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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
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    259

    Default Doping story on NPR

    I heard this on my way home today.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/04/23/178622...nned-in-europe

    As a person who has zero track experience (outside the grandstand) I'd appreciate hearing the opinions of those of you who have first hand knowledge. Thanks!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2011
    Location
    racetrack
    Posts
    1,495

    Default

    Wow. This "Rarick" lady sounds like a dumba**.

    "Every horse in America starts his day with a shot or two in the neck."

    Um... No, actually they don't. I don't know of ANY racehorse that starts his day off like that... This woman needs to get out more.

    I really disliked how Dale Romans was framed as a "bad guy" in the article, I have a lot of respect for the man as a trainer.
    *sigh*
    I guess I shouldn't take it so seriously anymore, same ol' BS from the uneducated.

    Thanks for posting though, entertaining at least.

    "Pat the horse; kick yourself" - Carl Hester


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2005
    Posts
    340

    Default

    To say "every horse in America starts his day with a shot or two in the neck" is a complete and outright lie! Lasix is not what is detrimental to racing, the public perception of this drug is insanely exaggerated. I am not saying our industry is perfect, far be it, but banning Lasix is not the answer. The bleeding hearts are barking up the wrong tree. Our training regimen and whole racing operations are so grossly opposite of the Euros that is is hardly comparible. You can't have any reasonable comparisons when you are dealing with apples and oranges, simple as that! My first hand knowledge of galloping and being a assistant trainer for over thirty years, seven days a week, sun up to sundown.
    Forward is good


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,409

    Default

    It's NPR. Europe good, America BAD. They probably skipped over Godolphin's European runners testings positive for banned drugs.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    259

    Default

    Thanks guys, I felt like something was off, but couldn't say for sure. What's the whole bleeding into the lungs thing about though? (sorry if this is common knowledge, I live in H\J land so I'm clueless about racing)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,000

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    It's NPR. Europe good, America BAD. They probably skipped over Godolphin's European runners testings positive for banned drugs.
    I don't see how you're getting that from NPR. There are stories on problems in Europe daily.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,000

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by summerly View Post
    To say "every horse in America starts his day with a shot or two in the neck" is a complete and outright lie! Lasix is not what is detrimental to racing, the public perception of this drug is insanely exaggerated. I am not saying our industry is perfect, far be it, but banning Lasix is not the answer. The bleeding hearts are barking up the wrong tree. Our training regimen and whole racing operations are so grossly opposite of the Euros that is is hardly comparible. You can't have any reasonable comparisons when you are dealing with apples and oranges, simple as that! My first hand knowledge of galloping and being a assistant trainer for over thirty years, seven days a week, sun up to sundown.
    Can you elaborate on this, and its role in bleeding in the lungs? I am not being snarky, but genuinely curious.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 29, 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    775

    Default

    I find the 100 percent acceptance of lasix in American racing to be a bit odd. IMO, all it does is perpetuate the genetics that lead horses to bleed when worked hard. This cannot be good for the breed.
    co-author of
    Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry
    www.duelforthecrown.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 21, 2013
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    221

    Default

    I heard this yesterday as well and feel like I agreed with the program. I've been a racing aficionado for years and still don't understand why they need Lasix to run. Don't get me wrong, i'm not asking this question as a bleeding heart.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,907

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Button View Post
    Thanks guys, I felt like something was off, but couldn't say for sure. What's the whole bleeding into the lungs thing about though? (sorry if this is common knowledge, I live in H\J land so I'm clueless about racing)
    http://www.ker.com/library/advances/435.pdf
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous



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