The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,092

    Default Horse grooming/turnout at events

    Just got back from MN Horse Expo. I could write a book about all the things I saw today (good & bad), but I have decided to write this year's essay on: the variation in the quality of prep/grooming of the horses in the Breed Exhibition.

    I was taught that when you show your animals (dog, horse, cattle...anything) to the public, you are representing not only yourself, your farm, your breed, but your industry. If you are bringing your hog to the local fair, you, the hog & your housing area better look d**n good. I grew up with lots of ppl who showed all sorts of species. Our ag teacher, parents, etc made dang sure we looked and acted professionally when exhibiting.

    So, today I saw horses at the Expo representing their breed association & some were looking top rate: well groomed, clean & sharp.

    However, I also saw a ton that just looked like a total mess. There was one horse for sale that had chestnuts about 3 inches long. I am not saying they were skinny or uncared for, but just...frumpy. Handler or rider tended to match.

    I think someone here once said that no horse ever died from lack of grooming, which is true, but the scruffiness really bothered me.

    I am not expecting full show regalia, or requiring a body clip, but how about a decently groomed horse, please?


    12 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Horse Expos do not tend to attract--how to say this?--the upper crust of the competitive horse world, IME.
    Click here before you buy.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    735

    Default

    We went to the MN Horse Expo about 15 years ago. Things have not changed. Most of the exhibitors for what they called "The Parade of Breeds" simply turned their horses into the arena for a romp. Most could not be caught again in a timely fashion. They used it as uncontrolled exercise time instead of trying to promote their breed to the public. With the exception of a few, they were not prepared to meet the public. I think there are some non horse people that go to Expos. "Look at the pretty horsie" kind of stuff. When there is so much bad press. how sad it is when we have a chance to promote a nice image to the public that we fail to do so.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,092

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Horse Expos do not tend to attract--how to say this?--the upper crust of the competitive horse world, IME.
    I figured this out a while back.

    I saw a lot of stallions that needed immediate surgery.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    I saw a lot of stallions that needed immediate surgery
    Totally stealing that quip.
    Click here before you buy.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,627

    Default

    How fortunate you were to grow up surrounded by people who knew how to prep livestock for shows and to have had an ag teacher and knowledgeable parents who gave a damn. Not everyone is so blessed. The exhibitors at the horse expo were there to enjoy and share their animals with the public and each other. Just being there goes a long way toward fostering a love of and compassion for horses in the general public - two things we can never have too much of. I say kudos to all exhibitors who made an effort to show up, whether privileged with good coaching and ample resources or no.
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/tailsofglory


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    One does not need to be "privileged" to buy a freaking curry comb and a towel.
    Click here before you buy.


    24 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    685

    Default

    There is no excuse for having a slovenly barn area at a show. There is absolutely no excuse for not having a clean, neatly groomed horse at a show. The horse does not have to be clipped or hooves polished, just clean and brushed with nice ground manners. Your barn and your horses are a reflection of you. I would expect that the showgrounds have a wash rack that is available to all. The tack and attire can be threadbare and cheap, but as long as it is clean and in good repair, that is commendable in my opinion.

    I'm second generation mexican-american. My great-grandparents and grandfather came to this country as uneducated migrant farmworkers. I was raised with the saying (loosely translated): "Wealth and education are not distributed equally, but everyone can be clean and have nice manners."


    16 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,907

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    One does not need to be "privileged" to buy a freaking curry comb and a towel.
    *snort* Oh, dw, you have a way of saying exactly what I'm thinking.

    I certainly didn't grow up with the very best of examples in horsemanship. I actually had some pretty lousy examples. You know where *I* learned how to groom a horse and turn it out, and where I got my little inner "GM" from? By picking up magazines and books a LEARNING. Even when I was a kid, people commented on how nice my little horse looked. It isn't hard. George always says, it just requires some elbow grease!

    If you're presenting your horse to the public, it should be presented well. End of story. This is a non-negotiable to me.


    12 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,627

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by californianinkansas View Post
    There is no excuse for having a slovenly barn area at a show. There is absolutely no excuse for not having a clean, neatly groomed horse at a show. The horse does not have to be clipped or hooves polished, just clean and brushed with nice ground manners. Your barn and your horses are a reflection of you. I would expect that the showgrounds have a wash rack that is available to all. The tack and attire can be threadbare and cheap, but as long as it is clean and in good repair, that is commendable in my opinion.

    I'm second generation mexican-american. My great-grandparents and grandfather came to this country as uneducated migrant farmworkers. I was raised with the saying (loosely translated): "Wealth and education are not distributed equally, but everyone can be clean and have nice manners."

    You've illustrated my point, which I apparently did not make very well on the first go 'round. You, like many of us here on the boards, had someone to teach you that your barn and horses are a reflection of you. There are scads of horse owners who don't even realize what their own personal appearance says about them, let alone what the baling twine laying all over the aisle screams to anyone who walks by. There may be no excuse for ignorance, but it is rampant nonetheless and does not cure itself. My use of the word "privileged" had nothing to do with money and everything to do with support, interest and education. Some people are fortunate enough to be surrounded by those who are supportive of them, interested in them and who can and will educate them. Some are not. Some people seek out the help they feel they need and some don't perceive the need. The world might be a pretty bland place if we were all the same.

    And I agree with those who say that immaculate turnout is nonnegotiable when presenting an animal in public. That is, for me and any animal I present in public. Others may do as they please. Hopefully, those who don't share my Type A approach to show turnout will be among my competition so that their lack of attention to detail may work to my advantage.
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/tailsofglory


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,671

    Default

    At the Indy horse expo, I was fairly surprised that the ones I saw looked pretty good. There were lots of breed barns. I have to say, the Morgans I saw ( and I'm a t bred girl) were behind reproach. Clipped, braided could have walked into any A show.

    What I was surprised at was people participating in "clinics" with no helmet ENGLISH. Um...... One of 5 or 6 had a helmet. And these people were not "professional" clinic goers or staged.

    My 5 year old stated loudly " MOMMY THEy DON'T HAVE HELMETS ON".. Let me vanish now...
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    685

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pennywell Bay View Post
    At the Indy horse expo, I was fairly surprised that the ones I saw looked pretty good. There were lots of breed barns. I have to say, the Morgans I saw ( and I'm a t bred girl) were behind reproach. Clipped, braided could have walked into any A show.

    What I was surprised at was people participating in "clinics" with no helmet ENGLISH. Um...... One of 5 or 6 had a helmet. And these people were not "professional" clinic goers or staged.

    My 5 year old stated loudly " MOMMY THEy DON'T HAVE HELMETS ON".. Let me vanish now...
    You should be proud of raising your daughter right.


    12 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,671

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by californianinkansas View Post
    You should be proud of raising your daughter right.
    thanks. I'm a sticker about helmets. ( wish she could be quieter- ha ha)
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,101

    Default

    A couple years ago at the Hoosier Horse Fair I saw a horse so thin I could count ribs from the stands. It was horrific. That and the amount of dirty tack and sloppy clothing was sad to see. There isn't any harm in clean tack, clean half chaps, and a clean polo. Why would you wear a T shirt to a clinic?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    2,092

    Default

    I guess I should take the positive approach & compliment those who were well-turned out. If I go next year, I will make it a point to do so.

    The minis were all looking A-one
    Really, almost every group had horses all along the continuum.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,243

    Default

    Sadly, those folks with poorly turned out animals, stable areas visited by the crowds, will likely NEVER "GET IT" about the need to apply that elbow grease and present a better appearance. These are usually the same folks who have the stallions who "need immediate surgery", because they can't evaluate to be able to tell the difference in presentation of their product and quality of horses in front of them.

    I see it all the time, in how things sell, like stallion breedings, or even tack sales. The animal is dirty with no quality, just a historic horse 5 generations back. For sale tack is FILTHY, but they want the same prices as the CHAMPION, winning stallion gets, or same money as new tack costs! I have helped friends with stallions presented at these Expos, sell my stuff at used Tack Sales. Those stallions I sit with ARE READY to enter any ring, gleam from front to back, have good manners to go with good breeding, make nice foals who can win for you. All my for sale stuff is CLEAN and well conditioned, tagged with sizes, clear pricing BELOW new costs. I try to get fair money for my stuff, but it isn't new, so I don't charge that way. AND I am open to offers, so buyer and I can often meet on a price we both can live with. I usually can sell most of my stuff, while those other folks don't move much at all.

    Sorry, I can't help most of the folks who want to "do the Expo" because they DO NOT wish to invest the work or time to present a better appearance to the public. Almost, is good enough, when they brush out a horse or do anything equine.

    I can't allow my horses to leave the farm looking yucky, they need a bath, tails combed out, clipped, good shoe job on them. First thing EVERYONE notices is our shoes, which is kind of funny. But they WILL come over, be talking to you, even strangers, while staring at the horse hooves. Never look at YOU, just hooves. I have NICE horses, so I do the work to make them look good away from home. Just part of my basic horsekeeping training.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,301

    Default

    I recall I needed to be shown about bridle paths and trimming whiskers. Grooming to a gloss I could do, bathing wasn't that easy with only cold water and living in an area with a relatively chilly summer, and being pastured in a CA dry lot (mud or dust lot). I also had a heck of a time keeping that horse in decent weight, she was always bony in spots. But I did try to have us look our best at any sort of show or event. Neat clean and tidy.
    At the ASB barn the standard is waaaay up there - and the horses are kept up pretty much 24/7 to get that lovely look. Clipped, set, bagged, powdered, vaselined and shoe polished, they get out an hour or two a day, in the indoor so they don't mess themselves up. Lesson horses get a workout but the big show horses, um, I doubt it.
    I have some reservations about that.

    We Americans don't seem to do a happy medium very well.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,101

    Default

    Clipping is a personal thing, I clip the muzzle and ears as wel as the fetlocks but many people I know do not.

    I was able to get my chestnut clean and ready for a show with temps in the 40s. She didn't get a bath but she got groomed and towelled and went shiny.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,671

    Default

    I used to get my HB baby ready tied to my John Deere to get his socks clean ( bank barn, no wash stall(. Where there's a will ( he won the zone )
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,627

    Default

    I guess when all the children I see out in public with their parents are clean and dressed in something other than pajamas, maybe I'll start worrying about how other people prep their horses for public viewing. But probably not. To each their own.
    "Absent a correct diagnosis, medicine is poison, surgery is trauma and alternative therapy is witchcraft" A. Kent Allen
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/tailsofglory



Similar Threads

  1. Going rate for grooming at events
    By LookmaNohands in forum Eventing
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Sep. 17, 2012, 08:36 PM
  2. Replies: 14
    Last Post: May. 24, 2011, 08:24 AM
  3. Replies: 16
    Last Post: Apr. 27, 2011, 09:44 AM
  4. Turnout for events
    By lovetojump2611 in forum Eventing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Oct. 3, 2010, 04:47 PM
  5. Need your grooming and turnout tricks
    By dressagemom in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Apr. 10, 2010, 08:49 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness