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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
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    446

    Default How to price saddle for sale?

    Does anyone have a specific measure for setting a price for saddle resale. I have one I am debating selling bc I am currently horseless, and am not sure it makes sense have it sit around and just hope it works for whatever I lease/buy next... Saddle is only a year old and in pristine condition (cleaned daily, kept covered, no major wear) do you all generally use a percentage off new value? I haven't seen many of this model for sale used, though I know several people who have them, which is making it a bit tricky for me to set a price... Also, i'd guess that the current popularity of the saddle would have something to do with how it should be priced... any thoughts?



  2. #2
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    Aug. 2, 2001
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    Ft Worth, TX, USA
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    Default

    Google your saddle brand, and model and see if you can find any similar for sale. Or, look at known websites selling used saddles to find comparisons. If you find any that are with a tack shop, back out (usually) 20 % that would be their consignment fee.
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  3. #3
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    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Columbus, OH
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    Default

    To do it right, pull comps on very similar saddles. The trick, of course, is to know what constitutes a "very similar saddle" and to look at sale prices, not listing prices.

    Shoot me a PM if you'd like me to give it a stab. Brand, model, seat size, tree size, leather color, and any custom options are useful to know.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2004
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    Sandgate, VT
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    In addition to the good advice you've already gotten, you also need to take into consideration the new retail price, seat size and tree width when pricing a saddle. If the new saddle price has just been raised considerably, you can probably price it a bit higher than if the price has stayed the same. (NOTE: always price the saddle so you have some room to negotiate.) However, if your saddle is an unusual seat size and / or tree width - say a 16.5" medium, or a 17.5" narrow or a 16.5" xxw - it will probably be a harder sell, and you may have to drop the price accordingly.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2007
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    Tampa FL
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    Default

    Post pictures and complete description, many people here can help with that!



  6. #6
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    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by MILOUTE55 View Post
    Post pictures and complete description, many people here can help with that!
    She can't. That would be a violation of the forums' advertising policies.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2007
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    Tampa FL
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    She can't. That would be a violation of the forums' advertising policies.
    Oops you're right Jenny



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2001
    Posts
    2,545

    Default

    I take retail, cut it in half, then add/subtract based on age, condition and desirability. If I had a saddle currently selling for $2,000 in perfect condition that people wanted, I'd probably ask $1,700 but take offers. Of course, I'd look at the market and compare what other saddles are going for.
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,467

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    A) If the saddle fits you well and you bought new, I wouldn't sell it. Rather, I'd start your own Saddle Library. It's awesome to have saddles for every occasion (shape of horse/discipline) that is always right for you.

    B) Otherwise for a saddle like yours-- a new model, not more than broken in-- maybe start at 80% of current retail. Sadly, the saddle world has become like the computer/car worlds. Manufacturers want us to buy into planned obsolescence and you lose money driving the saddle off the lot. For older (but not trashed) used saddles, the benchmark is 60% of the new price. You go up or down depending on the standard or unusual sizing, as Kitt says. You can kinda/sorta go up with a high-end brand. But the folks spending $5K on a new saddle are still losing almost the same percentage as someone who bought a $2.5K saddle. (The actual number of dollars lost argues against buying the more expensive saddle). Below, say, the $2K mark, I think people lose more while marketing that used saddle, even in fine condition.

    All this assumes you are selling this saddle yourself, not giving someone that 20-25% commission.

    I hope this helps you come up with a price.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
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    Boston Area
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    A) If the saddle fits you well and you bought new, I wouldn't sell it. Rather, I'd start your own Saddle Library. It's awesome to have saddles for every occasion (shape of horse/discipline) that is always right for you.
    Now I know what to call my tackroom full of saddles! A library. I like that.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    I usually knock off 20% or 30% as soon as it leaves the rack.

    I sold one last year that I used for 1 year. Bought it for $1250 and sold it for $900.

    Often, it's worth just keeping them unless you think you will never use it again..
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2000
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    I am still kicking myself for all the saddles I bought and sold when I was younger. I'm older and wiser now and will keep mostly anything I buy unless I have an extreme reason to sell it.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
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    Default

    What about a cc saddle in like new condition, but it's black not brown? Does it affect the value that much considering people prefer brown over black?



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karosel View Post
    What about a cc saddle in like new condition, but it's black not brown? Does it affect the value that much considering people prefer brown over black?
    It depends on the saddle, but generally yes, a black close contact saddle is a tougher resell and commands a lower price than an equivalent brown saddle. Because of disciplinary aesthetic preferences, most notably in the hunter ring and the hunt field, a lot of buyers won't even look at a black saddle. A smaller pool of buyers generally means a smaller price tag.

    Certainly there are exceptions. For example, the Black Country Vinici Tex Eventer monoflap is most commonly ordered in black leather. Since the market for monoflaps is already largely restricted to eventers, a black Vinici Tex Eventer is not any easier or harder to sell than an oakbark or brown Vinici Tex Eventer.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  15. #15
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    Jul. 25, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jo View Post
    I am still kicking myself for all the saddles I bought and sold when I was younger. I'm older and wiser now and will keep mostly anything I buy unless I have an extreme reason to sell it.
    I know what you mean. Three times I've bought back saddles that I've sold. Once I bought back the actual saddle; the other times I went out and found the same models.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



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