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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2007
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    Chapel Thrill, NC
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    86

    Default Would you buy a horse that had a history of rearing?

    Does rearing automatically mean 'too dangerous to ride?'

    This horse is really athletic but reared a few times with the previous rider. Could be a problem with her back. She had a mild case of EPM that was treated (and I thought resolved) 3 years ago.

    I'm also in love with her pedigree and I'd consider taking her just for breeding. But then, is that the kind of attitude that will get passed on to the baby?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
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    16,386

    Default

    That would be a big ol' "it depends" for me.

    Rearing as in getting a little light in front? Rearing as in straight up? Rearing as in actually going over backward?

    And did the rearing stop with treatment?

    A confirmed "I'm going to go up and over, my rider and myself be damned" even after treatment? Ah, no. No no no. Not worth it.

    Just a little light in front or something that resolved after EPM treatment? I am far more forgiving.


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2010
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    10

    Default

    I would (and have) bought (fallen in love with) horses who have rearing as a vice. It is a very dangerous vice but can be resolved if handled properly.

    It does sound like you're making the right approach and looking for the cause rather than a quick fix. Have your vet check it out. Consider buying her with a generous trial period while you try to hunt down the cause. (They should be somewhat flexible considering their mare is dangerous.)

    If a vet doesn't find an answer, it could be purely behavioral. That's not a bad thing, either. It just means she was never taught to offer the right answer and has always had rearing as an option. If you have access to an excellent trainer who is able to go back to the basics and virtually re-start her, you may find that her past rearing is all in the past. (I can give you the name of an excellent colt starter.)

    It's also possible that the EPM has affected her CNS causing lingering issues. If she was weakened during that time and never fully bounced back, she may just be struggling to keep up with the amount of work she is in and, frustrated, will act out.

    Having bred before, I can say that the mare's temperament is one of my top concerns. If you can rule out any issues which may be a result of how this mare was brought along, then consider it. Personally, I would like to see the mare capable of proving herself to some extent. Pedigree is nice but there are literally millions of horses with champion bloodlines.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
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    Area VI
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    1,751

    Default

    No. I know I'll probably be the minority, but no way. If it's pain related, that's one thing. But if its behavior, for me its a case of rear = refusal to go forward, 9 times out of 10. I'll take a forward buck any day over a rearer. I just don't like the fact that I'm getting a very strong "NO!". As someone said above, there are different types of rearers...light in the front where hooves may barely come off the ground, and all-out "I'm going up, dammit!" If the horse is the second type I won't give it another glance. First type I would want to know if it's a regular habit, or if its happened like, twice. Either way, I'd be hesitant. My TB has flung his head and got light in front, but never actually lifted off, and he was corrected quick fast and in a hurry for it. He doesn't get to say "NO!" I'll accept a "Uhhh, really?" but never a "NO!"

    Just my two cents.


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    1,284

    Default

    Nope. Occasional light in the front end is one thing, but I don't want to deal with anything beyond that. It's too dangerous, and god forbid you or the horse gets unbalanced and both of you go over backwards. I took a horse foxhunting that went up twice...black stallion clawing at the sky style. Nope nope nope nope nope.

    If nothing else, I want a forward thinking horse for eventing.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,880

    Default

    Nope. Been there, done that, have the broken heart to prove it. I spent over a year and a half trying to break the "habit" on my horse. Spent a fortune on finding a physical reason WHY he started standing up. Cried a lot of tears. Amazingly, no one ever got hurt on or near him (even when he pitched a giant hissy fit ON ASPHALT at a crazy busy jumper show). But I will not put myself through that again.

    A little light every now and then? Sure. They all will do that if given enough of a reason. But I'll take a bucker any day over a rearer.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2000
    Location
    Pawlet, VT US
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    3,495

    Default

    Nope. There are way too many nice horses out there that do not rear. Life's too short.
    madeline
    * What you release is what you teach * Don't be distracted by unwanted behavior* Whoever waits the longest is the teacher. Van Hargis



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
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    Rixeyville, VA
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    Default

    There are plenty of mares with good pedigrees out there. Why get one that rears?
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
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    Default

    What do you mean by history of rearing. A horse that HAS reared....once or twice when overly excited or felt trapped or a horse that stands up all the time?

    Honestly....a few times just raises an eyebrow for me for the PPE. I also have mostly youngsters.....and many many many horses will rear at some point in their early careers.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    Default

    I wouldn't take a rearer for free.


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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
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    4,273

    Default

    I've seen horses that will rear from habit, from pain, or from having been cooped up with no turnout.

    I would absolutely not put up with rearing as a vice. A small crow hop is one thing, or front legs coming off the ground a few inches. However, a full on, all the way up kind of thing? No way. It's too dangerous due to the possibility of flipping over backwards.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 1999
    Location
    Ohio: Charter Member - COTH Hockey Clique & COTH Buffy Clique
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    9,143

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RedDunRoanOvero View Post
    If a vet doesn't find an answer, it could be purely behavioral. That's not a bad thing, either. It just means she was never taught to offer the right answer and has always had rearing as an option. If you have access to an excellent trainer who is able to go back to the basics and virtually re-start her, you may find that her past rearing is all in the past. (I can give you the name of an excellent colt starter.)
    This sounds like a mare I know. She was actually returned to the breeder because she reared on the new buyer. Breeder was baffled as to the situation -- says she's never done that before. Eitehr case it became behavioral in that no one corrected her and showed her that was teh WRONG answer. She's a very smart mare and once she was told in no uncertain terms that rearing is the WRONG answer, she hasn't done it in more than 6 months and trainer is convinced she's over that "phase".
    ************
    "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

    "Get up... Get out... Get Drunk. Repeat as needed." -- Spike



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
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    8,675

    Default

    Rearing? That's a big question.

    What I would not buy is a lame horse that had EPM. Pass.


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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2001
    Location
    Dry Ridge, KY USA
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    Default

    No. I had a mare go over on me. I have a T-12 compression fracture to show for it. I will not have a horse that rears.
    When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2006
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    5,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by runNjump86 View Post
    No. I know I'll probably be the minority, but no way. If it's pain related, that's one thing. But if its behavior, for me its a case of rear = refusal to go forward, 9 times out of 10. I'll take a forward buck any day over a rearer.
    My sentiments.....EXACTLY!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    10,324

    Default

    Depends. Having seen some amazingly rude riders ( spell that ghastly) on sensitive, and soft mouthed horses, I may give the horse the benefit of the doubt.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2003
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    Nonsuch House
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    Default

    Nope, never. A friend of mine will never ride again and almost died when he thought he would "fix" a rearer. Horse went straight up and over on him with no reason, clear calm day, nothing going on, a group of riders stopped to talk and he went up and over.

    Another friend of mine with extensive training and riding was holding a horse that was a rearer when she went up and over breaking her neck. It only takes once to die.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."


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  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,354

    Default

    It doesn't matter why it happens or how far off the ground they go - a rear is a rear and you couldn't pay me to have one in the barn much less think of sitting on it.

    Too many nice horses in the world to risk dealing with that kind of behavior.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Azle, Teh-has
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    7,720

    Default

    negative.
    no questions asked.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2008
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    Area II, the Blue Ridge Mountains
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    Default

    I've bought several horse who reared and was able to basically get rid of the behavior with behavior modification. But i see it is a dominant fear response and it can come back and rear its ugly head (pun intended) if the stressors are great enough. So while I've had horses that stopped rearing, I always know that if it gets bad enough, they will do it again. What I think I have been able to fix is when a horse learns that rearing gets him/her away from something they don't want to do. I've got a "bag of tricks" for that, the main one being FORWARD, FORWARD, FORWARD, if the horse starts backing/hopping etc.

    My hunch is that rearing starts as backing up or as a response to pain/fear and then escalates with poor training. I've yet to have a horse that I started myself be a rearer. A young horse may try rearing, but it gets extinguished in short order.

    Mick's mother was terrible rearer, and I fixed it for the most part. However, later in life, if she got frightened, she would start to rear and then stop. When I got her, she had been through all sorts of cowboy stuff and they had try to flip her (she was so agile that they never could get her to tip over) as she reared. I just turned her around and shot forward. Horses can't rear if they are galloping, LOL.

    Not for the faint of heart.

    Ann



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