The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,380

    Default Synovitis

    Got this diagnosis yesterday for my boy's hocks. Vet said there was no "crunch" like an arthritic, degenerated bone when he put the needle in for the injections.

    He said the top joint was dry. The bottom joint had ok fluid but it was thin and watery. This is a better diagnosis than bones crumbling.

    Has anyone dealt with this? On line research didn't turn up much that seemed relevant to us. He has no swelling so does that mean it's not as bad as it might be/have gotten?

    Vet seemed very pleased with his findings. He injected both hocks, top bottom and hind.

    I can begin riding on Saturday.
    Ride like you mean it.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,091

    Default

    Dry joints are the biggest reason to get direct joint injections - put the cushion back as much as possible. Thin watery fluid is a close second reason

    These 2 are the most common findings when going in to inject hock joints. Just take things slowly bringing him back. He may not have visible signs of inflammation, but the fact that you went investigating tells me something is off, so there is SOME bit of inflammation somewhere. Give that a good week or so to settle down, let the chemicals do their work, then start back and ramp up over a week or so.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,380

    Default

    I was surprised that he said I could ride on Saturday...seemed a little soon. His only physical symptom was that he wouldn't make the 'jump' with his hind to make the transition into the lope. He would just trot faster. I always brought him back down after 30-40 feet. He's the type to take the cue readily: if I can't feel him organizing his feet and shifting his balance right away, then he's not going to. No need to trot all over, kicking his sides. Looking back he had other symptoms such as rushing and an unhappy face.

    My plan for the first couple of rides was just walk and jog. Now I'm thinking I'll just hand walk him around the arena a few times.

    I just noticed you're in Greensboro. He was born and raised there until he was 6. I brought him to Michigan. Small world!
    Ride like you mean it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,091

    Default

    Wow, how about that! LOL
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2009
    Location
    Currituck NC
    Posts
    1,340

    Default

    We've always been told for arthritic horses that lots of long and low trot work is the best way to bring them back from an injection...usually a week or so taking it slow before moving onto more demanding work with no lunging. Of course...not sure if it would be different for your situation.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,380

    Default

    Jumpergirl221,

    Vet wasn't specific as to what to do/not do. In the past he has advocated for "long, straight lines at the trot". I think that will be my starting place. Our school is approx. 200x200 feet. I can walk the corners. I'm going to give him Saturday and ride for 10-15 minutes on Sunday. Today is his first day being turned out and 2nd day after injections.
    Ride like you mean it.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,091

    Default

    The deal about time off after injections isn't that work is going to hurt, it's that the time off will give the chemicals time to do an upfront job, which is to reduce inflammation. Get all you can for that $$$ you're spending and just give a few days, at least, off work. My vet really wants them to have normal turnout but no forced work for a week, then ramp up, but she understands that performance horses in show season can't always do that, and she'll never tell those guys that immediately returning to work is going to hurt.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: May. 25, 2010, 07:03 PM
  2. Replies: 104
    Last Post: Mar. 22, 2004, 01:35 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness