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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
    Posts
    4,680

    Default Woman doesn't know there is a stud in her pasture until two mares have foals!

    This is priceless:

    http://www.lex18.com/news/mystery-ho...prettyPhoto/0/


    A Bourbon County horse owner is trying to solve a mystery that could end up costing her thousands of dollars.

    Marilyn Montavon says someone apparently dropped off a stud on her farm, and he impregnated at least seven of her mares. The food and vet bills are mounting, and Montavon is angry.

    To feed, board, and take care of these horses, isn't cheap, and Montavon owns nearly 20 of them. they live here off Hawkins Cummins Road, fenced in on 50 acres.

    Monday, she discovered two new mouths to feed.

    "Immaculate conception?! I don't know what's going on!" Montavon said.

    Two of her mares had babies, but she doesn't own any studs. Then she noticed a horse that wasn't hers.
    Last edited by jenm; Apr. 25, 2013 at 09:19 PM. Reason: changed word
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Calera, AL
    Posts
    1,901

    Default

    If you don't notice a strange horse in your field, you might have too many horses! Good grief.
    "Dogs are man's best friend. Cats are man's adorable little serial killer." -- theoatmeal.com


    19 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
    Posts
    8,370

    Default

    all happend while her back was turned?



    I would say she has 20+ horses too many
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com


    8 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2011
    Posts
    117

    Default

    woops!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    She didn't notice all the pregnant bellies? Obviously she's not actually caring for them either. How much do you want to bet that the mares haven't had their feet trimmed in 11 months?


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,013

    Default

    That was an invisible horse, of course.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    3,494

    Default

    This story doesn't add up to me. Something is missing don't know what but...

    Perhaps the feeding farmhand was keeping a horse there without telling the boss. Or was paid to look the other way.

    Let's wait and see.
    Save Schrodinger's Cat!!!


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2005
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    4,811

    Default

    There are some gems in this state.....LOL.

    A couple of years ago, someone I know, found two horses walking down the road.
    She put them into the pasture (100 acres) with her two mares and called the owner of the horses. Rural KY BTW.

    Owner didn't come pick up his two horses until a few days after the call.

    11 months later the two mares gave birth to healthy colts.

    (It's all good, the foals found wonderful homes and are already gelded)

    ************************
    \"Horses lend us the wings we lack\"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    4,820

    Default

    "Then she noticed a horse that wasn't hers" ?

    11 ish months after the horse was part of the herd?

    Yikes!

    Perhaps she delegated her horses care, and those responsible were neglectful. It does say that it was her pasture...


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,571

    Default

    It's a MIRACLE!! One day a new horse shows up and the next her mares foal!! Shortest pregnancy on record!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,443

    Default

    No it was 11 months later (well more) that this horse remained undercover! The mares are not in the best of shape either. Several are very thin (despite their bellies) and a couple looked crippled or neurological (dark horses, maybe TB).
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2007
    Location
    Heaven on Earth--Sonoma County, CA
    Posts
    1,656

    Default

    I read the article in the local paper (Im at Rolex), and a few points:

    1) she doesn't care for her own horses consistently,but has live in caretakers who didn't notice the interloper. They live in a herd on a large, tree-copse-filled field.

    2) the photos show horses in good weight and flesh, with well-trimmed feet, etc. there are also extensive quotes from her long-term vet about her level of care, and her care of the newcomers. AC is involved, and have seen all the horses, and are working to determine who dumped the horse.

    3) once she found the stud colt, she caught him, stalled him, and found him a foster home. She didn't starve him, leave him for dead, or dump him at an auction. She is also paying to run DNA to try to find out who he is, and who may have dumped him.

    Not my way of caring for horses, nor a level of care I'd be satisfied with, but save your scorn for the scum who dumped an intact male into a stranger's pasture. Her horses are fine, if kept rusticaly.
    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com


    22 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Calera, AL
    Posts
    1,901

    Default

    Did the person that fed every day, caught them for trimming, etc, just not notice a new horse?

    Maybe the horses just eat round bales but unless the colt was really feral, you'd think he'd come in to be trimmed with the others. And I'd hope the farrier would point out certain things that the colt had that the others didn't. Kind of a, "hey, have you looked under here?"

    I don't know, it just seems weird. I guess I understand the woman wouldn't know since she's an absentee owner, but I'd be having a talk with my caretaker.
    "Dogs are man's best friend. Cats are man's adorable little serial killer." -- theoatmeal.com


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    33,601

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixFarm View Post
    I read the article in the local paper (Im at Rolex), and a few points:

    1) she doesn't care for her own horses consistently,but has live in caretakers who didn't notice the interloper. They live in a herd on a large, tree-copse-filled field.

    2) the photos show horses in good weight and flesh, with well-trimmed feet, etc. there are also extensive quotes from her long-term vet about her level of care, and her care of the newcomers. AC is involved, and have seen all the horses, and are working to determine who dumped the horse.

    3) once she found the stud colt, she caught him, stalled him, and found him a foster home. She didn't starve him, leave him for dead, or dump him at an auction. She is also paying to run DNA to try to find out who he is, and who may have dumped him.

    Not my way of caring for horses, nor a level of care I'd be satisfied with, but save your scorn for the scum who dumped an intact male into a stranger's pasture. Her horses are fine, if kept rusticaly.
    Part of horsekeeping is that you know how many heads in the herd, too!

    I guess the farrier just figured hey, one more...(does he not bill per head? Or only once a year?)

    I am sure care taker will have to do headcount every night now, and morning.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    1,776

    Default

    Good grief! Just think what would happen if she had teen girls and didn't notice the boys staying over in their rooms.

    Can we start a Most Clueless award for really bad horse owners like this one?
    Is chasing cattle considered playing with your food?.

    War veteran


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,717

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixFarm View Post
    3) once she found the stud colt, she caught him, stalled him, and found him a foster home. She didn't starve him, leave him for dead, or dump him at an auction. She is also paying to run DNA to try to find out who he is, and who may have dumped him.

    How about taking one more step. GELD HIM. It will make finding a foster home so much easier.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,950

    Default

    Even with the explanation provided by Phoenix it still does not add up for all the reasons people have posted already. Either there was no farrier work done in the last 11 months or they just ignored the horse that as not theirs? Was there no vet care (shots, etc) in the last 11 months? No one noticed the horse that was not theirs then either?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,521

    Default

    I don't know about you guys, but my farrier doesn't give a rat's ass if I had a new horse and wouldn't be pointing out to me that it was a stud. He would assume that I already knew that, since the horse is in my care...

    why would her farrier be pointing out to her that she had a stud? I didn't realize that was the farrier's job

    In addition to that, if she has 20-something horses and hires someone to care for the herd, then whoever is doing so probably just assumed she bought another one and threw it out with the rest of them.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    10 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,521

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Was there no vet care (shots, etc) in the last 11 months?
    My horses haven't seen a vet in 11 months either. They got spring shots last spring, and we've had no emergencies since, so, its been about a year since they've seen the vet. Should I be calling my vet out to see my horses regularly for no reason, just so I can say they haven't gone 11 months without seeing the vet?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    5 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    I don't know about you guys, but my farrier doesn't give a rat's ass if I had a new horse and wouldn't be pointing out to me that it was a stud. He would assume that I already knew that, since the horse is in my care...

    why would her farrier be pointing out to her that she had a stud? I didn't realize that was the farrier's job

    In addition to that, if she has 20-something horses and hires someone to care for the herd, then whoever is doing so probably just assumed she bought another one and threw it out with the rest of them.
    Not so much that the farrier would care, but the person in charge of taking care of the horses would notice an addition horse at that time. And maybe the person paying the bill (the owner) might notice an additional charge.

    It is time for a new worker if they assume a new horse in the field is the owner simply bought a new horse and they say nothing about it at all to the owner. I would think there would be more communication between the person in charge of the horses and the horse owner.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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