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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2003
    Location
    Southern MD
    Posts
    1,448

    Default How to pass electric fencing underground to bypass a high traffic area?

    We have a paddock I'd like to reinforce with a strand of top board hot wire. BUT, there is a highly used gate between my box, and the rest of my electric fence and this paddock. In order to tie in, I need to bypass that gate.

    Is there a way to pass electric wire under ground and still keep the charge? I'm assuming there must be, but I'm not sure how to do it and I'm not having luck finding anything online. Help?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,195


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    106

    Default

    There is a PDF on how to install electrical fence and gates here.

    http://www.premier1supplies.com/

    I have bought stuff from these folks and find them first rate with products and service.
    Larry Garner
    Spalding Fly Predators



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,979

    Default

    In conduit of the PVC variety
    mykidshavefourlegs.blogspot.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,307

    Default

    Always use the underground insulated cable. (as Trubandloki linked) You're dealing with thousands of volts. Ordinary house wire is only rated to 600 volts. AND place the insulated wire in a plastic pipe or conduit. It will need replacing and it's a lot easier to pull a new wire through conduit than dig up the old wire.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,070

    Default

    Other option is to go overhead. My barn owner has done that for one paddock. Two long 2x4s screwed to the gate posts, some insulators, run the wire through the insulators and up the first 2x4, over the top of the gate, down the other 2x4 and back to fence. It is hight enough to get the tractor in the field. Between the 5 foot post & 8 foot 2x4 with overlap she probably has 12 foot of clearance give or take.

    This probably won't work it you have hay trucks or taller vehicles coming in and out of the gate. But seems easier than digging and running conduit for many situations.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,963

    Default

    Ours go overhead, with two plastic pipes on each side of the gate and the wire run up them on the outside, duct taped, across from one to the other and back down the other to the fence.

    Our gates are 16' wide and that has been up there, in our fierce winds, for decades and still holding fine.

    We drive pickups under them and have plenty of room to spare.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,201

    Default

    Use this: http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...-2-gauge-50-ft

    Run it through flexible plastic pipe or hose and seal the ends so water won't get into the pipe. Make the bend radius about a foot or so to permit easy pulling of the wire through it. When it needs to be replaced, it's easy to use the old wire to pull new into the pipe. Make sure it's buried deep enough so that traffic doesn't collapse the pipe.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,811

    Default

    Buy plastic conduit, and large radius turns from Lowes or Home Depot. It's cheap. Glue it together. Every underground wire I've buried for electric fence, that I didn't put in conduit, I've had to dig up, regardless of how much I paid for it, or how high quality it was supposed to be. Lightning will find a way to a rock or good ground, and blast a hole through the best wire insulation, and that's with multiple lightning arrestors of different types. A few bucks for conduit is some of the best money you can spend on an electric fence system. I've never had to replace one running through PVC conduit, and I put it in after I had to dig the wires up just so it would be easy to change the wire when needed.

    Under a gate, bury it deeper than you think you need to.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Tom, you give excellent advise. No disrespect but IMO and experience a lot of it is over “engineered”. I run a pretty big farm for a living, a lot of horses and hay. I would rather spend my time with the horses which is what I am paid well for. But not well enough to hire and or pay for maintenance and or upgrades. I hear what you are saying but I have not found going to that kind of time and expense justifies the exercise.
    I have use the following;
    http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...-2-gauge-50-ft
    I take a chain saw with a worn out chain and “cut” a 6”+ “grove” drop the wire, kick the dirt back in and foot tamp. Or take a spade shovel and make the grove. Staple the wire up the post and connect back to the hot wire with connectors that can be had at any electric fence supplier. Only takes a few minutes. It can be done the way Bluey explained but again IMO a lot more work.
    We get our fair share of heavy duty lighting storms. Last year a storm blew the crap out of a large Oak tree next to a paddock. The fence charger still worked. But it is well grounded.
    As always to each their own.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2001
    Location
    Nashville, TN USA
    Posts
    1,177

    Default

    I have many gates and my wire goes overhead-------easy and no prob



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,811

    Default

    We probably have different dirt. I've tried cutting this dirt with a chainsaw chain, and even the trenching chain that Bailey's used to sell. Either got about 4 inches. I've used several different kinds of underground wire, including Stafix, and it's all blown out. The PVC conduit costs a couple of bucks from Lowes.

    http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?...llow&cId=PDIO1



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