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  1. #21
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    Pronunciation aside, I love my Amerigo CC!

    (which I pronounce Ameruhgo)



  2. #22
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    This thread cracks me up.

    I specifically do not know how to pronounce Amerigo (well I do now), so I would always refer to my moms saddle as A-mare-geo, Amer eee go, amer igio...whatever it's called.

    Sometimes if you have been pronouncing something wrong for so long, it just feels wrong to say it the other way. Like Breyers, I have always called them Bray-ers, where I have heard the correct pronunciation is Bry -er. I don't care, I can't bring myself to call them that.



  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    It is rude to not bother to learn to pronounce words from another language as native speakers would. You'd hate it if they bastardized English, right? If so, some Golden Rule applies. Exert yourself.
    .
    Oh, please.

    I'm not being spiteful when I don't pronounce things correctly. I'm just pronouncing it as it looks like it would be pronounced in the language I speak. If someone wants to correct me, fine, but I'm not going to go around saying Ah-Ma-REE-go, even if that's the way it's "supposed" to be said.

    Language is fluid and pronunciation can be as well. I'm pretty sure I don't say Mercedes that same way as the Germans or the Italians or the English....and it's not rude that I don't.
    Last edited by RugBug; Apr. 24, 2013 at 02:57 PM.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


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  4. #24
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    Being english im used too all the wrong pronunciation,watching tele is a daily screaming
    match .and the H in herb isnt silent ! It's HERB not erb .that is all
    Shall we all scream at your abuse of English grammar as well?


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    Rudeness and wadded panties abound!

    It is rude to not bother to learn to pronounce words from another language as native speakers would. You'd hate it if they bastardized English, right? If so, some Golden Rule applies. Exert yourself.

    It is also rude, though a bit less of a sin, to give an unsolicited correction.

    It's stupid in a shoot-yourself-in-the-foot way (as well as elitist) to assume that because someone screws up the pronunciation of an unfamiliar term, they are incompetent.

    And that's the fact, jack.
    If I were a sales rep for A mer eee go. I would definitely work to pronounce it properly with the accent as well. (some would probably sound goofy however). I think the company should have their reps learn to pronounce the name of their brand properly. I have friends from many backgrounds and I always bug them on how to say things in their language. They never seem offended, actually seem very enthusiastic to offer the lessons. I have friends that speak Mandarin and say I do very well pronouncing words. It's fun.

    I don't get offended if someone pronounces something wrong in English. I have Spanish friends that will ask me how to pronounce certain words and they really do try. I think sometimes it's hard for people because of their native language to pronounce certain sounds.

    But again, I think if I were a rep I would work hard to at least pronounce the thing I am selling correctly. But as a customer, I wouldn't let it stop me from buying the saddle. I guess I can say it's good I bought a CWD, that's pretty difficult to pronounce incorrectly

    And do agree that it's rude to give an unsolicited correction.
    Don't saw on your horses mouth it's not a piece of wood! ~ GM



  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    Oh, please.

    I'm not being spiteful when I don't pronounce things correctly. I'm just pronouncing it as it looks like it would be pronounced in the language I speak. If someone wants to correct me, fine, but I'm not going to go around saying Ah-Ma-REEG-o, even if that's the way it's "suppose" to be said.

    Language is fluid and pronunciation can be as well. I'm pretty sure I don't say Mercedes that same way as the Germans or the Italians or the English....and it's not rude that I don't.
    Yabbut, wouldn't it bum you out if someone continually mispronounced your name and when given the correct pronunciation, got all up in your grill and instead "took ownership" of your name by insisting that they got to say it their way?

    Geez. It's not that hard.

    And another thing! Making some attempt to get another language's term right reminds everyone that the speaker's native tongue and culture ain't the only game in town.

    If Italians invented a saddle nice enough for you to want to ride in, why not give them credit?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Shoot, I was a northerner who moved south.

    Lebanon
    North: Leb-a-NON
    South: Leb-nin

    Lafayette
    North: Lah-fay-YETTE
    South: Lah- FAY- it

    Shelbyville
    North: Shelby-ville
    South: SHEB-v'l (Can't even type that one! Maybe more like SHEB-vul)

    Santa Fe
    North: Santa - FAY
    South: Santa FEE

    Anyway, I could go on, but even here in 'Merica we all speak regionally. No biggy.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    You'd hate it if they bastardized English, right
    No. "Hate?" No. It doesn't even bother me, honestly. I appreciate it when people make an effort to SPEAK English, my profession is extremely diverse, and it is not at all uncommon to have people attending meetings and have small groups reverting to their native tongues...leaving the rest of us wondering what they are talking about.

    THAT'S what I find rude, when we've agreed upon a language for our business to operate using, and people elect to use another excluding the rest of the group.

    Part of my job as a Professional Engineer is to ensure clear technical communication. In that way, I do have to pay attention to usage, and sometimes pronunciation does affect the interpretation of a technical term. Politely clarifying that type of thing is part of the day...but if I understood the concept clearly, even a polite correction is unnecessary, unwelcome and distracting.

    Shockingly, my attitude about language use is pretty quickly picked up on by coworkers. I am a favorite reviewer for a lot of engineers, both native english speakers and people for whom English is not a first (or second, or even third) language. Why? Because I'm not a pretentious twit who makes valueless "corrections" with the intent that everyone around me treat the English language like some sacred gift that requires worship. It's a tool. I use it, in a workmanlike way. Even MORE shockingly? People who really want to improve their language skills often approach me too and ASK for my input on pronunciation and usage. I'll freely offer assistance when asked, outside the technical review process.

    No, I definitely don't "hate" when people "bastardize" English. I really hate when conversations are interrupted or people are made uncomfortable by some self-appointed English-policeperson who can't stay on topic and needs to demonstrate linguistic superiority. I also "hate" when people assume that mispronunciation or inability to communicate a concept in English is a reflection on a person's intelligence or technical skill. Half my colleagues would be written off if PRONUNCIATION were some kind of fool-proof indicator of proficiency. Heck, not just colleagues...my University Faculty would be decimated if English pronunciation were a pre-requisite to employment.
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior


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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
    Shoot, I was a northerner who moved south.

    Lebanon
    North: Leb-a-NON
    South: Leb-nin

    Lafayette
    North: Lah-fay-YETTE
    South: Lah- FAY- it

    Shelbyville
    North: Shelby-ville
    South: SHEB-v'l (Can't even type that one! Maybe more like SHEB-vul)

    Santa Fe
    North: Santa - FAY
    South: Santa FEE

    Anyway, I could go on, but even here in 'Merica we all speak regionally. No biggy.
    I live in the South, and I certainly do not say any of those words that way, and I have NEVER heard any one say Santa Fe that way. And I've lived in the South all my life except for my time in California.



  10. #30
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    Another point, more relevant to this conversation, is that when pronouncing words from another language...honestly, there usually isn't a single "right way" on that either.

    I speak French, fluently, and about half my teachers were French Canadian, and the other half gained fluency in Europe. Sometimes France, but more often Belgium or Switzerland. They do not agree on pronunciation, inflection, or vocabulary. You're better off saying a French word the way you think it's supposed to sound. However you choose to pronounce it, you're immediately communicating that you're either not a native speaker, or that your French was learned in a particular region.

    What's really ludicrous is hearing someone who doesn't speak French at all try and correct someone else on THEIR pronunciation of a French word. So unless you're fluent in Italian, you probably shouldn't assume that you're getting Amerigo exactly right. It's a bit presumptuous to correct anyone on pronunciation of a language you don't actually speak.
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior


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  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParadoxFarm View Post
    Shoot, I was a northerner who moved south.

    Lebanon
    North: Leb-a-NON
    South: Leb-nin

    Lafayette
    North: Lah-fay-YETTE
    South: Lah- FAY- it

    Shelbyville
    North: Shelby-ville
    South: SHEB-v'l (Can't even type that one! Maybe more like SHEB-vul)

    Santa Fe
    North: Santa - FAY
    South: Santa FEE

    Anyway, I could go on, but even here in 'Merica we all speak regionally. No biggy.
    In Lebanon, OR, it's LEB-a-non.

    I couldn't believe that Versailles, KY is Ver-Sales. Not like the palace in France. But OK. It's Kentucky's town, so I'll call it what they want. When I'm in France (and being an American who wants to get along), I'll say Versailles their way.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by rugbygirl View Post
    No. "Hate?" No. It doesn't even bother me, honestly. I appreciate it when people make an effort to SPEAK English, my profession is extremely diverse, and it is not at all uncommon to have people attending meetings and have small groups reverting to their native tongues...leaving the rest of us wondering what they are talking about.

    THAT'S what I find rude, when we've agreed upon a language for our business to operate using, and people elect to use another excluding the rest of the group.

    Part of my job as a Professional Engineer is to ensure clear technical communication. In that way, I do have to pay attention to usage, and sometimes pronunciation does affect the interpretation of a technical term. Politely clarifying that type of thing is part of the day...but if I understood the concept clearly, even a polite correction is unnecessary, unwelcome and distracting.

    Shockingly, my attitude about language use is pretty quickly picked up on by coworkers. I am a favorite reviewer for a lot of engineers, both native english speakers and people for whom English is not a first (or second, or even third) language. Why? Because I'm not a pretentious twit who makes valueless "corrections" with the intent that everyone around me treat the English language like some sacred gift that requires worship. It's a tool. I use it, in a workmanlike way. Even MORE shockingly? People who really want to improve their language skills often approach me too and ASK for my input on pronunciation and usage. I'll freely offer assistance when asked, outside the technical review process.

    No, I definitely don't "hate" when people "bastardize" English. I really hate when conversations are interrupted or people are made uncomfortable by some self-appointed English-policeperson who can't stay on topic and needs to demonstrate linguistic superiority. I also "hate" when people assume that mispronunciation or inability to communicate a concept in English is a reflection on a person's intelligence or technical skill. Half my colleagues would be written off if PRONUNCIATION were some kind of fool-proof indicator of proficiency. Heck, not just colleagues...my University Faculty would be decimated if English pronunciation were a pre-requisite to employment.
    I'm with you. If you'll kindly re-read the rest of that post, you'll see that I did think that folks should tread lightly when giving unsolicited corrections.

    Being wrong in pronunciation doesn't justify digging in one's heels about the rudeness of someone else pointing out that one was wrong.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    Yabbut, wouldn't it bum you out if someone continually mispronounced your name and when given the correct pronunciation, got all up in your grill and instead "took ownership" of your name by insisting that they got to say it their way?
    No. People constantly misspell my name, and since most of the communication I have with them is written, it amounts to the same thing. It isn't even like I have some creatively spelled name -- it's as common and simple as you could ask for. I don't care. We both know who they are talking about, and it's not like a fairy dies every time the spelling is bungled or anything.

    And since I have been known to mispronounce my own name (it has a combination of sounds that, frankly, can be difficult for me to say some days), I don't particularly care how it gets pronounced, either. Although I think I'm the only one who ever struggles with it.



  14. #34
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    Jun. 20, 2008
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    You say tomaTOE, I say ToMAHTo...Almost every cooking show I've seen w/ English chefs say fresh HERbs in stead of fresh "erbs" or say Fil-let instead of Filay..now are the English known for their culinary skills - not so much but... .If it was the AmeREEgo rep who is mispronoucing it wrong then maybe I'd be a little concerned.. but if its a saddler who sells different brands then I wouldn't let it bother me at all. And really who cares how they say it as long as it's good quality,fits you, fits the horse and fits your budget.


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  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by saragethin View Post
    Being english im used too all the wrong pronunciation,watching tele is a daily screaming
    match .and the H in herb isnt silent ! It's HERB not erb .that is all
    I had a british pony club examiner tell me it is HERB not 'ERB because there's an fing H in it. To which I asked if the Thames ran through Worcestershire? Pronouncing them phonetically, of course!


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  16. #36
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Most certainly would not bunch my panties in the slightest to have a sales person not pronounce something how I assumed it was pronounced.


    Like so many have pointed out here, the right way to pronounce (or even spell) something can change from area to area. Who says the way I say it is pronounced is correct.

    I work in the plumbing industry. Half the people say pote-able the other half say pot-able. No idea which half is correct but we all seem to know what is being said.



  17. #37
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    OP, rather than correcting the salesperson, why not say "oh, it's <that pronounciation>? I thought it was <other pronounciation>." Presumably they know more about the brand than you do, so perhaps they can explain it, or they can say that both ways are acceptable, or whatever.
    Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
    Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
    VW sucks.



  18. #38
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    I used to work in a drs. office and was making an appointment for an Indian fellow... he asked me what my good name was.. I said H- A - R - E, like a rabbit, his response " you cannot pronounce H-a-r-e hare, it is HA-RAY" So there I was thousands of years of English, Scottish and Irish Hare ancestors only to find out we're really Har-rays LOL



  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by eqsiu View Post
    I had a british pony club examiner tell me it is HERB not 'ERB because there's an fing H in it. To which I asked if the Thames ran through Worcestershire? Pronouncing them phonetically, of course!
    I was inquiring about a study abroad, and expressed interest in "Lie-sester." Imagine my surprise when it's "Lester"! (Leicester) Those Brits love ignoring the middle of words!
    Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
    Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
    VW sucks.



  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by lrp1106 View Post
    I live in the South, and I certainly do not say any of those words that way, and I have NEVER heard any one say Santa Fe that way. And I've lived in the South all my life except for my time in California.
    Well, maybe it is just regional to middle Tennessee. I was just posting what was said when I lived up north, where I lived, as opposed to how they say it in my part of the south, right now. Trust me, I am not making this up. But I have to remind myself to try to use the local pronunciation.

    Oh, and Santa FEE, is the town in TN. That is how they pronounce Santa Fe, TN. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Fe,_Tennessee
    Last edited by ParadoxFarm; Apr. 24, 2013 at 01:40 PM. Reason: Add
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



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