The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 6 of 19 FirstFirst ... 4567816 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 376
  1. #101
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2009
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    Police thyself, Pilgrim, and you'll have little to worry about from da freaks!
    Oh, if only that were true, Lady Eboshi.

    We self-police 6 ways from Sunday -- even got best practices written into NYC LAW -- and we do not enjoy a moment's peace from the RARAs.
    Last edited by michaleenflynn; Apr. 22, 2013 at 08:45 PM.
    VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts


    7 members found this post helpful.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    I'm not a PETA fan (at all), and I have no idea what a rara is, but the web link looks pretty similar to what I was taught in Pony Club some 30 years ago. I've never used large tanks, but I do scrub buckets and waterers daily; stalls are cleaned thoroughly and then picked as needed throughout the day; and manure has never been kept near the barn (whether my own, or one I've boarded at). The horses get approximately 3 flakes, 3x daily of high quality hay (plus grains as needed per horse) . . . though I cannot imagine giving any of my guys that much straight alfalfa. And they live outside in the evenings on properly-tended pastures with shelters and waterers. Other than being very general, the only thing I see that's really wrong is they make it out as a one size fits all list, when we know horses don't really work that way


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    'Looks pretty similar' really isn't.

    Like a cubic zirconia is only a diamond wanna be.

    'Kept near the barn' is not equal to 'can't be seen by (horses) or from the stables'

    Do the water tanks have rocks or logs? remember, they should.

    'Regardless of the hay's quality, it should be stored away from the horse's stall to avoid respiratory problems caused by its dust. A dietary supplement of grains, oats, or sweet feed should be given twice each day, ideally at the same time every day'

    How far is away from?
    In another building?
    Same building but xxx feet away?
    Is a loft OK?
    If dusty hay is bad (yes, it is so listed) why would you be storing dusty hay?
    And yet there is no mention of dusty sawdust?

    And what about the many horses who do not need grain, or react badly to it?

    Surely you don't 'count 5 droppings and no more'; nor does Pony Club believe an immaculate stall is a sign of coprophagy.
    -Oh, what about that stage in young foals where they pick up fresh manure from their dams to get their gut flora going?

    Similar, but not the same. Tremendous value in one; little of value in the other.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    And if one reads closely, the Ten Commandments in the bible were not called that by 'the giver of them', but were called that after the fact by those who received them.

    If OP wants to call the 'shoulds' on the PETA site their commandments, she is not wrong to do that.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Sep. 18, 2007
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    662

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gaitedincali View Post
    My horses would think they'd died and gone to heaven if they got a half bale of hay a day.

    Plus the "dietary supplement of grains, oats, or sweet feed" that I'm supposed to be giving them.

    How many days do you figure before I foundered the pony-sized lightly-worked horses with 50# of alfalfa a day plus sweet feed?
    huh?? obviously their message is simplistic...there are so many variables...like size of bale!

    but 50# is 2% of 2500lbs... so the math part should clarify the generalization.

    Your maybe 750 lb horse would be eating 15lbs of combined hay and grain which is less than 1/2 bale of small bale very dry orchard grass not counting any grain..



  6. #106
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,227

    Default

    Wow, it's like watching terriers fight over a rat of who hates "them" the most. Frothing arguments against a group known for their frothing arguments -- who needs to pay for cable when there is COTH!


    6 members found this post helpful.

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
    Posts
    4,142

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    'Looks pretty similar' really isn't.

    Like a cubic zirconia is only a diamond wanna be.

    'Kept near the barn' is not equal to 'can't be seen by (horses) or from the stables'

    Do the water tanks have rocks or logs? remember, they should.

    'Regardless of the hay's quality, it should be stored away from the horse's stall to avoid respiratory problems caused by its dust. A dietary supplement of grains, oats, or sweet feed should be given twice each day, ideally at the same time every day'

    How far is away from?
    In another building?
    Same building but xxx feet away?
    Is a loft OK?
    If dusty hay is bad (yes, it is so listed) why would you be storing dusty hay?
    And yet there is no mention of dusty sawdust?

    And what about the many horses who do not need grain, or react badly to it?

    Surely you don't 'count 5 droppings and no more'; nor does Pony Club believe an immaculate stall is a sign of coprophagy.
    -Oh, what about that stage in young foals where they pick up fresh manure from their dams to get their gut flora going?

    Similar, but not the same. Tremendous value in one; little of value in the other.
    Folks, I don't thing anyone was intending this thing to be "comprehensive." Any more than a 6th-grade "hygiene" book covers every possible, er, "circumstance."
    There are whole BOOKS on horse care, even cavalry manuals once thought to be the gold standard by entire ARMIES, the practices of which might be questionable under various conditions; the traditional farrier practice of every horse's hoof being cut to a 45 degree angle comes to mind. If I rummaged around on my bookshelf of quite famous and distinguished authorities, I bet I could post up some looeys!

    I DO realize you NYC carriage folks are under a special scrutiny and dealing with major-league wackers; hats off to you for the terrific job you do with your horses! Anyone who actually KNOWS anything knows the TRUTH.

    BTW, logs in water tanks are key. I was doing that eons before PETA ever thought of it, 'cause I got mighty sick of throwing out 100 gallons or more of water every time a squirrel decided to go for a dunk. And I always know if the tank is getting low, because the horses play like to bang the logs around like someone hitting their glass with a spoon . . .


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2011
    Location
    Southern WI
    Posts
    311

    Default

    I'm just thinking of all the infractions I have committed.

    Yikes, my horses are starving because they don't get enough hay. Oops, my manure pile can be seen - my ponies are emotionally scarred! Oh noes, my horse pooped more than five times, he is living in filth! I didn't scrub the water buckets today, the water is undrinkable!

    You see, I prefer to think that the article was written as a general guideline. But, knowing something about PETA's history, I don't think they have any grey area. Kind of frightening, if you ask me.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    BTW, logs in water tanks are key. I was doing that eons before PETA ever thought of it, 'cause I got mighty sick of throwing out 100 gallons or more of water every time a squirrel decided to go for a dunk. And I always know if the tank is getting low, because the horses play like to bang the logs around like someone hitting their glass with a spoon . . .
    I float pine planks in mine and have for over a decade; I think it is a good idea but it does provide another place for slime and algae to grow. Your horses haven't mastered the bite-and-fling so you have to hunt for the wood toy in the unlikeliest of spots, yet? They will!

    And there are those who put their dirty little hooves into the larger tanks and splash; or the truly creative who climb in and lie down...


    Saying something is a good idea and has worked for you is different than saying it should be an industry standard or else one is neglectful.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,611

    Default

    We have these bird ladders in all our water troughs:

    http://rmbo.org/v3/Portals/0/Documen...r%20Design.pdf

    A friend makes them and came one day and put them all in.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,432

    Default

    But one more question: What do rocks do?

    But in any case, if you are on the fence about the purpose of the page, read the bird care sheet....if the first couple paragraphs don't make you feel like complete heel for owning - pardon me, I meant guarding over - birds....you are beyond redemption!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    2,890

    Default

    Yeah, about that feeding at the same time thing...not me. I have found through trial and error, that if I feed when I get to the barn (in other words, after I wakey-wakey, have my coffee and do this, that and the other) at different times, I don't have horses who bang on the barn (actually pasture now) or paw or try to duke it out with each other. They know to be patient and their feed will show up, just hang in there, no point in acting stoopid. When I used to have a set feeding time (like when showing or when I worked outside my home, etc.), that's when my horses acted worse. The only thing so far, is when 5 PM comes around, they come up from the pasture and stand by the gate and LOOOOOK at the house.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


    6 members found this post helpful.

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,227

    Default

    "(Immaculate stalls can mean that horses are eating their own feces in order to supplement their diet.)"

    What? I guess maybe if they are on stall mats, but I've never found an immaculate stall to be because the horse is eating their own poo. Otherwise, rescue sites would look...much different.

    "The manure pile, where droppings are temporarily disposed of, should not be able to be seen or smelled from the horse's stall or shelter and should be cleared from the property at least once every month. The pasture should be free of debris. Fences should be checked regularly for stability and strength."

    Smelled? First of all, horse manure doesn't smell. The biggest issue (of course, as we all know) is fly control. Composted properly, it doesn't smell, flies are controlled and no, I'm not removing it once a month. That sh*t is literally gold!

    "Yellow, dusty, moldy, smelly hay or hay with fine dust, flakes, or clumps of plant matter may cause colic, respiratory problems, or even starvation, should the horse refuse to eat it. Regardless of the hay's quality, it should be stored away from the horse's stall to avoid respiratory problems caused by its dust. A dietary supplement of grains, oats, or sweet feed should be given twice each day, ideally at the same time every day."

    If you have an average horse, in certain parts of the country, these guidelines might be fine. But overfeeding (as would be the case for my fat man and the pony) following these guidelines would be just as bad as underfeeding (as would be the case for the mare).

    All of this has been discussed ad nauseum here, but my real issue with it is that horse care can and does vary. My horses are out 24/7, except the guy who is here on stall rest. They have a sacrifice pasture when it's wet. Much of my pasture is actually wooded, which means that there are lots of obstacles. Interestingly, I've had only one injury in the years I've had horses on this property, and it was a youngster with a puncture wound. I've seen way worse on pristine pasture-land (and I'm really not sure why, other than the conjecture that horses get STUPID in wide-open areas, and tend to be more careful in the woods). Of course, now that I've said that, they are all going to injure themselves, which I will promptly blame on this thread. My BIGGEST issue with it is that the do-gooders who read that will misinterpret things and start calling things in or judging others needlessly. I had one person ask me if it was okay if a horse had a small pasture area, and not a huge amount of grass to eat and no blanket while woefully proclaiming abuse. I asked for pictures, took a look, and the very fat horse was quite happy to wallow away in his dirt lot with his hay.

    Sometimes I think just a little bit of education is dangerous. Far better to have questions and answers related to the CONDITION of a horse. That's way more important than a half bale guideline.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2003
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    6,177

    Default

    I was disappointed to see PETA perpetuate the old practice of "cyclical worming" whether you need it or not. Isn't that what caused and is continuing to cause resistance to virtually all available wormers? Most vets in my area have now moved to doing fecal tests and only treating as necessary.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller


    7 members found this post helpful.

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,611

    Default

    PETA:

    ---April 17, 2013
    Totilas Abuse Charges Dropped
    By: Bernadette Palmeri
    PRINT SHARE
    On April 15, the Frankfurt, Germany, state attorney dropped all charges in the Totilas abuse case. The charges were originally filed last October by the German branch of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

    The charges were targeted at the horse’s owners, Ann Kathrin Linsenhoff and Paul Schockemöhle, trainer Klaus-Martin Rath and rider Matthias Rath. PETA had alleged that Totilas, a 13-year-old Dutch Warmblood stallion (Gribaldi—Lominka, Glendale) ridden to 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games (Ky.) team, individual and freestyle gold with Edward Gal before being sold to Schockemöhle and Linsenhoff, was abused since he was kept in isolation from other horses and submitted to rollkur during training. A group of six experts and animal welfare officer Dr. Madeleine Martin visited Totilas’ farm last December, seeking evidence of abuse.

    In response to the charges being dropped, Klaus-Martin told Dressursport Deutschland: "The animal welfare officer quickly saw that neither the images nor the videos of any evidence came from here. And the criticism of the training, it is indeed more of a religious war. This debate being waged is not factual. But now we have the law on our side, and stating that this is absolutely not a case of cruelty to animals may be important for the entire equestrian sport."---


    6 members found this post helpful.

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    My pony stands on his manure pile, like he's king of the hill . In my defense, it's turned regularly and really compost, but......


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    Ages ago in the 80's I remember one boarding barn where a very old packed manure pile was the favorite lying down resting place for the older horses with arthritis since it 'heated up' like a spa on chilly autumn nights.
    And they had to go a ways to get to it, too, it was quite a distance from the stables where they were fed.

    Oh, the horror!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2007
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    From the PETA site Companion Animals
    http://www.peta.org/living/companion...ompanions.aspx

    "...with everything you need to know about being a great guardian to your furry, feathered, and finned friends. From housetraining Fido to nontoxic flea control, from spaying and neutering to saving kitty's claws and your couch, you’ve found your reliable source for animal-care advice."

    So, yes, I think they DO consider themselves to be the Gold Standard and Answer to All Questions.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,432

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    From the PETA site Companion Animals
    http://www.peta.org/living/companion...ompanions.aspx

    "...with everything you need to know about being a great guardian to your furry, feathered, and finned friends. From housetraining Fido to nontoxic flea control, from spaying and neutering to saving kitty's claws and your couch, you’ve found your reliable source for animal-care advice."

    So, yes, I think they DO consider themselves to be the Gold Standard and Answer to All Questions.
    aren't we blessed to have them! <vomit icon>

    And no, I own my critters. I am not a pet parent.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
    Posts
    4,114

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    And no, I own my critters. I am not a pet parent.
    I thought THEY owned US? I mean, I had a nasty headache today and none of my critters brought me anything to eat or took care of me (I am sure that Lord Meow, the barn cat, would have brought me a mouse if I would let him inside - he hasn't gotten on the vegetarian cat bandwagon yet). In fact, I had to get up and feed THEM even though I felt like garbage. The only thing they did was pile on the sofa with me and tell me how I was being a good cat. (That was right before they demanded dinner). Who owns who?
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com


    4 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 115
    Last Post: Oct. 26, 2012, 01:56 AM
  2. Allowing partial self-care board at full-care facility
    By Watermark Farm in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Nov. 16, 2011, 06:39 PM
  3. COTH Ten Commandments
    By SmartAlex in forum Off Course
    Replies: 167
    Last Post: Nov. 12, 2011, 01:10 AM
  4. Highveld Horse Care - South Africa, tragic horse stories
    By Old Mac Donald in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Apr. 14, 2010, 09:06 AM
  5. PETA's Stance on horseback riding?
    By Shodan VIII in forum Off Course
    Replies: 120
    Last Post: Sep. 18, 2006, 02:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •