The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,277

    Default Interesting gun data

    This article showed up on my FB page. I'm one who feels my home would be safer with a gun in it. White. Female. Republican. Conservative. Christian.

    http://newsbusters.org/blogs/matt-ve...women-feel-gun
    Ride like you mean it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,587

    Default

    Maybe more women than the left realizes are aware that 911 and pepper spray (if it's legal*) aren't really going to level the playing field when they're assaulted.

    (*In MA you needed the lowest level firearms ID to even buy pepper spray and permit aps can all be denied for no particular reason by the local police. And we all know how MA's multi-step, extremely strict gun laws work great and make it so criminals can never get firearms, which is why there's no gun crimes ever in Boston.)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2006
    Posts
    449

    Default

    Ok, I read the article, and I see that it's a conservative piece and the headline indicates that this poll is something that the left doesn't want to acknowledge. But then when I read it, the takeaway message I get is that women FEEL safer with a gun in the home. When you look at the statistics, the reality is that they are actually more likely to be killed by their husband/bf if a gun is available. As per the article:

    Forty percent of women who are murdered in the US are killed by intimate partners. Guns are the cause of more than two-thirds of those domestic violence homicides, killing more victims than all other weapons combined. When an abuser has access to firearms, his victim is eight times more likely to be killed by him. The simple presence of a gun in the home makes any woman 2.7 times more likely to be murdered. And an abuse victim having access to a gun does not make her any less to be killed by her partner.

    I did look up the statistics on http://www.dvrc-or.org, and the 40% is high, it's only 30% of female murders are intimate partner related. The only thing the poll indicates is that people feel safer and think they are able to defend themselves better if they have a gun in the home. But the bottom line, thinking and feeling safer does not actually mean being safer.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,277

    Default

    Good points, CG34. And thanks for the extra research. Polls are have become biased...no longer objective surveys to test the waters but rather, contrived questions to elicit answer that will prove a particular point.

    If I lived alone, I would certainly have a gun.
    Ride like you mean it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,886

    Default

    Guns and suicide - NE Journal of Medicine

    The empirical evidence linking suicide risk in the United States to the presence of firearms in the home is compelling.3 There are at least a dozen U.S. case–control studies in the peer-reviewed literature, all of which have found that a gun in the home is associated with an increased risk of suicide. The increase in risk is large, typically 2 to 10 times that in homes without guns, depending on the sample population (e.g., adolescents vs. older adults) and on the way in which the firearms were stored. The association between guns in the home and the risk of suicide is due entirely to a large increase in the risk of suicide by firearm that is not counterbalanced by a reduced risk of nonfirearm suicide. Moreover, the increased risk of suicide is not explained by increased psychopathologic characteristics, suicidal ideation, or suicide attempts among members of gun-owning households.


    Three additional findings from the case–control studies are worth noting. The higher risk of suicide in homes with firearms applies not only to the gun owner but also to the gun owner's spouse and children. The presence of a gun in the home, no matter how the gun is stored, is a risk factor for completed suicide. And there is a hierarchy of suicide risk consistent with a dose–response relationship. How household guns are stored matters especially for young people — for example, one study found that adolescent suicide was four times as likely in homes with a loaded, unlocked firearm as in homes where guns were stored unloaded and locked.
    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp0805923


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,277

    Default

    I wonder if that rate is higher because a gunshot is so final. Many times suicide attempts are done with pills. There's a lag time there where the victim can be discovered and rescued.

    They definitely kill!
    Ride like you mean it.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,886

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ezduzit View Post
    I wonder if that rate is higher because a gunshot is so final. Many times suicide attempts are done with pills. There's a lag time there where the victim can be discovered and rescued.

    They definitely kill!
    Exactly .. as I quoted above

    The presence of a gun in the home, no matter how the gun is stored, is a risk factor for completed suicide.
    (emphasis added)

    I knew a sweet, intelligent, sensitive 22 yo who would likely be alive 15 years later were it not for the gun her boyfriend had.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,643

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RainyDayRide View Post
    I knew a sweet, intelligent, sensitive 22 yo who would likely be alive 15 years later were it not for the gun her boyfriend had.
    Sounds like you are assuming without a gun she would still be alive. Without a gun, she may have tried some other method of suicide. And most who make attempts are eventually successful (or so I have been told, I have not looked for stats to back this up).
    Last edited by Where'sMyWhite; Apr. 22, 2013 at 03:24 PM.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,886

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Where'sMyWhite View Post
    Sounds like you are assuming without a gun she would still be alive. Without a gun, she may have tried some other method of suicide. And most who make attempts are successful (or so I have been told, I have not looked for stats to back this up).
    That is why I said that it was "likely" that she would still be alive ...

    and no, it is not true that most who make an attempt are successful.

    According to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health3, in the US there were 8.3m adults who had serious thoughts of committing suicide, and 2.3m who had actually made plans to commit to suicide. Of those, 1.1m actually attempted suicide, but only just over 33,000 succeeded. Which would make the ratio of failure to success 33 to 1.
    15% of those who attempt suicide will try again within a year - that means that 85% will not... the rate of "success" depends upon the method chosen the first and subsequent times.
    http://web4health.info/en/answers/bi...ide-repeat.htm


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,390

    Default

    The end results of all these studies seem to prove the weapon isn't the cause of these deaths... It's mental illness. No doubt suicide is mental illness, Mass killing, again a mental illness AND just plain criminal behavior.

    So why isn't the hue and cry for improved mental intervention? Instead of more restrictions on the normal mentally balanced segment of the population...


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,643

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hosspuller View Post
    So why isn't the hue and cry for improved mental intervention? Instead of more restrictions on the normal mentally balanced segment of the population...
    Good question for sure (at least IMO). But I also struggle with your right to privacy and how do you know who really is a danger to themselves or others? Mental illness is such a challenge...

    And I also believe the problem is not with the firearm but rather who uses it... one could argue that anyone who uses a firearm to kill, other than self defense, may be mentally ill.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2004
    Posts
    6,978

    Default

    Women typically do not use firearms to commit suicide, they use drugs as the method of choice.

    One interesting thought about "guns in the home and family shootings"...bad guys, druggies, criminals, rapists, robbers also have families. Gang members also have families. These wonderful people are listed in with normal good people.
    "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"


    6 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Cellphone Data?
    By Tiffany01 in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Apr. 1, 2013, 01:31 AM
  2. Breeders - what do you DO with the data from your website?
    By TrueColours in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Apr. 6, 2012, 10:48 AM
  3. Data from WEG
    By andy.smaga in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 79
    Last Post: Oct. 17, 2010, 03:08 AM
  4. Survey for my Gr.12 Data Class!
    By KendraVDK in forum Off Course
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Oct. 14, 2010, 02:36 PM
  5. DNA data question
    By Simrat in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Aug. 21, 2008, 10:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •