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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    Why would you wear a T shirt to a clinic?
    Because a clinic isn't an actual show...so why not?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    Because a clinic isn't an actual show...so why not?
    Because a clinic is still presenting yourself and your horse to the "public" AND dressing neatly and turning your horse out properly shows that you respect the clinician and are serious about learning from them. It takes no longer to pull on a polo shirt (maybe slightly longer if you with a neat and tidy button down). Same goes for clean, well fitting, conservative britches.

    Of course, I'm also someone who REFUSES to go out in public, no matter the errand, in sweats....maybe I'M the odd one out...


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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    Because a clinic is still presenting yourself and your horse to the "public" AND dressing neatly and turning your horse out properly shows that you respect the clinician and are serious about learning from them. It takes no longer to pull on a polo shirt (maybe slightly longer if you with a neat and tidy button down). Same goes for clean, well fitting, conservative britches.

    Of course, I'm also someone who REFUSES to go out in public, no matter the errand, in sweats....maybe I'M the odd one out...
    On the flip side, if I'm going to a clinic and I'm going to be working all day on my horse, I want to be the most comfortable I can be. If this means a clean T-shirt, I see nothing wrong with this. Who is to say that I'm less serious about learning and I'm disrespectful to the clinician just because I'm wearing clean comfortable clothes that may not be to someone else's standards or what they would wear?

    I'm not being argumentative; I just think that its pretty judgemental to assume that someone is less serious because they're not sporting the current polo shirt at a clinic. I go to a clinic to learn, and what I'm wearing has no bearing on the outcome of my learning.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    On the flip side, if I'm going to a clinic and I'm going to be working all day on my horse, I want to be the most comfortable I can be. If this means a clean T-shirt, I see nothing wrong with this. Who is to say that I'm less serious about learning and I'm disrespectful to the clinician just because I'm wearing clean comfortable clothes that may not be to someone else's standards or what they would wear?

    I'm not being argumentative; I just think that its pretty judgemental to assume that someone is less serious because they're not sporting the current polo shirt at a clinic. I go to a clinic to learn, and what I'm wearing has no bearing on the outcome of my learning.
    Just because you wear a t-shirt doesn't mean that you are less serious. But it is about the image you put forth and how others perceive you. And, honestly, I often find that the people who don't put in the teeny-tiny bit of extra effort in their turnout (horse and rider) often ride and behave like they look (not saying that this is your case, but I've been around the block and I am an avid people watcher...). It might be judgmental but it is a fact of life...we, as humans, judge people by our first impressions. Why not make that first one a stellar one?

    And you jump to conclusions by immediately assuming I mean you need to wear the trendiest, most expensive garb you can find at a clinic. Most of my polos are $10 and found at Target. I don't wear expensive, trendy britches, but I do pick britches that fit well and look nice. And I honestly don't see how a t-shirt is so much more comfortable than a polo. It's a shirt...often made of the same material. One has a collar. The other doesn't. How is that more comfortable?

    I like to be taken very seriously when it comes to my horses and my riding. This touches a lot of points of my life and I put a lot of effort into both my horse and myself, both in regards to his fitness and general health as well as mine. Going that tiny extra step of dressing neatly and professionally is like the cherry on top of a very polished sundae to me.


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  5. #25
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    Many on this thread have described in great detail how they choose to present themselves and their horses in public. We all have our own standards and we choose for ourselves how to dress, groom, etc. I happen to be a breeches, polished boots and button down girl at a clinic. That's what I choose to wear. And I also choose not to look down my nose at other participants who've made different choices. Why should my preferences be forced upon them and why is my standard of dress the gold standard? If the clinician is concerned about how his or her students dress and turn their horses out, then they will publish a dress code and supply presentation guidelines. In lieu of such instructions, freedom abounds (and it sure would be nice if the judgements could be reined in).
    Going to the grocery store or running a movie back to the rental store, I'm not the least bit concerned about my appearance. It doesn't mean that I don't take my shopping seriously. If others waste their time judging me for my shleppy appearance while selecting the perfect bunch of bananas, so be it. I have better things to do.
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
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  6. #26
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    Guess the deal is if you are selling horse "things", like breedings, products, are putting yourself forward as "a player" in clinics, you need to look somewhat Professional in your personal appearance and the product you are pushing. This would include a better type shirt than a T-shirt. Nicer pants or ironed jeans, well fitted breeches with a neat belt. And especially, cleaned shoes or boots.

    If you have no pride in yourself, your horse, what you sell, then WHY would I want to consider you over another horse/product? You are not selling YOURSELF well, not acting appropriately as a Professional should. You probably won't deal with me in a Professional manner, with attention to detail, good contracts for Breeding your stallion, things done in a timely manner. I just wouldn't expect to get treated like I WANT to be treated. Your appearance would put me off, because you haven't done your homework as you need to.

    As a Clinician, if you CAN'T bother with being neat, clean, dressed appropriately to ride WELL, with a clean, well presented horse and tack, then you probably won't be bothered to listen to me either. Nope, not fair, not "right", but YOU are the one doing it to yourself. You CHOSE to make yourself happy first with "comfortable T-shirt, sloppy pants, ungroomed horse". You may be a terrific rider, but shortcutting in appearance of yourself or horse, makes me ask where else do you shortcut things? The Clinician take the time to dress correctly, looks Professional for YOU!

    People DO judge you by how you appear in various settings, Expos, attending Clinics, it is just human nature. I am real harsh (mentally) on folks wearing "bad hats" in Western garb. A hat that looks run over by the herd or your tractor, tightly rolled brim edges, beads hanging off the back, means you are NOT a Cowboy/Cowgirl, you are just dressing with a Western hat as a Fashion Accessory.



  7. #27
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    It might be judgmental but it is a fact of life...we, as humans, judge people by our first impressions.
    It's only a "fact of life" if you settle for being judgemental. How about making an honest attempt at not jumping to conclusions and reserving judgement until the person proves who they are or who they are not?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  8. #28
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    This topic comes up often in my office. I am not a "dressy" person, don't wear makeup or jewelry, never wear a white coat at work, etc. I have even been known to show up with a bit of hay on my pants in the morning. A couple of my partners are super formal: white coat, suit and tie, the works.

    There is a segment of people that are probably put off by my lack of "polish", and there is a (much larger and more vocal, IME) segment that thinks it's just fine or even an asset, and a whole lot of people in the middle who simply don't bother making judgments like that.

    I can't please the ones who are fussy about how a doctor "ought to look" unless I change my entire temperament, value system on appearances, and personal worldview to please them. Then I would probably come off as "fake" anyhow and disappoint the people who like to come see someone in the office who can relate to them a little bit. (I have lots of farmers as patients, for example)

    I am human and also can't resist making a "first impression" in my mind. But in fact I *DO* resist having that first impression be the one that counts, because I believe that people's actions and deeds mean much more than how they look. And I make the effort to give them that opportunity. THEN I go ahead and judge them.

    So seeing a grubby, dirty horse at an expo would cause me to make a first impression, no question. But if I were truly interested in that breed or stallion or product, I would still make the effort to give the person a listen or the horse/product a look.

    I do think, however, that there's a definite line between dirty and unkempt and an absence of "fashion" or artifice.
    Click here before you buy.


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  9. #29
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    I know when our state Horse Fair looks for Parade of Breeds participants, they provide direction on attire, turnout, etc...but you can't make people read, or frankly do anything they don't WANT to do. You'll see people in clean but plain tack and looking neat and tidy...but then the next horse and rider combo is a hot mess but delighted to be there.

    As a young horse crazy girl, I wouldn't have noticed the difference. I don't imagine the tack vendors care: they just want customers. I don't think the food vendors care- they too just want customers.

    So....tell me again: Who is harmed by the dirty horse ridden by the gal in the Git R Done t shirt?


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  10. #30
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    So....tell me again: Who is harmed by the dirty horse ridden by the gal in the Git R Done t shirt?
    Depends on whether unkempt girl is trying to sell dirty horse or make an impression on the segment of the population which adds "appearances" to the formulation of People I Want To Do Business With. Because they're out there, and as JackieBlue stated, everyone's standard is different. If you're there to exhibit and have a good time and have nothing to sell or to represent, then the standard is probably "lower" in that regard.
    Click here before you buy.


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