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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,344

    Default Gardeners- What do I do with my daffodils?

    I wonder this every year, and never really follow through. The front of my house has a HUGE bunch of daffodils that are so pretty when they are blooming (that wasn't at their peek....they got even prettier shortly after that). But now that they are all done and spent, they're just kinda sad. i would really like to plant some perennials this year, but I don't know what to do with the daffodils. Do I chop them off? I've heard of tying them up when they are done...is that what I do? I have no clue. I'm not a terribly educated or good gardener...I typically throw things in the ground or in a pot that I like, and try to be sure I water enough (amazingly, the couple of "gardens" I've had have looked quite nice). I've never had SO many daffodils nor have had them so densely populating one area. Help!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2010
    Location
    Texarkana, AR
    Posts
    1,701

    Default

    When the foliage starts to yellow and die down you can mow it off and just leave them where they are or you can dig up the bulbs, store them in a dry cool place and replant them this fall.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2011
    Location
    Dutchess county, NY
    Posts
    937

    Default

    When the blooms are spent, cut off the stalk that bloomed ( this is called dead heading). Let the leaves be until they start to wilt in the fall then clip them off near the ground.

    It's good to plant daffodils and day Lilly's together - then you'll have blooms all spring and summer


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Posts
    3,386

    Default

    Bulbs need their leaves left to store food for their next bloom so don't cut until they wilt.

    Agree intermix plantings with something taller that blooms later.
    Hostas if the area turns shady, suggested day lilies if bright.
    About the only time losing is more fun than winning is when you're fighting temptation.
    -- Tom Wilson, actor & comedian



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pony grandma View Post
    Bulbs need their leaves left to store food for their next bloom so don't cut until they wilt.
    This. No leaf "braiding", no "pruning", no nothing until the foliage starts seriously yellowing & dying back of its own accord. Also, do NOT "dig them up & store them for replanting in the fall". That's only a last resort when someone is moving & wants to take the bulbs with them. Digging up & replanting every year seriously depletes the bulb's energy, & daffodils that may have literally survived forever, most likely will only survive this treatment for a few years at best. If you have large clumps (daffodil bulbs WILL multiply) that you notice aren't blooming as profusely as they once did, you can rejuvenate the bed by carefully digging up the clumps, dividing up the bulbs, & replanting them with some space between them. In fact, I have a bed of "Mt. Hood" & "Salome" daffodils that I have to divide up in a couple of weeks. Not exactly a project I'm looking forward to, but necessary if I want the thick clusters of blooms I used to get from them.

    As far as planting perennials, if you buy small plants & are careful planting them, it should be fairly easy to squeeze them in around your daffodils. Try to select those that put on their growth & bloom after the daffodils have waned to avoid competition.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    33,608

    Default

    yep, let them go until they start to wilt, so they can restore strength for next spring. It's about 8 weeks. That gives you something green to look at until the other stuff comes in.

    Throw some bulb fertilizer on it, too! can't hurt.

    Other than that, stagger the summer perennials around them, etc, make sure you mark where the daffodils are though, so you don't inadvertently dig into them when you plant.

    I envy your lush blooms. I used to have the most kick but daffodils at my old house, the earliest blooming at the end of January, then giving me oodles of cut flowers, enough to have bouquets indoors....now, this year I had one crippled bloom, aside from the handful of Grape Hyacinths...

    When the leaves are wilting you can dig them up and divide (they might be really deep though, and you probably get clusters and clusters. Small bulbs will likely not bloom for the next couple of years, but eventually they will catch up)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,637

    Default

    I leave my bulb flowers alone, clear out any dead stalks or leaves, and then let them come back each spring--seems to work with the tulips, narcissus, and the day lilies (some I planted, some from the previous owner.)

    Now if only roses and perennial fruit bushes were as cooperative....



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,064

    Default

    Agree that you leave them until they dry up and die back. You can dig them up and divide them any time after they've bloomed. I always divide mine in the spring. I give many away, and started planting others all down my driveway. In 20 years of doing this, I have about 400 feet of blooming daffodils in the spring.
    It's 2014. Do you know where your old horse is?



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2006
    Location
    Spooner, WI
    Posts
    2,389

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pony4me View Post
    Agree that you leave them until they dry up and die back. You can dig them up and divide them any time after they've bloomed. I always divide mine in the spring. I give many away, and started planting others all down my driveway. In 20 years of doing this, I have about 400 feet of blooming daffodils in the spring.
    You win the internets.

    I've just started my daffodil phase. I planted them in a woodsy area beneath the deck and the pond. I won't live long enough to do what you've done.



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