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  1. #41
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackwly View Post
    The 2 flakes of alfalfa a day and 30 min of turnout is a California thing. Mind-boggling to those of us on that started eventing on the east coast I realize. It is pretty typical out there to feed low-roughage high-protein diets which makes dealing with any hot horse a nightmare (not to mention the resulting colic, soft tissue injuries, etc etc.... can you tell I was glad to move back to TN?)

    To the OP, best bet is going to be getting him lots of turnout (and not in a round pen- somewhere he can run around). This means something like 8+ hours a day. He also needs lots of low protein roughage - "cheaper" hay like a mixed grass, fescue or even timothy would be much better and I'd stop the alfalfa all together. Look for something he can much on all day. However, good luck finding those in Southern CA.....

    Bottom line is this might not be a horse that can tolerate the fancy-facility lifestyle. I had 2 of those myself!

    Yeah I grew up in Hawaii where we had limited turn out (at most farms) and having Hay was very very very expensive. That said, we fed hay cubes over concentrates. Most horses got just hay cubes and a few got concentrates...and the very special ones got a flake of hay. We also were trained as kids to hand graze A LOT.

    So I do totally understand that lifestyle. After living on the east coast....I don't think I could go back to that. And I know that most of my horses that I own now would not adapt well to it.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  2. #42
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    Dec. 4, 2006
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    New York
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    Default OP, could you clarify

    I'm thinking you read "turnout" as "work" - as in you're riding him 30 minutes/day.

    How much time out in a paddock/field is he getting?



  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by KayBee View Post
    I'm thinking you read "turnout" as "work" - as in you're riding him 30 minutes/day.

    How much time out in a paddock/field is he getting?

    Nope...knowing CA...that is 30 minutes in a paddock. They otherwise are in stalls...typically bigger stalls sometimes with a small run. But out in a paddock...or even more, out in a paddock with grass is typically very limited at a lot of facilities.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
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    333

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    Just to add my two cents...

    I have an older Trak mare who was boarded at a small co-op for a couple of years and was an angel 99.9 percent of the time. Moved her to a full boarding barn last summer when we thought we were moving ourselves...mare got thrown out into a field with 8 or so other mares and her mind was BLOWN. She was never horrible in terms of being dangerous. But there were several screaming meltdowns to be had when leaving her new found best friends. And this is an old gal that I would put just about anyone on. Sometimes - changes in environment (particularly if they are very different from where the horse previously was) just take a bit longer. I might also add, I have shown my mare frequently and have never, ever had an issue with her at a show. So - just goes to show you horses are still horses...no matter how great they might usually be.

    It sounds like in this case, major changes were made very quickly. To top it off, he was already green.

    I have read a few of your other threads and understand you have experience with greenies, but I'm just curious why you would continue to pick what appear to be super green horses when it seems like you're quickly getting burned out on the whole deal?

    Remember that ultimately, riding and horse ownership (while a ton of work, yes) are supposed to be FUN. It is too damn expensive of a hobby/lifestyle to boil down to being anything but.

    I've had too much crap happen in my life over the past few months for this not to be fun and ultimately a stress reliever for me. Why would you not want it to be the same? Similar to you, I can handle the greenies and I do find pleasure in working with different types of horses, but why - if you're getting burned out - should you stick to it just because, unless you're truly head over heels for this horse?

    If you're going to lease...heck, lease something experienced and AWESOME that you can learn from and work on YOU and have fun for a while...just my opinion.
    Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue.

    A Voice Halted



  5. #45
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    Dec. 4, 2006
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    New York
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    Quote Originally Posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
    Nope...knowing CA...that is 30 minutes in a paddock. They otherwise are in stalls...typically bigger stalls sometimes with a small run. But out in a paddock...or even more, out in a paddock with grass is typically very limited at a lot of facilities.
    Yikes - and I thought the 4 hours/day at my barn was bad.



  6. #46
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    Mar. 25, 2010
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    Have been following your threads hoping for a positive outcome. How is Sriracha coming along? Has she settled down? WEre you able to try any of the suggestions to cut back on the alfalfa and grain and try to get her out more, even if it is only hand walking?

    Wishing you luck on finding a suitable horse to ride and enjoy.



  7. #47
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreyStreet View Post
    I have read a few of your other threads and understand you have experience with greenies, but I'm just curious why you would continue to pick what appear to be super green horses when it seems like you're quickly getting burned out on the whole deal?
    He didn't seem super green when I tried him. Also, I chose this particular lease situation because it has a buy option included, which most leases on experienced, talented, show seasoned eventers do not (or, if they do, they are out of my price range). I posted this thread mostly to address my surprise at finding him to be so much greener than he seemed when I tried him.

    I did ride him and he was actually very well behaved. I've been using a stud chain to walk and we've practiced everything from entering and exiting the wash rack to walking over tarps. He is much improved.

    However, I just found out on Monday that I pregnant with my first baby. My doctor advised against riding. If I had my old guy, I would probably keep riding, but since I have only unfamiliar green prospects in my life right now, I probably will have to end the lease and resume my search in a year or so. All my trouble finding a horse kind of makes sense now, though. Clearly the timing wasn't right.



  8. #48
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Not right timing for a horse but congrats on your soon to be here baby! That is more exciting than a new horse. Horses will be there when you are ready again.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #49
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    Jul. 10, 2006
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    Ohhhh, that's wonderful news Have a very happy pregnancy and new baby.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
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    Aug. 3, 2009
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    Could it be, that he had some herd buddies (herd bound) and when you rode there, he was around them, so was comfortable. Being thrown in a trailer and perhaps by himself, he just got thrown off. Time, patience and human buddy will help him settle



  11. #51
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    Oct. 17, 2007
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    CO
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    Congratulations!! Being a mom is the best thing ever, even if it does make riding (and eventing in particular) about one million times more difficult!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
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    Sep. 14, 1999
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    Just Enough Farm, GA
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    Congratulations on your pregnancy!!
    If you believe everything you read, better not read. -- Japanese Proverb



    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by HealingHeart View Post
    Could it be, that he had some herd buddies (herd bound) and when you rode there, he was around them, so was comfortable. Being thrown in a trailer and perhaps by himself, he just got thrown off. Time, patience and human buddy will help him settle
    Interesting thought! He did seeem very connected with another young gelding at his old barn. They were even in turn out together when I arrived. I wouldn't be surprised at all if that had something to do with it.



  14. #54
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fergs View Post
    Congratulations!! Being a mom is the best thing ever, even if it does make riding (and eventing in particular) about one million times more difficult!
    Lol, I'm going to take your word on that. I've had and loved horses my whole life. I've never had a baby! I know I will love the little peanut insanely, but I'm definitely nervous. It's one thing to talk about having a baby, it's another thing to find out you're actually pregnant. Such a shock. Can you look at my "Advice on staying involved with horses during pregnancy" post, if you get the chance, and share your input / experience? I've seen so many friends give up their hobbies to have kids and I'm scared that will happen to me. I want to be proactive and intentional about not letting myself do that.



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