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  1. #1
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    Default My Rescued Hen - A Sad Update - last page

    OK, I admit I'm too lazy to resurrect my original thread.

    Suffice to say it's just a litle over a week now and "Penny" (I rechristened Quasi since she walks upright now) has laid 2 little pullet eggs for me.
    Go, Penny!!!

    Her weight has improved some but she is still not part of the HenHeathers Clique

    Poor little girl has a bald spot on her head and some marks on her comb where the B-word hens have gone at her.
    As she is still alive, and since the 5 of them spend the whole day in their fenced yard - around 20X40' - I guess that is a Good Thing.

    How much longer before they stop telling her those are the Wrong feathers and noone lays those little eggs & let her eat lunch at their table
    Last edited by 2DogsFarm; Apr. 24, 2013 at 06:48 PM.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  2. #2
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    Default

    No way to tell just how long. Hens who have been together for a while can be cliquish (or is that cluckish?) to a new hen coming in. sometimes getting another hen, yes getting more hens,can help the outsider be accepted. Or can give the outsider a friend to hang out with while the other hens ignore them.

    If you can get new hen to smell just like old hens, it might help. She might still have a smell from her previous home that makes your hens not want to be her friend.

    It's a lot like a new kid coming into a high school. Sometimes a kid is accepted, and sometimes it takes a while to make friends. You can help by maybe cleaning your hen and making her smell like the others.



  3. #3
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    Default

    MuaHaHaHa!!!
    Thanks, tw for enabling me to get a 6th hen

    Not a problem as I've had 7 in the coop before.
    I'll give them another week and see if that helps.
    Also - it is about the time of year when I deep-clean the coop. sweep out all the old shavings, put down Sevin and fresh shavings.
    Maybe that will help.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tidy wabbit View Post
    No way to tell just how long. Hens who have been together for a while can be cliquish (or is that cluckish?) to a new hen coming in. sometimes getting another hen, yes getting more hens,can help the outsider be accepted. Or can give the outsider a friend to hang out with while the other hens ignore them.

    If you can get new hen to smell just like old hens, it might help. She might still have a smell from her previous home that makes your hens not want to be her friend.

    It's a lot like a new kid coming into a high school. Sometimes a kid is accepted, and sometimes it takes a while to make friends. You can help by maybe cleaning your hen and making her smell like the others.
    How do you make a new hen smell like the others??? Eau de Hen perfume? Do you spray all of them so they smell alike? LOL. No really...is there something you do? Rub a rag over the old chickens them rub the new one with it?

    I find the chicken talk fascinating. I'll probably never live where I can have any, so I enjoy this vicariously...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Default

    You can wash the new hen off with some water. Sometimes you can smell something on a new chicken that your chickens don't like, but if you are caught by anyone sniffing hens, you might be committed. But sometimes they do carry the smell of their previous residence, and other chickens will react to it. And you can rub something that your hens like onto the new hen, like grass or hay or those great meal worms from mealwormsbythepound.com. No the hens won't eat the new girl, but she'll smell nice to them. Get the 11 pound shipment as the cost per pound is a lot less than getting less than 11 pounds.

    You can take feathers molted by the other hens or hay used in nests and rub on the new hen.

    Usually it is just a matter of time before all will get along. But it's always best to bring in 2 or more new chickens than just one. The pecking order isn't as bad with 2 hens to hang out together and avoid the mean girls who already live there. Fowl Psychology 101.

    Everyone should get some hens. And name them all. All my chickens always had names.



  6. #6
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    Default

    11# of mealworms
    I may look into that - those little suckers are some high protein treats.

    I got a small bag at TSC just to boost Penny's protein along with the others and they LOFF them.

    Yup - all hens have names: Noodle, Xtra-Crispy, Markena & Connie (the last 2 named for friends). Penny is actually named for another friend who wanted a hen named after her.
    The rooster & hens lost to the fox were Salad, Misty Cologne and Sgt. John.
    Misty was named by a friend - his drag name - and John was named for my friend Connie's husband since I got the chicks when I was visiting them.

    tw:
    If it ever warms up here, I may try washing new hen.
    Neighbors already think I'm a bit off, that could only assure them they're right
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Default

    If you have any of that mite dust for chickens, you might try using that. Dust them all, and maybe the dust will obscure any offensive smell on the new girl.

    I don't think extra crispy is a good name for a chicken, LOL.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Jun. 21, 2004
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    Central Florida
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jetsmom View Post
    I find the chicken talk fascinating. I'll probably never live where I can have any, so I enjoy this vicariously...
    I have to agree 110%!!! I LOVE the chookie stories
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  9. #9
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    It's not just a bunch of old barn biddies clucking!

    Chickens have personalities and hens are especially cool. Of course, it's still disconcerting that chickens are supposed to be smarter than horses. Remember the old disputes between Ed McMann and Johnny Carson about which was more intelligent, the chicken or the horse?

    ETA The freeze dried meal worms from mealwormsbythepound.com are the same good quality as the ones that you buy from TSC (brand: Mealworm Frenzy). If you buy 11 pounds (a little under 10$ a pound) and put then in a garbage can and put the lid on, they stay good in humidity and heat and everything. And the hens will go stand and wait for you to open it up and hand them their mealworms.



  10. #10
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    Default

    I love these chicken stories, too. Some day I'd like to live in a place where I can have chickies. The condo HOA would frown on them, though.

    Chickens can smell stuff? Really? Owls don't. That's why Great Horned Owls will take skunks. My vet is a falconer, used to hunt with a Great Horned Owl, but the danged thing kept bringing him skunks...



  11. #11
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    Some birds, such as buzzards, have a keen sense of smell. Owls cannot smell? Are you sure? Raptors can smell. Ask the bald eagle who comes to the road in front of our barn every time something gets run over on the road. Some birds have a better sense of smell than other birds do.



  12. #12
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    To the OP, I think you should get 1-2 more hens and that would help with intergation. By the way I am one of those people that always gets 2 puppies or kittens because I really do believe it is easier.(disclaimer notice)


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  13. #13
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    Default

    Another good idea from tw
    I usually just dust the coop floor with Sevin and sprinkle some outside in their dusting places.
    The hens get some on themselves when they dust-bathe.

    Since Penny isn't going in the yard a lot, I may have to dust her separately and see if that works.
    I'll be doing the coop Spring Cleanup this weekend & will let you know how it goes.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  14. #14
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    Default

    Don't put too much sevin on them. I hope it works. They have some "watered down" diluted mite dust for chickens, so you might try that on everyone.



  15. #15
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    Default She's gone

    Came home today to find Penny unable to stand.
    I am afraid she may be a rare case of Marek's in a young bird.

    I have put her down - a sad story for another time - and deep-cleaned the part of the coop she had been confined to w/a bleach solution.

    Since she will have been resident here 2 weeks, I am hoping the rest of my hens (who were vaccinated as chicks) will not get sick.

    Chicken people, please jingle for my flock
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  16. #16
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
    Came home today to find Penny unable to stand.
    I am afraid she may be a rare case of Marek's in a young bird.

    I have put her down - a sad story for another time - and deep-cleaned the part of the coop she had been confined to w/a bleach solution.

    Since she will have been resident here 2 weeks, I am hoping the rest of my hens (who were vaccinated as chicks) will not get sick.

    Chicken people, please jingle for my flock
    So sorry for your loss. There are a number of different strains of Marek's, some of which affect older birds. I'm not sure if the Marek's vaccine protects against all of them. You might want to contact your hatchery & ask (not that there's really anything you can do anyway except for good husbandry).

    But jingling away heavily for you & your flock!!!



  17. #17
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    Thanks, Bacardi1

    I got my hens as 9wk pullets 4 years ago.
    The girl who sold them to me told me she always ordered vaccinated chicks.
    So I have to assume these got the protection as day-olds.

    So I can only hope if it was Marek's, my hens will not be affected.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  18. #18
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    <jingles>
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  19. #19
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    I am so sorry for your loss and am jingling for the rest of your flock!!!



  20. #20
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    Sorry for your loss and jingles for your flock.



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