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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Default where to find road dust/limestone/gravel dust?

    I need road dust/stone dust/whatever you call it for a base for rubber mats. My neighbor contractor and my handyman both know what I'm talking about (or I think they do), but they have called multiple people and no one knows where to get it. My handyman says it's the same stuff that they use as a base for roads... is that correct? I assume so, as I've heard it called "road dust" before.

    Can someone help me out? Would a stone quarry be the best, even for a small amount (just one stall's worth)?
    And what exactly is it called? I want to make sure I get the correct stuff, and I've seen it called multiple things on these threads.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
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    401

    Default

    Stone dust (here in northern NE) is the fine stuff left over after a quarry filters all the crushed/smashed stone into peastone, gravel, etc. Any quarry* should be able to provide you with this material. You want the nearest quarry for the cheapest price..it should not cost more than $10 a yard.


    *Should not need to go to a stone quarry for this stone dust.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Default

    you should go there and ask to see what you're buying and not worry about the name so much as its content
    Last edited by katarine; Apr. 27, 2013 at 09:49 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    Default

    It's not the same stuff used for road base. We own a rock quarry.

    Since we don't know your location, I can't be of any help but to tell you to call your nearest rock quarry. They probably won't sell you less than a truck load, but should know of someone who would retail it by the scoop.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Location
    gulf coast
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    Default

    On the gulf coast stone dust etc. is impossible to find. Road Base is as close as we can get. Topped with polimerized sand, compacted with a plate compactor, and mats on top should work. A bonus, the road base here is a tan-colored limestone that helps with odor control.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
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    Default

    We got ours from the quarry - if you have multiple call around, we found significant price differences. Might call it blue stone or I think #2 sand/crushed rock
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Sport horses

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Agree with Katarine, everywhere in the country the same stuff has different names. I'd check out landscaping/gardening supply, though a quary will be cheaper.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csaper58 View Post
    On the gulf coast stone dust etc. is impossible to find. Road Base is as close as we can get. Topped with polimerized sand, compacted with a plate compactor, and mats on top should work. A bonus, the road base here is a tan-colored limestone that helps with odor control.
    I am on the gulf coast, so this may explain it.
    My handyman said road base should work just dandy, he thought that was what I was talking about. Said it practically turns to concrete when wet/compacted.

    What do you mean "topped with polymerized sand"?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2008
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Locally, its called stonedust, crushed limestone, fines. So as previous poster said , its called a different name in different parts of the country, and even in the same locality. Yes it is the stuff that almost turns to concrete when wet. Makes a great base for stalls. I agree with the poster who said call a landscape company, because they use it for the base for stone, and brick walkways.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2007
    Location
    North-Central IL
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    Default

    Kinda odd that they'd call it road base, that usually implies it has rock in it. Quarry will be your best bet, it could be called screenings, fines, stone dust, it just depends. But if you call they should be able to tell you what they call it there and/or where to get it if they don't have it. Here we call it either screenings or aglime, depending upon the application.
    Quarry Rat



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    Default

    Ask what's the maximum sized pieces in whatever it's called where you are. You want the stuff that's left over from washing the crushed stone that comes out of the crusher, but has all the rocks screened out of it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
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    gulf coast
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    Where you are living makes a difference in what is available at a reasonable price. There are no rocks here unless they are imported from 100s of miles away.
    No quarry either. Sand and gravel (of varying particle size) are available if you are near a river. The cost of hauling any of these things any distance will eat up your budget. Road base has sand, clay, and several sizes of gravel mixed together, and when compacted is like concrete but it drains.
    If you use really thick mats that won't move road base should be enough.
    The polimerized sand is optional, it is sand treated with a chemical so it solidifies when it gets wet. It also drains, after it hardens. It may be too costly for this use. It is available in bags at Home Depot. I have not found a bulk source yet.
    The best source for road base is usually an agregate company. Your handy man seems to know one. Or check the yellow pages.

    Note: Do not use Road Base where horses will walk on it without a mat. When the horses paw or turn/twist their feet, they will brake the surface and can get stone bruises from the bigger rocks



  13. #13
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csaper58 View Post
    If you use really thick mats that won't move road base should be enough.
    Define "really thick mats". I have 3/4" 4'X6' rubber mats that will be laid down on top of this base.



  14. #14
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    May. 21, 2012
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    Default

    I don't know how big your barn is- but when I did the floor in my barn I hired an excavator who had both a dumptruck and a bobcat- so he brought the crushed limestone here and then spread it out. You might ask the person who moves various stone products around about what you want- and they would know where to get it.

    What I got - the biggest stones are the size of fishtank gravel-and it goes down from there to about cornmeal size. It locks together pretty nice. I don't think I am even going to mat over it except in the stalls. I just spray it down sometimes. We'll see how it goes.



  15. #15
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    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
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    Default

    OP: Your mats will be fine. This stone dust need only be about 3-4 inches thick on top of any road type base compacted fill. Understand that stone dust packs tightly into a solid base because it is recently crushed stone screenings, meaning the tiny bits of stone are very angular and sharp, so they pack well as opposed to old weathered beach sand which does not. The idea is to avoid having some of the larger road base stones right near the surface where they will start to poke up into the rubber matts.



  16. #16
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    Nov. 8, 2012
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    gulf coast
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    Yes, 3/4 rubber mats wil be fine. Wanted to be sure you were not using cheap, thin or ring mats. No 'stall skins' or similar products. They will be torn up by the base.



  17. #17
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    This is getting ridiculous. Absolutely no one has anything closely resembling stone dust around here. csaper58, you are totally correct that it's apparently near-impossible to find.

    My contractor neighbor says he's pretty certain he can find what he calls "rice gravel" that he used to haul to golf courses as a base for the greens. I'm looking into that right now, but does anyone have an idea of how small these rocks need to be? I'm not going to find dust, but this rice gravel may work. I just don't want it tearing up my mats!



  18. #18
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    Mar. 3, 2007
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    North-Central IL
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    Default

    If there's no screenings available at all and you're going to mat over the top anyway I'd ask them if they have small chips, preferably with fines.
    Quarry Rat



  19. #19
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Default

    Can you elaborate what you mean by "small chips" and "fines"? Neither of those are "recognized" terms down here. I may have found a place that has crushed rock sized 0.25" or smaller, but it's $55/cubic yard but may be my only option. Every other place I've called either has sand, gravel, or a combo of both.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2011
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    615

    Default

    You have to be sure that whatever you do end up sourcing will "lock" together when you compact it. That generally means that the material has a multitude of angular particle sizes no bigger than a certain dimension...like 1/8" to 1/4" or so to be close to "stone dust" or "screenings" that we get in this area. You don't want material that is "rounded" like river sand. The angularity is important for compaction and packing.



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