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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulk View Post
    I dont know the dynamics at the barn where you board are but what I wonder is....

    Is the BO there alone? in other words would the BO have the potential to deal with this horse alone in the future. Even if the horse is pastured alone someone has to walk him in and out. I personally would not feel comfortable having someone else assume the danger involved in handling such a horse. At least when this happened there were multiple persons available to deal with it at the time.

    I am sorry you are in this position.
    Thank you again, all of you...am appreciating all of your thoughts and warm wishes, and feel far less alone when I hear from other people who have gone through the same thing.
    To handle on the ground he is a kitten, though if he sees something he wants to explore you have to growl at him to remember his manners as he wants to lead the way. Nothing that worries me in the least. Complete darling with BO's granddaughter. Friend who shares the house ADORES him, and is devastated about the whole deal...we are going to have some long talks, and I am so sorry about how hurt he is. He is in fact the strong confident rider who would be PERFECT for my boy, but he is a competetive rider who does not need a pleasure mount.
    The risk for my BO is multiple..not the handling on the ground, but the risk if he decides to do this again. Yesterday it was my gelding...but what happens if he takes exception to someone else's horse? Granted we are a small family there, but even so....I am almost considering myself lucky that the injuries are only flesh wounds that will heal. I would never, never have believed it if it hadn't happened right in front of me. Where it is also a risk for my BO is if she is home alone (which is often the case) - she does not deserve to be put into the position of having to go out and deal with this scenario by herself. She is a confident horsewoman, but I have to be fair to her too. And to my DSO...had he not slowed down gelding's mad backwards scramble I would have been right in the path of it.
    D.
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by candyappy View Post
    Would you volunteer to put your horse in with him to test the " one time incident theory"?? I wouldn't. These horses have shared a common fence and been fine for a while now and even had turn out together with no issues. This isn't the type of horse I could in good conscience pass on to someone else, unless they knew of everything he did and were willing to risk him with their horses. Good Luck With That.

    Don't beat yourself up OP, sometimes the right decision with our horses is the hardest one . You have given him many good years despite the fact you don't enjoy riding him.
    Thanks, CA. One correction I will make is that they shared common fenceline for two days before this. Because I saw no signs of problems, I then introduced him to each of his new pasture-mates individually, and then together with no incident. However, the gelding who this is about has MANY times been in herds where new members have been introduced (often with far less acquaintance time) with no issues. Thank you for your kind words as well.
    D.
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  3. #43
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeThbd View Post
    Yesterday turned into one of those days that every horseman dreads: deciding that it is time to put a sound, healthy horse down. I'd like some input if anyone has other solutions to offer, but after lengthy discussion with my DSO (who comes with me daily to the barn and is my "cheerleader" for my love of horses) and my BO, we each feel that this is the best decision for my gelding.
    I do self-care at a fairly private farm; I have a small barn with a few acres of turnout and one small additional paddock. My BO does morning turnout for me, and we go nightly to do stalls and mess with our boys.
    We have three OTTB geldings. We lost our oldest gelding a few days before Christmas, and though we had decided to stay at two horses, a horse who truly needed a home came into our lives a month ago - he is lovely, kind and sweet. We did QT for a month on a separate property - it wasn't cheap, but we felt it was necessary as he had been in the kill pen.
    We brought him home on Sunday, and put him into our stall that has the small paddock attached. This shares a common fenceline with the rest of our turnout. Our other two other geldings seemed delighted to have a new friend. My 14yo (who this is about) especially seemed happy. All three are able to make nose contact through the top half of their stalls, and settled in quietly. For the first day, the other two got familiar with the new boy on the shared fence line. There were the requisite squeals and prancing, and everybody settled in quickly.
    The next day, same thing....everybody was happy and quiet with the fence separating them. Oldest gelding and new boy even lay down in the sun together and slept in the sun. Middle gelding hung out near them.
    MOnday night, we turned the new boy out individually with each of the other geldings - again, requisite minor squeals, a bit of trotting, and everybody was quiet and happy. We put out all three together afterwards, and everybody just wandered around as if they had been lifetime friends. New boy settled in quietly at the round balewhile the other two begged for supper while we did chores.
    Yesterday, we decided to continue the positive experience and put them out together again while we did chores. For the first ten minutes, same thing...everybody hanging out, munching hay or wandering around.
    Oldest gelding started asserting his authority with the new guy, who did everything right...showed submission, moved away, and so on. Oldest gelding started getting more into it - moving up the speed and aggression of his actions. Youngest gelding kept on trying to be a good citizen and not retaliating. He got to the point where he was sprinting to stay out of the way - older gelding would keep up the pursuit. It got to the point where oldest gelding tried to put him through the fence three times, got him cornered and biting him HARD several times, and driving him and holding onto his back with his teeth at a full gallop. As things escalated, younger horse fired a few warning shots where he could have connected, and finally nailed him once in self-defense. This was at the level that I would term savaging - ears pinned, jaws wide, holding onto any part he could get his teeth into.
    I've had oldest gelding for 8 years....I got him under the impression that he was a quiet, bombproof ride, and he is anything but. He needs a strong, confident rider with a skill set that I don't have, as I find him reactive and difficult. He is beautiful, athletic, and is also missing one eye. He is normally EXTREMELEY social with others - we've had him in situations with other horses at different farms, and although he has been in-your-face, he has never offered to be nasty before.
    Yesterday became dangerous....the ONLY reason he stopped was that he got tired. I caught him and handed him to DSO who went to bring him in....he went into the barn quietly and then bolted backwards dragging DSO facedown until he let go (DSO is a big guy and realized I was about to get flattened while bringing in middle gelding). Caught him again and he was quiet.
    New gelding is torn to ribbons along is back and hindquarters - he has one bite on his hip that looks like someone took an xacto knife to him, about 8 inches long. We cleaned him up and gave him some bute, but he was already swelling up nicely to where he probably wont be able to have a saddle on for the next week.
    Older gelding has one role...to be a companion horse. I have always made a promise of lifetime homes for my boys. We (various combinations of myself, DSO and BO) have discussed various scenarios to see if we can fnd a solution. Individual turnout for him does not seem to be an option because he constantly tests fences (fence replacement is planned for late summer), and will scream and fret if he is in separate turnout. Living like that would be unfair to him....and if I move barns one day - finding an appropriate boarding situation would be challenging to say the least. Giving him away - I don't feel would be responsible for either him or a future owner. I would have NO control over where he went after he left - and there are far nicer horses than him going for meat in my area. After yesterday's events, him being a companion horse is off the books. I don't even want to think what would have happened had we not all been tere yesterday. I asked my BO for her honest opinion - she said that he would have been on a truck today.
    We have agreed that putting him down is the best solution...it sounds cold, and calculated and heartless, but when I try to find any other options I come back to the same conclusion over and over. I can't take the gamble that yesterday was a one-off and that he'll never do it again, or risk that he will hurt someone even unintentionally while going after another horse. I am making one call to a rescue a couple of hours away to see if they have any other suggestions...if any of you have them I'd be glad to hear them. Please don't slam me for my decision....DSO and I have shed a lot of tears over this.
    Just do it. You don't need our justification or anyone's. I would do the same.


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  4. #44
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    FWIW, we had a "middle aged" gelding decide one day that he would begin running the other horses he'd been turned out with. It was as you described: the snake head, teeth bared, doing damage whenever he could and running the other horses non-stop for over 45 minutes in a several acre paddock until I managed to corner him and catch him. (I had to let the other horses into another paddock whenever they came nearby but he couldn't follow.) We were lucky that the outcome wasn't worse than very tired horses with some bite marks.

    But the thing was he never could be trusted out with the herd after that. Even turned out alone next to them, he'd charge the fence and threaten every way he could. I don't know what switch flipped in his brain, since he'd been turned out with that group for months. Shortly after the incident the boarder moved to another barn for unrelated reasons. Frankly, I was very relieved.

    Honestly, I applaud you for thinking through all the ramifications of this horse's behavior and your willingness to make a very responsible decision.
    They don't call me frugal for nothing.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.


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  5. #45
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    Hhhmmmmmmmm, this is a hard one for sure. However, and maybe this is because I can imagine what I would do and my horses are at home and not boarded out, but I know that I could not give up on a horse after one incident like that - no matter how awful and horrible it seemed at the time. In a boarding situation "maybe" I would think a bit differently.... but probably not. I would most likely move my horse to somewhere different and try somewhere else before saying "that's it - it's time to say goodbye". But - since my horses are at home, and I am reading all of this thinking "what would I do?" Here is what I think.

    First of all, horses are horses. They can be territorial, agressive, outright nasty. In the wild they would kill each other if it came to that. Just because other times this horse never showed aggression like this with other new arrivals, doesn't just all of a sudden mean that his cheese has suddenly slid off the cracker this time around. There could very well be a real good explanation - and if we could talk horse we might just see his point of view.

    If it happened to me with my group, here is what I would do. I would go back to keeping the new horse in the paddock beside the two regulars. Maybe two days was just not long enough. And then after maybe a week I would try the new horse with the aggressive one only..... don't put all three together yet. I would wait another week or so, see how that goes.... and then try all three again provided the two together seem okay.

    The other thing I would consider is like what other people have already said, maybe talk to your vet and see what their thoughts are about the behaviour change. Although, I suspect it's not behavioural in the way that something has just snapped in his brain.

    Also, why do you think this horse ran backwards when your DSO had him? Was he spooking at something? Or was he running backwards to try and get back to the other horses? Or??? If that is the first time he has ever done that, well I'd give him a second chance with that as well. I have had my horses run backwards, almost run over me, stampede off in other directions, spook and shy away.... all sorts of things have happened over the years. To me it's just part of owning and being around horses - you are going to get scraped up and maybe even trodden on now and then

    Just my opinion - although it doesn't seem a very popular one on here when reading all of the other comments.


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  6. #46
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    I forgot to add - I happen to have a very very very aggressive gelding. And I mean AGGRESSIVE. Actually, he is a bully. I also call him a bunch of other names, but they would likely get my post deleted if I shared them here

    Anyway, this gelding almost KILLED another gelding the first day we put them together. And you know what - I never tried them again. But that was because the other gelding that was almost killed was not mine - he was a borrowed horse from my farrier. They started out okay. Or so it seemed for the first 5 minutes or so. But then the old gelding (which was a 14.2 hand Morgan) decided that this new hot shot was definitely not going to be taking over command.... and the war ensued. The new horse was a very large draft horse - and apparently he felt that this little short thing was no match. Luckily we were all there ready with lunge whips (as this was the first introduction) but even before we could really intervene - it got very ugly. The new horse ended up throwing the old horse to the ground! And I mean hard!!! He took his front feet, placed them on the back of the Morgan, and shoved with all his might. That Morgan flew to the ground so hard I thought he was dead. I remember it like it was yesterday as I was standing right there beside them, screaming and yelling! The Morgan hit the ground and didn't move, I could see him out of the corner of my eye.... and all I could think was that this horse just killed my friends horse and OMG how am I going to explain this.... but I stood there and kept the new horse back with my whips. Well the Morgan finally got up (I think he was just very winded) and then what did he do? He ran right back at the new horse full tilt!!! He would not give up! And can't say I blame him - he was the king and had been living there the longest. So in his mind this was his territory and his place. It's what horses do unfortunately. Some horses anyway. So, we managed to get them apart and then took out the Morgan. He left screaming and fighting and trying to get back in that field - he was not done! The new horse (the bully) was quite happy and suddenly so sure of himself. It wasn't until a month or two later that I found out that the new horse who was 5 yrs old at the time had only just been gelded less than 8 months before we got him.... and my friends horse was a stallion until he was 14 years old!!! So essentially, without knowing, I threw two stallions (in mind and spirit) together without knowing it - and had a mare there in the wings to get the war started .

    So I determined that I will never put this gelding out with other geldings again - unless there are no mares around at all.

    Just a story about a horrible experience I had - but I will say that if they were my horses (as in the Morgan was mine as well) I wouldn't have given up as quick..... to be fair I didn't give these horses an opportunity to meet and hang out over a fence, because at the time where we were located, that wasn't a possibility. So I was also partly to blame.



  7. #47
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    Dec. 11, 2006
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    This may sound odd, but is the new horse a different color perhaps?

    I have a story regarding a friend's teen-aged QH gelding. We board and last year, 2 new horses came in, both appaloosas. The QH was introduced to the appys over a period of 2 days. All seemed fine, then the QH began savaging one of the appys. Chasing the appy relentlessly, ripping off large chunks and long strips of skin and hair, leaving a bloody mess. The appy who was savaged is chestnut with a white butt. The appy who was ignored looks like a light roan, almost white. The chestnut, white butt appy wasn't able to be ridden for quite awhile due to the wounds on his back. I witnessed it happening and could hardly believe what I was seeing, it was really horrible to watch. I had known the QH for 4 years prior and had never heard of him acting like this. I was the only one at the barn at the time, was able to catch the QH and get him to his stall, and call the owners of the horses involved.

    The QH was moved to a different paddock containing 2 geldings (a grey and a fjord) with whom he had been turned out with before in the past. There have been no incidents since.

    The QH owner figures maybe her gelding has an issue with appys? A horse of a different color, so to speak? This was the first appy this horse has ever been turned out with in the 10 years or so the owner has had him.

    I know I probably sound crazy, but my mare has a dislike for grey horses...doesn't "savage" them, but will pin her ears, turn her butt, lift a hind leg and threaten them if they get too close in turn out.

    The QH owner also thinks the introduction was too quick, should have taken place over a few weeks, instead of a few days. But in a boarding situation, we don't always have control over these things. Fortunately, the boarding stable has multiple paddocks and was able to make accommodations for all horses involved. This incident has been noted and will not be forgotten regarding any future paddock changes for this QH.

    I agree with what others have said, I personally would have a vet look at the gelding, to rule out any unknown, treatable medical issues before making any decisions since this seems out of character for your gelding from what you have written. I feel for you in making this decision.



  8. #48
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    OP you are seriously brave for posting this. You do not need any validation for keeping yourself, the people in your life, and your animals safe. To be quite honest, had this exact scenario happened with me and my DH, the horse wouldn't have lived out the hour...DH would have shot him right then and there, and I wouldn't have stopped him.

    I agree some horses can't be turned out together. I am VERY fortunate my two geldings get along, but I have to be careful about when and where my TB is out. He cannot be turned out at the same time my trainer's show horse is, even though they are in separate (adjoining) pastures because they both charge the fence (7' chain link with electric tape on both sides) and threaten each other. He cannot be within reach of a mare (but is fine with electric tape). He IS a gelding, but he is extremely studly-acting, and I am contemplating getting his testosterone checked because of it. However, if he EVER attacked a horse, even my other gelding who is his BFF and who he calls for over and over again if he leaves, I wouldn't hesitate to put him down that day. That type of dangerous behavior, IMHO, is so unpredictable that even if you take every precaution, there will always be "what ifs". In my case, what if he managed to get loose at a show and maimed or killed another horse? What if he managed to escape from his corral at night and started a fight with my trainer's FEI horse over the fence? What if he tried to mount a mare over the fence? What if he kicked the fence so hard doing his "stud muffin routine" he hurt himself...again? What if he lost his damn mind in a busy warm-up pen and went after another horse?

    OP you are making the right decision. Bypass the rescue, and go with your gut. Jingles for you.


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  9. #49
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    Telling stories of unexplained severe aggression, I had this older super soft, submissive gelding, the kind that, if you leave a gate open, he will stand there asking for permission to go thru.

    We got this 5 year old, that we kept across the fence from our other then three geldings for several days.
    All seemed fine, no one even squealed, they stood asleep next to the fence by the new horse.
    One morning, I put out many flakes, more than horses and opened the gates.
    The new horse walked over to one flake, then ran across the pen, grabbed the bottom of the herd older sweet gelding by his neck, knocking him into the fence and to the ground, kneed on him and went to shaking him by the neck.
    I got to them, ran the new horse off and put him back by himself.
    The old gelding had a scrape on his neck and was sore for a few days.

    The new horse was sold to a ranch with a herd of bossy ranch geldings, where they taught him some manners in a hurry and without any hair loss.
    They still have him, all those years later, now a more "educated" and polite horse and as long as he is in the right herd for him.

    Some horses, you can manage, others, well, the risk to other horses and whoever may be caught in the middle is not worth having them around.

    "Once a horse tells you who they are, believe them" has always made good sense.


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  10. #50
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    I would be very hesitant to euthanize over a single incident in turn-out given that there were never any prior problems and the horse is pleasant to handle.

    A number of years ago, I sold a nearly 3 year old Fjord gelding that I bred to a dressage rider. There were no issues with him from birth and he always lived out in a herd. Fast forward two years later, he started having issues with his herd and began bullying an older horse. He actually knocked the horse down. I was stunned at the news, but completely believed the owner. She was not set up for separate turn-out and couldn’t keep him. I ended up trading another gelding for him.

    He was turned out in field with other horses when he arrived. There was no problem and he was a beta for years. I do change my groups around and at the moment, he is in field where he is alpha. There have been no observed incidents of bullying or problems with him and any other horse in the last 4 years. He had gone onto a successful career in dressage and eventing. He’s a lovely horse.

    I don’t pretend to understand horse logic, but I do know that there are field combinations that don’t work. I have no idea why, but it is what it is. I’ve seen pecking orders change radically in new combinations. My guess is the older gelding should not be turned out with the younger gelding because it’s just a bad combination.

    I totally respect a decision to euthanize, but given that the older gelding handles like “a kitten” on the ground and is well liked by other boarders, I would not act in haste. I would not label the older gelding a vicious horse that attacks other horses. He attacked one specific horse. My guess is that he would attack him again because the dynamic has been established. I do understand that the older gelding needs a strong, confident rider but that shouldn’t preclude his being able to thrive in a new situation. I could see it if he were a rank horse in many levels, but the story presented doesn’t indicate that. Is he a good fit for the OP? Probably not, but he might be fine elsewhere. I guess I would try to find him a new situation before summarily putting him down.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


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  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post
    I would be very hesitant to euthanize over a single incident in turn-out given that there were never any prior problems and the horse is pleasant to handle.

    A number of years ago, I sold a nearly 3 year old Fjord gelding that I bred to a dressage rider. There were no issues with him from birth and he always lived out in a herd. Fast forward two years later, he started having issues with his herd and began bullying an older horse. He actually knocked the horse down. I was stunned at the news, but completely believed the owner. She was not set up for separate turn-out and couldn’t keep him. I ended up trading another gelding for him.

    He was turned out in field with other horses when he arrived. There was no problem and he was a beta for years. I do change my groups around and at the moment, he is in field where he is alpha. There have been no observed incidents of bullying or problems with him and any other horse in the last 4 years. He had gone onto a successful career in dressage and eventing. He’s a lovely horse.

    I don’t pretend to understand horse logic, but I do know that there are field combinations that don’t work. I have no idea why, but it is what it is. I’ve seen pecking orders change radically in new combinations. My guess is the older gelding should not be turned out with the younger gelding because it’s just a bad combination.

    I totally respect a decision to euthanize, but given that the older gelding handles like “a kitten” on the ground and is well liked by other boarders, I would not act in haste. I would not label the older gelding a vicious horse that attacks other horses. He attacked one specific horse. My guess is that he would attack him again because the dynamic has been established. I do understand that the older gelding needs a strong, confident rider but that shouldn’t preclude his being able to thrive in a new situation. I could see it if he were a rank horse in many levels, but the story presented doesn’t indicate that. Is he a good fit for the OP? Probably not, but he might be fine elsewhere. I guess I would try to find him a new situation before summarily putting him down.
    ^^^^^^^^ THIS!!!!!

    Also, was the gelding that did the attacking of the new horse quite attached to the old horse that passed away just before Christmas??? Maybe there is something going on there as well.... just an idea.


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  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefilly View Post
    ^^^^^^^^ THIS!!!!!

    Also, was the gelding that did the attacking of the new horse quite attached to the old horse that passed away just before Christmas??? Maybe there is something going on there as well.... just an idea.
    They were friends, but he is far more friends with my other gelding. Regarding handles like a kitten...I realize I am going to sound like I am backtracking, but I meant relative to the behaviour I saw that precipitated this whole mess. He needs frequent reminders to mind his manners, and then is good for a long time. He always has to be first to come in, but usually just pins his ears at his pal and life is good.
    I wish rehoming him were an option: but with a resumé like his, and with my genuine doubt that he would have a good ending, I feel like I have few choices.
    Finding someone who would commit to a 14yo OTTB gelding with one eye, 15.3, for a confident, experienced rider who is not a safe bet in turnout in company and who would fret alone would be a tough sell.
    D.
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/


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  13. #53
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    I think you should do what your gut tells you. I wouldn't pass him on to a person or a rescue.
    Best wishes, I know it's difficult, but PTS seems to me to be the best option.
    Whatever you decide... ((((hugs)))


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  14. #54
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    I agree that placing this horse may not be easy, but I sure would try before I summarily euthanized. I think the problem is that he is a bad fit for the OP and that colors what she thinks he could do or who would want him. I don't think the lack of an eye, the size or the need for an experienced rider is hard to overcome. I also don't think that one incident in a pasture makes him unsafe to turnout in company. Everything that has been mentioned in manageable. I hope the gelding is given a second chance to find another home.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


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  15. #55
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    I think the problem is that he is a bad fit for the OP and that colors what she thinks he could do or who would want him.
    If you think horses such as this are so easy to place why don't you take him Ironwood? I can tell you in my neck of the woods, small, difficult, one-eyed thoroughbreds, agressive in turnout situations are NOT in demand. This horse would end up at a slaughter auction within a week. Thoroughbreds are a dime a dozen here, and the ones with issues are impossible to place. I would euthanize this horse without a qualm. He's 14, you've given him 7 good years, that's more than many horses get.


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  16. #56
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    I rode plenty of small one-eyed OTTBs when I was taking riding lessons. The horse has only been aggressive ONCE in turn-out. I guess I don't give up that easily on a horse. I do have a horse that was very aggressive once in turnout and he has done fine subsequently. I'm certainly glad I didn't euthanize him immediately. Obviously the OP can and will do whatever she wants with her horse. It just struck me that the decision was made in haste and without taking a look at other possible options. And if the OP wants to ship him to me to field board, I am happy to take him as a boarder.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


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  17. #57
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    Can't use this horse for lessons unless you have an advanced rider. That alone makes him difficult to place, everything else aside. Maybe a collegiate riding program?? Even then...there are likely plenty of green, easier to ride, younger OTTBs being basically given away every day.

    Either way, I second what has been said by others: We were NOT there, we did not see this happen and the fact that the OP has come to this decision as a horse lover who has given him 7 years....well, that speaks volumes to me...she doesn't know any of us from Adam's off ox. I realize she came on here with a pretty hot button issue but cut someone a break, folks. Only other horse folks are gonna get this thing that's weighing heavy. YOU might not handle the situation the way she's leaning but YOU aren't wearing her shoes.


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  18. #58
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    Ironwood, I appreciate your offer...thank you.
    I had a long conversation with my vet tonight, outlining the situation and the events from earlier in the week. I asked him what options might help, and he said that perhaps sedation might work, but it becomes expensive very quickly and is not a real solution.
    He asked me a question that I will share with you, and that I hope that each and every person who has read or contributed to this thread will contemplate, in case you are ever in my place. I hope to God that none of you are....where you question your judgment, your worthiness as an equestrian, and your own values.
    He asked me "Are you willing to lose everything you have worked hard for? Because now that you are aware of what he can do, you are liable should anything ever happen." He included rehoming him in that - that ultimately, if he were to hurt anybody, that would be the case.
    I KNOW that owning horses - hell, being alive - comes with risks. We accept and minimize them as much as possible. As my BO said, this isn't just about him - it's about every horse and human there. She is right.
    When I got to the barn, one of my friends who is every experienced with racing thoroughbreds came by. She wasn't aware of what had gone on earlier in the week, but after I told her she related the story of a horse she had very briefly. When she integrated him into her small group, he tried to pick a fight with another horse, and ultimately ended up with a shattered leg. She wishes she could have prevented it. I feel very fortunate that what happened ended up with cuts and bruises, and not more. Grateful that each time he was driven into the fence, he managed to stop himself from going through and get away.
    I promised this horse a good life, and I gave it to him. He never lacked for care, comfort, friendship and peace. The last gift I can give him is a kind and gentle crossing surrounded by friends. My DSO will be there with me, as he feels that when we sign on, we sign on.
    I know that I am disappointing and upsetting some people, but ultimately I have to make a decision that will allow me to sleep well at night.
    Thank you, each one, for your help.
    D.
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/


    4 members found this post helpful.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,668

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    Everyone has pretty much covered anything I could add...just remember...it costs the same to feed and maintain a horse you can't ride, is difficult to handle and potentially dangerous in some situations. A peaceful passing is superior - in my mind - to an unknown future out in the real/cruel world. Death is quick...a long suffering of starving and bad treatment is a much worse fate. You will make the right choice.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
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    Co
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    Thinking of you OP.
    I agree that passing him on, just in case someone will keep him alive, could easily do more damage to him, and to those people who would be involved, than the chance is worth.
    Tough situation, and I think you've thought it through carefully and had good advice from your trusted friends, and your vet (with opinions from the COTH peanut gallery thrown in).



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