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  1. #21
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    But interesting how we are told something is bad and then years later are told that something is good. Coffee is one of those things
    Coffee is used as an example of how "science gets things wrong" all the time. The fact is that coffee/caffeine is studied in MANY different settings and scenarios, and yes, in some clinical situations it turns out it's quite safe, while in others it is definitely associated with increased health risks. That's because the common denominator (coffee/caffeine) is being studied for its effect on DIFFERENT THINGS. It is sloppy "health reporting" that makes declarations like "COFFEE FOUND TO BE GOOD FOR YOUR HEART" when there is no clarification of what precise parameter of heart health or disease is being discussed. Sloppy reporting is not a deficiency of good science, but rather its enemy.

    I'm not aware of any studies of coffee showing completely different results in two identical trials.

    Saturated fats are not as bad as the transfats everyone ate for years at fast food restaurants.
    Not true! The body can't really tell the difference and treats them the same. But fast food is still bad for us, regardless of what version of grease used.
    Click here before you buy.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2013
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    Hopefully at the barn
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    432

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Maybe to a human it doesn't. Bees might have slightly different sensory priorities than we do.
    Thanks! I recently got coconut oil to cook with (I love me some roasted vegetables...) and noticed that if you sniff *very* closely it does have a scent. Not entirely coco-nutty, but it is there... Just wanted to make sure the horses wouldnt become walking (running in terror?) beehives! Thanks for clearing that up
    Tack Cleaning/All-Things-Tack nut
    ~DQ wanna-be~



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
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    Where is gets way too cold
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    3,532

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    Quote Originally Posted by tidy wabbit View Post
    hydrogenated coconut oil is bad. Anything hydrogenated is bad. But coconut oil is good, in moderation.
    That's my point. The coconut oil used to induce atherosclerosis was artificially hydrogenated. Most of the stuff you buy at the store is not hydrogenated.
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
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    5,530

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    I've never cooked with it, but I've made hundreds of batches if soap with it and even had barrels of it, and never noticed a coconut scent. It could be because I use cosmetic grade coconut oil. I LOVE coconut oil for my skin and hair....but I always heard it was horrible for the arteries. *shrug*
    Last edited by hundredacres; Apr. 21, 2013 at 06:02 PM.



  5. #25
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Coconut oil is naturally mostly saturated. So not as healthy as unsaturated oils, even though it has some things in it that are relatively "better" such as Omega-3 fatty acids and shorter "chains".
    Click here before you buy.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    I use coconut oil for cooking...how in the world do you guys justify spending $$$$ for coconut oil to put on your horse's tails!?!?!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2000
    Location
    USA
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    94

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    Coconut oil does not contain or provide omega-3 fatty acids. It is a medium chain triglyceride, while corn and soy oils are long chain, and fish oil is VLCT (very long chain triglyceride).
    Coconut oil does provide Caprylic Acid (commonly used by sufferers of candida) and Lauric Acid. Lauric Acid converts to Monolaurin in the body. Coconut oil has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine, because it is considered a "cooling" food, one that will not cause imbalance of any of the three major doshas (fire,earth/water,air). In vitro monolauren has demonstrated antimicrobial and antibacterial effects.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2009
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    488

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    No input on feeding it but a friend of mine who showed cattle got me using a product called Revive for my horses' coats that is mostly coconut oil. Relatively cheap as far as coat conditioners go and it makes them look wet-shiney at shows. And it smells good too!
    It's not about the color of the ribbon but the quality of the ride. Having said that, I'd like the blue one please!



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Coconut oil does not contain or provide omega-3 fatty acids.
    True! I mis-spoke. (mis-typed) Sorry!

    Can't comment on imbalances of air, fire, earth, and water. Haven't watched any Avatar/The Last Airbender cartoons in a while.
    Click here before you buy.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
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    Maryland
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    I put some in hot water and sponge out on post clipping. Darkens up the coat and the smell is to die for.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2012
    Location
    South Carolina
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    I've been using coconut oil on my horses' tails for 4 yrs now. It does not attract bees or wasps or gnats of mosquitos or ants, and we have all of those where I board, in spades.

    Oh and it does not attract other horses, so no tail chewing! I've never offered it to my horses to ingest, so I don't know if they would eat it. They get their nutrients in their great feed and supplements.

    It does smell great. And it does not attract dirt as much as other conditions (both horse and human) I've used on my horses' tails. The dirt washes off well but if you leave the horse in the stall until the oil is absorbed into the hair, there will be less dirt adhering to the hairs. I put the oil in my palms, work it into the tail hairs, and let it stay there. If I send my horses out to pasture and the roll before the oil is absorbed (adsorbed?) it will make some sand and dirt adhere to the tail but that brushes out later. Better than the expensive human hair "leave in" products I've used to them, some of which contained coconut oil.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
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    Maryland
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    I don't feed it but I do add a dallop to a bucket of warm water for a post clipping rinse. Smells great, moisturizes and leaves them dark and shiny.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2007
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    833

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    We don't feed it, but my BO uses it on her highly allergic to everything horse. She will coat his legs with coconut oil to help ease his legs. It's a great conditioner and really helps to keep his legs from becoming so inflamed from the grass.
    Unashamed Member of the Dressage Arab Clique
    CRAYOLA POSSE= Thistle



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2010
    Location
    S. Calif.
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    743

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    I use coconut oil for cooking...how in the world do you guys justify spending $$$$ for coconut oil to put on your horse's tails!?!?!
    The Coconut Oil is much less expensive than any of the horse conditioners. It's around $5 for a large container (30 fl. oz.).



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2006
    Posts
    691

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    Quote Originally Posted by Macimage View Post
    The Coconut Oil is much less expensive than any of the horse conditioners. It's around $5 for a large container (30 fl. oz.).
    Agreed. I buy the organic fancy-schmancy stuff at Costco, 54 oz for $15. Cheaper than any horse conditioner that I've bought.



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