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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    12,263

    Default Does anyone know where to find guideline for the amount of force a horse's foot takes

    I was telling a friend that horse's legs get a harder workout than dog's do in terms of stress they are under, but am having a hard time explaining it. I know I've seen links that show what amount of pounds per square inch, a hoof is taking upon landing from a jump, or at a gallop, but can't find it... Basically he thinks dogs work harder/cause more wear on their bones/joints and I think horses do.

    Does anyone know of any links offhand that show what I am talking about?.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    1,268

    Default

    It's going to totally depend on the action or gait- and the footing- calculating the force of impact is really subjective- it's not just an equation. Also the individual horse's conformation is going to play a big part in how various forces are distributed.

    I don't understand why you would even want to make this argument because dog's feet are designed to absorb the forces of what dogs do- and horses feet do what horses do. A horse with never have to jump a fence and land on paws.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,275

    Default

    Impossible to make an argument either way just based on the info you're looking for.
    Given enough specifics, sure, you could state a typical PSI range exerted upon the hoof or paw upon ground impact. You'd have to specify the working conditions, the breed or or at least type of horse and dog (like, compare a light saddle horse with avg weight of 1100lb, vs. herding dog w/ avg weight 45lb, both moving at a trot on packed hard dirt surface), etc. AND, even once you get at a number, it's not the same thing as saying how much stress or wear this creates in their joints and bones. For example the horse may experience much higher PSI but his bones are bigger, tendons thicker, etc. So the PSI number tells us almost nothing about whether the body structure is experiencing more or less "stress"?

    Lets say you have a big 50hp tractor and a little 25hp utility tractor. Both are out there working all day scooping up a pile of dirt. Each scoop taken by the big tractor is much, much heavier than the little tractor. That doesn't mean it's under more "stress" or causing greater wear and tear-- both machines were designed with structures to handle the rated loads. The excess wear and tear and breakdowns happen when you exceed those rated loads, or don't maintain the equipment.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2009
    Posts
    134

    Default

    If you put "equine ground reaction force" into google scholar you will find what you're looking for.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    12,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Baby View Post
    If you put "equine ground reaction force" into google scholar you will find what you're looking for.
    Thanks!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Baby View Post
    If you put "equine ground reaction force" into google scholar you will find what you're looking for.
    Thanks!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 1999
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    14,656

    Default

    Get the Nova episode on thoroughbreds "A Magic Way of Going".


    "If you would have only one day to live, you should spend at least half of it in the saddle."


    1 members found this post helpful.

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