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  1. #1

    Default Old dog - how do you KNOW they are going deaf?

    I can't figure out if Pippin (12 year old Pug) is going deaf, is entirely deaf or has selective hearing.

    He'll be hanging out - I'll call him, but he doesn't respond. Yet, he'll start barking at the UPS truck before it even turns up the lane. Sometimes he'll be the one to start barking, but mostly it seems he responds to Xander's barking.

    The other thing that worries me is that he acts almost senile sometimes. For example, at bed time, he'll walk into the bedroom and stop. I'll be calling him towards the bed, and he just stands there for a minute, like he can't put together why he's standing in the bedroom and why I'm calling him to me.

    He still plays a lot with the other 2 Pugs, still plays with his toys at his usual level (he never was one for a lot of toy playing). He's getting obnoxiously protective of me, to the point I hesitate to have him on my lap.

    I've had lots of senior dogs in my life, but never one with these behaviors. Any input?
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  2. #2
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    Oct. 22, 2009
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    Fill up his food bowl when he's not looking. We knew my dog had gone from 'hard-of-hearing" to full on deaf when we could bang her food bowl two feet from her and she never turned her head.
    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I can't decide if I should saddle up the drama llama, dust off the clue bat, or get out my soapbox.


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  3. #3
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    I free feed kibble. He follows me to the kitchen any time I go there because he's pretty sure steak will fall from heaven.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  4. #4
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    Oct. 29, 2007
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    Snap your fingers near his ear when he's laying down. My normal hearing dog would give an ear twitch (I'm assuming the sound didn't hurt since he didn't even bother to wake up ) but the old going-deaf dog wouldn't even notice if you clapped your hands.
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  5. #5
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    Jun. 22, 2004
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    Well, since I'm apparently incapable of snapping my fingers, I held my cell phone behind him and rang the alarm. He jerked and looked at me like "where's the fruit bat" - so I guess not totally deaf. The privilege if old age - they get to ignore us on their terms.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Oct. 28, 2007
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    He may be able to hear some frequencies and not others. I have difficulty hearing low pitched voices, but am fine with higher pitched (usually female) voices.
    The UPS truck probably rumbles(vibrates) as much as it makes sounds. So your dog may be hearing somethings fine and others not at all.
    If he sleeps on your bed, want to get him a ramp so he can get up easily?



  7. #7
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chall View Post
    He may be able to hear some frequencies and not others. I have difficulty hearing low pitched voices, but am fine with higher pitched (usually female) voices.
    The UPS truck probably rumbles(vibrates) as much as it makes sounds. So your dog may be hearing somethings fine and others not at all.
    If he sleeps on your bed, want to get him a ramp so he can get up easily?
    ^^Yep, this.

    When my dog lost much of his hearing my vet said that people often miss the signs because certain ranges go before others. The range in which we can hear and in which we speak is one of the last ranges to go - they lose the highs and the lows first, but since we can't hear them we don't realize, until they start "ignoring" us. You can sometimes tell by their behavior though, they may appear to sleep more deeply, or to be nervous in situations where they can't see as well (backyard at night) because they know they can't rely on their hearing like they used to do. (That was a big sign for us with my old dog - he would not stray very far from the house at night).

    If you think he's losing his hearing, he most likely is - it's quite common.

    I agree that the UPS truck probably creates a vibration. And we communicated with our dog through vibrations a lot when his hearing went - we'd stomp the floor when we came in the house, for example, so we didn't scare him if he was sleeping in another room.


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  8. #8
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    My 13-year-old dog has gotten to the point where she can hear certain things, but can't quite place where they're coming from--you can see her alert and look around, but she's really confused. Also, I can now get home, shut the door, and have my other dog barking before she wakes up finally when I yell her name.

    She does, however, hear the treat jar across the house and in her sleep.
    "Remain relentlessly cheerful."

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarahandSam View Post
    My 13-year-old dog has gotten to the point where she can hear certain things, but can't quite place where they're coming from--you can see her alert and look around, but she's really confused. Also, I can now get home, shut the door, and have my other dog barking before she wakes up finally when I yell her name.

    She does, however, hear the treat jar across the house and in her sleep.
    Hahahah same hear. My old man can hear a loud squeaky toy behind his head: he flinches and snaps his head... to the exact opposite direction of where the toy is. He can hear hand clapping right above his head. Or is he feeling the slight wind my hands create? He's gone from "selective hearing" to hard of hearing. A guest can knock, open the door, and stand in the living room without him being aware until he sees the person.



  10. #10
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    Jan. 9, 2003
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    I thought maybe one of my 13 yo's was starting to become hard of hearing. I'd call and she'd ignore. Since she's been through a couple of levels of obedience and has pretty good recall, I thought hearing. Then, one day last week I called her from quite a distance. She turned and looked directly at me and then turned back around and continued what she was doing. So now I'm not so sure I can blame her deteriorating recall on hearing.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



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