ride at all ages.
    Proudly Owned By Sierra, 2003 APHA Mare
    In Loving Memory of Tally, April 15, 1983 - June 2, 2010



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
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    3,556

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    I have been showing in some low level Combined Tests. (dressage and stadium). Last year to get my chicken self out there, I competed in Tad Poles(walk/trot dressage, ground poles stadim) and got year end champion. This year, I plan on starting with the Tad Poles and then do the 18" cross rails. It is pretty fun. No one cares about how your horse jumps, just if it jumps. I plan on trotting the stadium to get my chicken self back into jumping.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2013
    Location
    Ca
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    40

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    I so needed to find this thread. I swore as a kid jumpers were crazy, and here I am riding H/J. To me, yes there is a difference between 2' and 2'3", I noticed the pole my trainer snuck in and ended up eating dirt. Just cause we enjoy somthing doesn't mean we have the confidence for it right off the bat (or ever). I have been searching out schooling shows with pile of poles, low cross-rails, etc. At this point I'd be happy with flat classes, its all about getting experience and enjoying it for some of us. Enjoy whatever you feel brave enough to do now, and if you want to go bigger next time, then you know what to expect.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2012
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    135

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    Our "rinky dinky" local shows have Extremely Green Horse/Rider (18"), Beginner Rider (2'-2'3) and Adult Rider (2'-2'3). Extremely Green Rider is all ages, Beginner Rider is all ages but does have mostly 12-20 yr olds, and Adult Rider is for adults. We also have Walk/Trot Crossrails Rider. Look around a bit maybe, they're out there. =]
    Last edited by Kiera; May. 1, 2013 at 02:15 AM. Reason: Oops, forgot to add class. Ugh...



  14. #34
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    Dec. 29, 2001
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    1,006

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    Some local shows have "rusty stirrup" divisions, which are *tailor made* for the OP!

    Count me among the many who believe there is no shame in showing in a manner that builds confidence for the rider and/or horse that may require it.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2002
    Location
    Eastern MA
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    2,366

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    Quote Originally Posted by westie55 View Post
    To those who say just wait till you can show 2'3 or 2'3 is really the same as crossrails, I politely disagree. Beginner classes usually allow trotting on course, so simple changes are permissible. The courses are very simplistic. There aren't oxers. There is a legitimate difference between trotting/cantering around crossrails on the outside track and doing a full hunter course at 2'3. Since there are beginner divisions designed to be a stepping stone before 2'3 or 2'6, riders SHOULD show in those divisions if they don't feel confident or ready for the next level up. I think some people forget how much of a difference 6" can really make, even if a lot of it is mental!

    Good luck to you!! Have fun!
    As a weenie adult, I LOVE you for saying this


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Apr. 9, 2012
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    NYC=center of the universe
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    I love having company in weenie-ness!! Makin' me feel good here!!
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
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    You can always try a combined training show. At schooling shows there are usually plenty of us adults in there just starting out or on green beans. They usually off heights staring at 18" xrails and then go to 2' and up from there. Just a thought.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2008
    Posts
    503

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    CT has Long stirrup at some shows. Check the chsa calendar www.chsaonline.com

    Long stirrup is always crossrails though it says it can be up to 2'. The long stirrup riders would love to have company, it's not a very big division.

    Here's a show that runs it:
    http://www.pinesfarm.com/Prize_Lists...13%20final.pdf



    Quote Originally Posted by ako View Post
    I would love a nice adult xrail division haha!! We could do hunters or eq.

    Really I figure this summer I will be ready to show 2'. Good luck finding that at the local shows! HITS has Adult Maiden Eq, which would be perfect. But realistically we would go only once.

    The problem really is that I'm a wuss. I was jumping a solid 2' years ago - no distances and poor riding, I just pointed my gelding at a jump. I wasn't able to jump for awhile when he was diagnosed with Navicular. Then I had ACL surgery.

    Now I have a great mare, but she's very powerful and I'm focusing on giving her a good ride, so we're going slow. I don't bounce so well now.

    Pretty much everything for adults at local shows starts at 2'3" or 2'6". I feel a little rude showing against kids, even when they are better riders than me!!

    Arghhh.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2012
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    613

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    Quote Originally Posted by ako View Post
    Haha, but I'm still working my way back to 2'!!

    I did an opportunity class against the kids last year. Some of the kids were almost babies and I'm 42!! They looked so tiny on their little, often naughty ponies. And there's chunky munky moi on my 17.1 Oldenburg mare! I kinda just wanted to give the kids the blue ribbons.
    Hi, Ako, and welcome to the adult re-riders club!! I am also 42 and a just getting into showing. Last year I started with local schooling shows, adult pleasure, beginner hunter, x-rails, etc. and competed in 2' divisions. I did not compete against really young kids, but, of course, there were tons of juniors and they almost always kicked my butt! To make things worse, they were usually from my barn. It's definitely NOT the end of the world and I really recommend you put it out of your mind. One of the best things about our sport is that it is mostly sex/age neutral (particularly at the lower level), so we are all competing at our own levels. The reality is we will likely NEVER be as good as the best junior riders so don't feel so bad about competing against them. Just go out and enjoy yourself. I love seeing the other adults in my classes
    ~ In the chaos of the showing, remember riding should be fun for all, including our 4-legged kids.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Dec. 28, 2012
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    613

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    Quote Originally Posted by ako View Post
    I'm definitely not someone who used to be good and is just a wuss. I'm a wuss and jumped 2' max once or twice on a good day. Because I knew my gelding would do it and I didn't know what I didn't know.

    Now I'm jumping maybe 12" verticals on my mare, maybe a 2'3" xrail thrown in. I need give her a non-crappy ride or her athleticism kicks in and she jumps too big or too long for me.

    I just want to have a safe learning experience for both of us. She could go and jump a 4' course tomorrow with a better rider, but she's learning to take care of her mom over small jumps. ...
    My big guy is just learning to jump and has the athleticism to sucessfully jump a 3'6" equitation or hunter course tomorrow (with the right rider). Unfortunately, I do not have this ability - and proved that on Monday - so he can work at my level and I refuse to feel bad or guilty. We have a great time doing our 2' and 2'3" courses and maybe by the end of the year we will make it up to 3'. If we don't that's okay with me. I had a bunch of goals and plans until I realized (with the help of this forum) that I was sapping all the fun out of riding.

    Anyway, all that said, as a beginner rider, I want to share a story with you. Last Monday, I went to the barn to work on our jumping before a schooling show this weekend. The barn was deserted, but I assumed the BO and neighbor were in the house.

    We warmed up on the flat and then hopped over a couple of 18" cavaletties with no issues. I moved up to the 2' and 2'3" verticals and lines. These all went great so I decided to ride a course of 8 jumps and incorporate a roll back to a larger, wider oxer (2'3" to 2'6"). I really wanted to be ready for the show, and wanted to show in the classes with the adults!

    We jumped the oxer once, fantastically. Perfect distance, pacing, landing, etc. The second time, however, our stride was a little long, so our distance was off. Rather than chip in, my guy took a HUGE distance. He cleared the jump, but I was definitely NOT ready for a 2'9" to 3' effort. I came off over his head on landing with my left leg caught in the stirrup. I twisted around in the air before I landed flat on my back.

    I am now out of riding for the next six to eight weeks because I broke one of the bones in my pelvis.

    The moral of the story ... I shouldn't have worried about moving up so fast. I should have been happy with our 2' and 2'3" courses. I'm not an olympian and this is a hobby. I will definitely take a step back next time and worry less about competing in the big classes.
    ~ In the chaos of the showing, remember riding should be fun for all, including our 4-legged kids.



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