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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2002
    Location
    Southern California
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    1,878

    Default "Is he supposed to be backwards?" "Um...WHAT?!" (excerpt from my blog)

    Time for another riding lesson!

    Took the new German martingale, took my new gloves, took some ibuprofen, took a puff from the inhaler. ::: puts sunglasses on ::: Let's do this.

    A kind friend offered to trailer Tril and me over--well, trailer Tril, I got to ride up front in the truck--and she had a lesson right after mine, so it was a fun twofer for both of us. We got to have our own lesson then learn by watching someone else's.

    But first: as we pulled up and parked the rig, the trainer called out in quizzical amusement, "Is Tril supposed to be backwards??" My friend and I: "Whuhhh??" "Tril is backwards." "Whuhhhhh?"

    We got out of the truck, walked to the back of the rig, and sure enough Tril had his previously tied nose sticking out the back of the trailer. I figured my Houdini had untied himself, as he has done on many, many occasions at the hitching post.

    Nope.

    Tril says, "What?"

    "Is something on my face?"

    I don't know if he chewed through that lead rope or tore it, but dude got himself free. Unbelievable. Except it's Tril, so.... believable. (Working on the next one.) He then apparently decided to take a gander at the world we were leaving behind and turned himself around, though because of having to share the slant load with another horse didn't make it the full 180 degrees (which made unloading interesting). But, thankfully, my goofball didn't hurt himself, something he so excels at doing. Considering his major medical insurance had lapsed and he was no longer covered as of midnight last night, I am grateful that tempting the fates only meant a little jocular reminder as to WHY this horse needs major medical. Seriously.

    I'm thinking of starting a trophy wall for him. I'm sure this won't be the last one.
    Last edited by Lauruffian; Apr. 28, 2013 at 10:52 AM.
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,936

    Default

    That could have been a wreck.

    Good that all is fine.

    Did you have a good lesson after all?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2002
    Location
    Southern California
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    Default

    Yes, a very good lesson in fact. I have the sore legs to show for it. He was a dutiful schoolmaster while I flopped around on him, rediscovering my position and balance while building up strength.

    And yes, that could have been a disaster--yeesh!--but thankfully I can just chuckle and shake my head instead. And renew his medical insurance tomorrow. And triple check next trailer ride.

    Thankfully, Tril has a good head on his shoulders--I think that coupled with riding with a buddy helped keep him safe. GAH.
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2006
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    759

    Default

    I learned that lesson a few years ago when I let a student at the barn load and tie my guy -- I figured she was a pony clubber so surely she knew how to tie, right? Well, maybe she did, maybe she didn't, but somehow my guy managed to end up sticking his head right out the back.

    Luckily, he was the only horse on there and we weren't moving, so we just put the ramp down and reloaded, but I think the poor girls eyes just about came out of her head!


    Tril looks like an adorable (completely innocent, right?) little guy. Hope you had a great lesson
    To be loved by a horse should fill us with awe, for we hath not deserved it.


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    I wonder how you may tie him next, if he starts chewing thru ropes like that.

    He does look like a very nice horse, cute head and not the kind that speaks of trouble, but polite and sweet.

    Maybe some tabasco on the lead would work?
    Try that somewhere else, where if he likes his leads better spiced he won't be even more apt to chew it.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2002
    Location
    Southern California
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    Default

    I'm thinking next time, load him first and use the divider to hold him in place. That way, even if he unties himself or tears through the lead, he's still held in place. This time around, he was loaded second, so he had a little more room.

    Ooh, I like trying the tabasco sauce on the lead. Thing is, up to this point I haven't minded him mouthing his lead (I call it his pony pacifier). I think I've seen reason NOT to allow that habit to continue--or at least, not in the trailer!
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    We have to tie pony to the bars of the pen with this intricate figure of eight and then the quick release in exactly the right place. Yesterday he was all done with his ride and he knew he was all done with his ride and he wanted to GO, so he took ahold of the intricate knot with his teeth and started trying to untie it. He wasn't going to quit either - head turning sideways and very carefully trying to get that one single strand that would undo the knot.

    He has also grabbed ahold of the saddle and lifted it up, leaving these great bucktoothed marks, *sigh*. He also has the circus pony trick, where he stands on the bars of the pen, always gets lots of attention from his people. G@# D)%^& pony! GET OFF!

    He hasn't eaten a leadrope yet though. Your guy is the King!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2002
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    Southern California
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    Default

    ReSomething, I have bucktoothed marks on the cantle of my saddle too!
    SA Ferrana Moniet
    Not goodbye--just waiting at the end of the trail.
    My bloggity blog: Hobby Horse: Adventures of the Perpetual Newbie



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2010
    Posts
    1,225

    Default

    I'd be cautious of putting tabasco sauce on the lead rope, if he's in a situation where he might get the tabasco in his eyes. Tied in a trailer, he might manage it...and then get pretty upset when his eyes burn.

    I like the idea of putting him in there with the slant divider to hold him forward.


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fillabeana View Post
    I'd be cautious of putting tabasco sauce on the lead rope, if he's in a situation where he might get the tabasco in his eyes. Tied in a trailer, he might manage it...and then get pretty upset when his eyes burn.

    I like the idea of putting him in there with the slant divider to hold him forward.
    Yes, you teach them somewhere else, where you can keep an eye on them, that is why I warned not to try it first in the trailer.

    Even in the trailer, once he knows there is tobasco there, he should not mess with it, so the tobasco doesn't has to be full force, just a hint, washed off, so what is left can't come off anywhere and make a mess or worse, cause a burn feeling as described there.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,297

    Default

    How long was he in the rig?

    Maybe you need an award for speed as well as ambition and skill.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Lauruffian, maybe we should start a "my saddle was attacked by a beaver" clique. We can't be the only ones.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
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    4,124

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Lauruffian, maybe we should start a "my saddle was attacked by a beaver" clique. We can't be the only ones.

    No - you wouldn't be alone as my mare ciould be part of that clique.
    Sandy in Fla.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2007
    Posts
    154

    Default

    Perhaps changing your trailer ties to chains would prevent him from chewing through them. What a cute (and mischievous-looking) guy!


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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2013
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    Hopefully at the barn
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    432

    Default

    Glad he wasn't hurt!!!

    Totally off topic, but I have that same lead rope
    Tack Cleaning/All-Things-Tack nut
    ~DQ wanna-be~



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
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    1,909

    Default

    Does he, by chance, have any Arab blood?
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous


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  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
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    2,877

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauruffian View Post
    Ooh, I like trying the tabasco sauce on the lead. Thing is, up to this point I haven't minded him mouthing his lead (I call it his pony pacifier). I think I've seen reason NOT to allow that habit to continue--or at least, not in the trailer!
    I tried tabasco on the lead rope with my Arab gelding and he LOVED it. He stopped chewing it and started sucking on it. Of course, once most of the flavor was gone he started chewing it again.
    Sheilah


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  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2012
    Location
    Kansas
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    737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CFFarm View Post
    Does he, by chance, have any Arab blood?
    That's what I was going to ask!

    Regarding the Tabasco: That works until they decide that they like the way it tastes.

    If my Arabian gelding had thumbs, he'd be the President For Life of a small Caribbean island nation. He knows more voice commands than my dogs.


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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2012
    Location
    Kansas
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    737

    Default

    Lauruffian,
    I just came back from your blog. Added it to my Bookmarks. More posts, please!

    I loved the photos. From looking at your lead ropes, are you sure he doesn't have any Arab in him?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2001
    Location
    New York, NY
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    Default

    We never, ever haul with lead ropes. Use a chain with a quick release snap.


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