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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2013
    Posts
    23

    Default commision. how do i handle this?

    I've had my horse on the market since November and while he has had a lot of interest (particularly lately) he still has not sold. It's nothing against his current trainer (we previously had differences that we have recently overcome) but I would like to move him to a new trainer who can market him better for what we have him advertised as. I currently have him marketed as an Venter with a hunter/jumper coach and I would like to move him to an evening trainer so that I can better reach that realm of people

    However, how do I handle the commission aspect of it? I have been paying for training from this current trainer every month. Will I still owe her a commission when he sells even if he is with another trainer?

    I know this probably sounds like a stupid question, but I don't want to get into paying double amounts of money, or if I do I want to at least be prepared for it.

    What if someone who has been in contact with my current trainer regarding my horse comes and try's him out when I have him with this new trainer? Should I take him out of training with my current trainer and off the market until I can move him? I understand I may have to move him earlier than my notice gives and am prepared to lose money on that.

    I hope my questions are making sense



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Posts
    5,926

    Default

    I wouldn't think you owe her anything if you have been giving paying her for training, board, etc...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    If you have been paying the first trainer for the board and training she has provided (and it sounds like you have), you owe her nothing further. After the horse goes to the new trainer, if the new trainer sells it s/he is due whatever commission you two have agreed upon. If someone who looked at the horse while it was in trainer #1's hands returns and buys it while it is with trainer #2, trainer #2 still receives the commission since trainer #2 is the one actually closing the deal. When selling a decent horse there usually are a lot of interested buyers, but drumming up interested buyers is not the same as actually getting a sale finalized.

    Personally once the horse left trainer #!'s care I probably wouldn't discuss any further nitty gritty details regarding the horse's sale with trainer #1 even if we remained on friendly terms.

    I don't think it is necessary to pull the horse off the market. Most likely trainer #1, knowing that the horse is leaving will slow down on any efforts to sell the horse. I wouldn't post any new ads during that last month though. Now, if you think that trainer #2 is going to have some brilliant new marketing plan for your horse or is planning to advertise the horse at a higher price than the currently advertised one, then in that case I would go ahead and pull the ads and temporarily remove the horse from the market.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2003
    Posts
    3,589

    Default

    Read your contract - what does it say? If you don't have a contract to pay her sales commission, then you are not owe her a penny if you move the horse and sell it through someone else.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,105

    Default

    if the sales lead results from first trainer's lead... split the commision 50/50 other wise they get nothing

    nevertheless unless everyone has a full understanding of who is to get what; in the future you may have a hard time selling a horse with any trainer as word (and you know Horse World) does get around and usually the "word" is based more on rumor than fact



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    I doubt too many trainers would be willing to take on a sales horse knowing that they might have to split the commission 50-50 if the previous trainer stakes a claim. That would create a very awkward situation for all parties. The current trainer has had plenty of time to market the horse, spread word through her contacts, and show it to interested parties. If there is a buyer who is very close to buying the horse before it leaves the first trainer's barn, I'd just leave the horse at her barn for a few extra days until it gets sorted out.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2008
    Posts
    3,531

    Default

    Look it this way. If you were to put your house on the market and hired Abc realtors to sell it for you, it's on the market for 6 months, your contract ends and no sale. So you hire another realtor, the house sells - you are under no obligation to give Abc realtors a commission. By moving your horse to another trainer to sell it, then I would assume that would nullify your contract. Once you move the horse to another trainer, I might send something to the first trainer in writing stating that your sales contract is being terminated and as such under no obligation to pay any commission upon the sale of the horse.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,464

    Default

    Just curious, but why do you consider the horse an event horse? Is he not suitable for hunters/jumpers? Too bad is that is the case because the sales prices tend to be higher in the sector of the market. If your horse is an event horse, does he have a record? Several of my horses event and I have been involved in eventing for many years. IMHO, many people who event are looking for lower dollar horses. Not everyone, but you just don't see the huge prices for the average horse. I wish that was the case, but it has not been my experience. If the horse can do H/J work as well as eventing, then I would change my advertising to reflect that. And the fact you are getting lots of people looking is a good thing. As a seller of horses I can tell you that most prospective buyers look and do not buy. Nothing wrong with that, but I expect to show a horse multiple times to make a sale. In fact, I'm showing a couple today, one of whom has been looked at multiple times. Horse selling takes patience.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
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