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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Trouble with Dad...
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    29,976

    Default Crestor?

    After running to a couple of doctors, the cardiologist gave me Crestor. (two siblings of my dad's had heart valves replaced....scared me a bit)

    I am a few weeks overdo taking it...I had some weird reaction that had me stop all my vitamins etc, then I forgot...

    And then I read the insert, with all the bad stuff that can happen...

    not feeling the warm fuzzies about the stuff....but I did go pay the man for his expertise....how bad are the side effects?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    15,614

    Default

    Do you have high cholesterol?
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2010
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    241

    Default

    Crestor for heart valves? Correct me if i am wrong but crestor is for high cholesterol. High cholestrol has little if anything to do with valve replacements to my limited knowledged. Which valves were replaced and why would be what I would want to know. (And no, I do not mean me, but if it was me.)

    I am on crestor, have been for years with no issues. High cholesterol runs in my family and even with a good diet mine is high.For what it is worth my husband has normal cholesterol, had an aortic valve replacement 10 years ago and is not on statins of any kind.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Trouble with Dad...
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    Default

    Yes, for cholesterol. They said my 'good' cholesterol was high, Doc wanted it lower.

    The heart valve thing was prompting me to have that checked, since dear Sister departed early and left me to shoulder the burden of surviving child.....

    Reminds me, I have not taken my vitamins today....

    I guess what sets me back a little was that he just put the pills in my hand....dammit, middle age sucks.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
    Posts
    777

    Default

    How high was the good cholesterol?
    It is usually considered protective.
    from: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Condit...62_Article.jsp
    Low HDL cholesterol. A major risk factor for heart disease.
    High HDL cholesterol. An HDL of 60 mg/dL and above is considered protective against heart disease.
    With HDL (good) cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL for men, less than 50 mg/dL for women) puts you at higher risk for heart disease. In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50 mg/dL. In the average woman, they range from 50 to 60 mg/dL. An HDL cholesterol of 60 mg/dL or higher gives some protection against heart disease. The mean level of HDL cholesterol for American adults age 20 and older is 54.3 mg/dL.
    Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all result in lower HDL cholesterol. To raise your HDL level, avoid tobacco smoke, maintain a healthy weight and get at least 30-60 minutes of physical activity more days than not.
    People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol and a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. Progesterone, anabolic steroids and male sex hormones (testosterone) also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Female sex hormones raise HDL cholesterol levels


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
    Posts
    777

    Default

    How high was the good cholesterol?
    It is usually considered protective.
    from: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Condit...62_Article.jsp
    Low HDL cholesterol. A major risk factor for heart disease.
    High HDL cholesterol. An HDL of 60 mg/dL and above is considered protective against heart disease.
    With HDL (good) cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL for men, less than 50 mg/dL for women) puts you at higher risk for heart disease. In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50 mg/dL. In the average woman, they range from 50 to 60 mg/dL. An HDL cholesterol of 60 mg/dL or higher gives some protection against heart disease. The mean level of HDL cholesterol for American adults age 20 and older is 54.3 mg/dL.
    Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all result in lower HDL cholesterol. To raise your HDL level, avoid tobacco smoke, maintain a healthy weight and get at least 30-60 minutes of physical activity more days than not.
    People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol and a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. Progesterone, anabolic steroids and male sex hormones (testosterone) also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Female sex hormones raise HDL cholesterol levels


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
    Posts
    777

    Default

    How high was the good cholesterol?
    It is usually considered protective.
    from: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Condit...62_Article.jsp
    Low HDL cholesterol. A major risk factor for heart disease.
    High HDL cholesterol. An HDL of 60 mg/dL and above is considered protective against heart disease.
    With HDL (good) cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL for men, less than 50 mg/dL for women) puts you at higher risk for heart disease. In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50 mg/dL. In the average woman, they range from 50 to 60 mg/dL. An HDL cholesterol of 60 mg/dL or higher gives some protection against heart disease. The mean level of HDL cholesterol for American adults age 20 and older is 54.3 mg/dL.
    Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all result in lower HDL cholesterol. To raise your HDL level, avoid tobacco smoke, maintain a healthy weight and get at least 30-60 minutes of physical activity more days than not.
    People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol and a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. Progesterone, anabolic steroids and male sex hormones (testosterone) also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Female sex hormones raise HDL cholesterol levels


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2006
    Posts
    777

    Default

    How high was the good cholesterol?
    It is usually considered protective.
    from: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Condit...62_Article.jsp
    Low HDL cholesterol. A major risk factor for heart disease.
    High HDL cholesterol. An HDL of 60 mg/dL and above is considered protective against heart disease.
    With HDL (good) cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL for men, less than 50 mg/dL for women) puts you at higher risk for heart disease. In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50 mg/dL. In the average woman, they range from 50 to 60 mg/dL. An HDL cholesterol of 60 mg/dL or higher gives some protection against heart disease. The mean level of HDL cholesterol for American adults age 20 and older is 54.3 mg/dL.
    Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all result in lower HDL cholesterol. To raise your HDL level, avoid tobacco smoke, maintain a healthy weight and get at least 30-60 minutes of physical activity more days than not.
    People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol and a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. Progesterone, anabolic steroids and male sex hormones (testosterone) also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Female sex hormones raise HDL cholesterol levels


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    7,448

    Default

    Crestor is a statin. No everyone does well with statins. There are also other cholesterol reducing drugs that work in the gut, not the liver the way the statins do (as far as I understand, which is only from reading package inserts). I was prescribed Zetia to reduce mine, because I had higher liver values at the time. I've stayed on Zetia without side effects, and I think there are other ones that work the way Zetia does. Not everyone can use every drug, and your doctor might need to change your prescription. You might just need another brand of statin, or another type, but the doctor needs to know so they can change your medications.

    Depending on your eating style, and your genetic history you might be able to change your cholesterol by exercise and diet. Some people simply can't do this, or need drugs for the short term to lower cholesterol, and then can maintain with proper diet.
    Last edited by JanM; Apr. 20, 2013 at 07:45 PM.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    11,709

    Default

    Give up WHEAT! Go back and read your own thread about Paleo!
    And Read WHEAT belly it will open your eyes, and lower your cholesterol.
    And read it starts with food, will give you a bunch of info about what statins drugs do, and why if you eat right, you will see amazing results.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    8,818

    Default

    My DH got a very bad workup and the Dr wanted to put him on statins right then and there. He opted to educate himself through the HMO's programs on diet and exercise. It worked very well for him, but his habits at the time had no where to go but better.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    High levels of the "bad" components of cholesterol are the body's reaction to a systemic inflammatory state induced by an unnatural, incorrect diet for our species, which evolved to be mostly carnivorous.

    Ditto the above--GET OFF THE GRAIN AND SUGAR, and you can get off the statin too. Which I would do ASAP; the side-effects of that stuff are in themselves threats to your health.

    BTW; trying to lower HDL in a woman is bloody daft; meta-analyses have shown that the higher her GOOD cholesterol is, the longer a woman will live. I'd seek a second opinion--STAT!

    Here's a useful book on the subject:

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Great-Chol...holesterol+con
    Last edited by Lady Eboshi; Apr. 20, 2013 at 09:41 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,555

    Default

    Crestor is newer, not off patent and is quite expensive if you do not get free packets from the Dr. Simvastatin is a generic and my DH tolerated it OK. Lipitor had very bad side effects.
    If you continue to take a statin, no matter which one, take 200 mg of CO-Q-10 daily to mitigate the damaging effect on the liver and your muscles. Drs likely will not tell you that. Read up on it.
    Drs also may not bother to check the equivalent dosage from one statin to another. They tend to just prescribe what the drug rep says is suggested - which is usually a LOT so your cholesterol numbers will go down fast... jeez. My DH was prescribed 20 mg of Lipitor vs 10 mg of Simvastatin which was working well and he was tolerating, an equivalent dosage (I found out after researching) 4 TIMES as much. Bad reaction, very weak legs. Don't blindly do what you are told, it is easy to find the equivalent dosage charts for the various statins - huge mg range from one to another.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com


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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2006
    Posts
    1,813

    Default I have a somewhat different opinion

    Not medical advice, but own personal experience:

    I have been on one statin or another since my early teens. There is a genetic defect that runs in my dad's family such that our total cholesterol normally runs in the 300-500 range, with normal HDL ("good" cholesterol), normal triglycerides and LDL ("bad" cholesterol) above 200. This is a metabolic defect; nothing we do with regards to diet or exercise makes a difference. Before statins, there was not a single affected male on that side of the family who lived past 50. They all had heart attacks starting in their 30s and sometime in their 40s, either "The Big One" happened or they died of heart failure. In the early 80s (before statins), one of my uncles tried desperately to cut out all fat and all processed sugar from his diet. He was a physically active guy who exercised regularly. He still died of a massive heart attack at 38, just keeled over in a parking lot in front of his kids. With statins, my father and his remaining sibs and cousins are in their 60s and 70s, basically healthy. Dad was a patient in some of the very first human drug studies of statins and is still on a statin plus an additional experimental drug. So obviously, for my family, statins are truly miracle, life saving drugs and I'm a big time fan

    That being said, like any drug, there are side effects and rarely, serious side effects. I think that it's blown WAY out of proportion. After all, penicillin antibiotics can both cure infections AND cause life threatening reactions in the allergic.

    However, in 20 years, I've only had two problems with statins. One time my liver enzymes (which your doc should check periodically) were a bit high when I had my blood work done while on a statin plus antibiotics for a sinus infection. I had repeat labs done a month later, off the antibiotic, and everything was back to normal. The second problem was a little more annoying but still temporary and fixable. I developed really bad muscle aches after about 10 years on Lipitor, for no apparent reason. My doc had me off meds for a few months to let things settle down, and then switched me to Zocor. I've been on it (well now generic simvastatin) for 8 years with no problem and great response in my lipids.

    There is one other issue with statins that is theoretical for me since I'm single and have no plans to have kids ever. In pregnant women, they're thought to be associated with some rare, serious birth defects involving the brain. My sisters, who are both married, have to be extra careful with BC and go off the meds if they ever want to get pregnant.

    So my opinion is that yes, diet/exercise/lifestyle is important and no one's saying you should eat Big Macs and be a couch potato. But if you try lifestyle modification and your cholesterol is still too high, a statin is a pretty good option. And if you're one of the rare few who just doesn't tolerate it, there are other drugs out there.

    BES
    Proudly owned by 2 chestnut mares
    Crayola Posse: sea green
    Mighty Rehabbers Clique


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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    986

    Default

    One of my good friends (a BO and instructor, so very active lifestyle) had a cholesterol reading of 360. She discussed meds with her dr but was nervous about side effects, and they jointly decided to do a 6-month diet and exercise trial. My friend pretty much cut out all cholesterol from her diet, really cleaned it up, and brought her cholesterol down...to 320. She is on a very low-dose statin and now has cholesterol in the low 200s.
    My point of the story is that diet and exercise absolutely play a part, but some people have genetics that they can't avoid. Everything in medicine is a risk-benefit analysis. Sometimes the benefits outweigh the risks.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Former owner of the best Amish-carthorse-turned-eventer ever


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  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Trouble with Dad...
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    Default

    I suppose the biggest problem for me was that I have done nothing other than meds to work on the problem.
    (and I was at the time doing the 2nd round of antibiotics for something else, part of what prompted me to even go to the doctors and get all of the issues squared away)

    I guess I am going to shelf the meds for now, learn to read my labs.....the nurse said the good cholesterol was 147, the doc wanted it at 80 kind of blew what little I knew out of the water....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    7,448

    Default

    Try the DASH diet, or the Mediterranean Diet to see if you can lower your cholesterol also-they are both supposed to be very good for that, and have been proven by long-term studies, with many participants. If the Triglycerides are high, then try limiting fruit, especially canteloupe and other high sweetness fruits and melons. And hormones can certainly affect this, because after menopause a lot of women have problems with cholesterol/triglycerides that didn't before.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Anything in your lipids profile is not, in itself, a "disease," though the medical industry makes billions treating it like one. It is, technically, only a "finding" which may mean anything or nothing, and can only be interpreted in the context of your diet, lifestyle, job, stress level, genetics, socio-economic status, temperament, etc.

    But MD's today don't get reimbursed for knowing any of that, let alone taking the time to talk to you about your life and your choices and what factors you might be able to take control of. Further, the advice they hand out on diet (a subject on which they have very little training beyond the boilerplate) is just plain wrong. The more grain, fruit, and sugar you eat, not to mention processed food, the worse your numbers across the board will get--because eating this stuff is the precursor to troubling findings in lipids, BP, blood sugar and insulin resistance, etc.
    But variations in lipid analysis alone are NOT in themselves heart disease, are not necessarily even INDICATIVE of incipient heart disease, and have never been proven (anywhere) to be a CAUSE of heart disease. But you'd never know that listening to the Crestor commercials!

    As usual, modern medicine cares nothing for changing the negative circumstances underlying chronic disease--they just put a band-aid on the most easily measurable symptoms, which is what a statin is. The uncomfortable truth everyone needs to know, is that the way the system is presently set up, most of the time they can only be reimbursed for the office visit if they write a prescription; and they may also be getting incentives from the drug's manufactuer.

    (BTW, I specifically made an exception in my earlier post for those with the rare, genetic, hypercholesterol problem a poster above brought up.)


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