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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    986

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    Quote Originally Posted by caryledee View Post
    But if you CAN clear up something without putting the horse on drugs, why not? I am not talking about a horse that is really suffering from the effects of allergies, but one that has some mild allergies. Especially for those competing.
    But those ARE drugs. Look at antimalarials - people used to take cinchona bark, which I guess in your opinion would not count as a drug. However, cinchona bark contains quinine, which we have used to our advantage and made quinine an antimalarial. I guess in your opinion that WOULD count as a drug.

    But if chinona bark contains quinine, does that make it a drug or not?

    Same with aspirin and willow bark. Or digitalis/foxglove and digoxin.

    Medicine does not eschew plant-derived compounds (or microbe-derived compounds--think botox!). What it does is study and purify compounds when possible to maximize benefit and minimize risk.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Former owner of the best Amish-carthorse-turned-eventer ever


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2008
    Posts
    457

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    I tried Spirulina last summer on two horses with fly allergies and noticed no difference. their legs would get scabs and one had the big sweet itch belly spot. Not much mane or tail rubbing. DD equimax doesn't do it either, by the way.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,440

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    Well, I know anecdotal evidence doesn't count for much but I have seen it make a huge difference in my friend's Appy. Said App had horrible seasonal allergies and would rub himself raw. Stop Itch herbs helped a little bit, Dex helped a little bit more, but the horse was still very itchy and rubbing his hair and sometimes skin off. One of my friends told me she had read something about spirulina helping horses with skin allergies, so I told Appy's owner, who was skeptical but figured, "meh, I'll give it a shot." After she started her horse on spirulina, he stopped ithcing, so she took him off the Dex--still no itching. Last year she ran out for a little while and he started rubbing himself bloody and raw, so she put him back on it and, again itching totally went away. Plus, it put an absolutely incredible bloom on his coat--shiny as a brand-new copper penny and covered in dapples. She's sold.


    3 members found this post helpful.

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