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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
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    Default Gardeners -- Will this Work?

    I have the opportunity to create a brand new gardening landscape in my yard this year, due to some construction that currently has that yard looking like a battleground.

    My thought is to pull all of my gardens together into one large garden, surrounding the new sunroom that is the cause of all of this devastation. I'm hoping that will make it easier for me to manage as I age.

    I currently have over 30 varieties of daylilies. I'm not quite sure of the exact number, because some of them have been trampled or buried and I don't know if they will come back. Those Daylilies are going to be the focal point and the common thread through the new garden. I have a few varieties of coneflowers, hostas and maybe a couple of hellebores that I will also transplant.

    I stopped at a large gardening center today. They had a large selection of native flowers that had just come in. I went crazy. I bought trilliums, columbines, trout lilies, jack-in-the-pulpits and several others that I can't remember right now. Along with a couple more hellebores, because I couldn't resist them.

    After all of that, here's the question. What I'm thinking is that most of the natives are Spring flowers. They will be done, and, in most cases, have died back, by the time that the daylilies really take off in height. Am I right in thinking that the daylilies, therefore, will not crowd or overshadow the natives to the point where the natives die off? Or, would it be better to plant part of the garden in natives, and part in the daylilies?
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2012
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    knee deep in Oregon mud
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    Default

    I am NOT a flower gardener (I possess the "black thumb of death" when it comes to flowers), but this is how many of my neighbors have their yards set up. As long as everything comes up at different times you shouldn't have a problem with crowding or overshadowing. The gardener that set up my yard planted a variety of bulbs for me for the same effect. Daffodils to start, followed by tulips, followed by lilys and then iris. All I have to do is trim the plants back when they start looking shabby/brown. So far so good, I haven't managed to kill anything yet.
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Greenville, MI,
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    Default

    The only thing I hate about Day lilys is that there leaves get very obnoxious and get rather abundant, and I hate the way they look when they are finally done blooming. Just one opinion.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Default

    Daylilies can get very root bound, so I would plant everything in masses. You get a bigger impact. I don't think you have to worry about overshadowing (if you mean that literally) the more delicate plants, but you might have a problem with getting crowded out by the roots. So I wouldn't nestle the new plants too closely to the daylilies. Having said that, close is a relative term, because the lily roots don't expand that fast.

    And by the way, one year my SO thought my new spring daylilies were grass and mowed them to the ground. It didn't hurt them in the least. I think your daylilies which have been dug up are totally salvageable. They are so tough. Mine were a gift separated from an overgrown clump belonging to a relative in Fairbanks, Alaska. Now I live in Southern California and the daylilies do great here as well. They are ubiquitous in public areas, especially along roads.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    I have the opportunity to create a brand new gardening landscape in my yard this year, due to some construction that currently has that yard looking like a battleground.

    My thought is to pull all of my gardens together into one large garden, surrounding the new sunroom that is the cause of all of this devastation. I'm hoping that will make it easier for me to manage as I age.

    I currently have over 30 varieties of daylilies. I'm not quite sure of the exact number, because some of them have been trampled or buried and I don't know if they will come back. Those Daylilies are going to be the focal point and the common thread through the new garden. I have a few varieties of coneflowers, hostas and maybe a couple of hellebores that I will also transplant.

    I stopped at a large gardening center today. They had a large selection of native flowers that had just come in. I went crazy. I bought trilliums, columbines, trout lilies, jack-in-the-pulpits and several others that I can't remember right now. Along with a couple more hellebores, because I couldn't resist them.

    After all of that, here's the question. What I'm thinking is that most of the natives are Spring flowers. They will be done, and, in most cases, have died back, by the time that the daylilies really take off in height. Am I right in thinking that the daylilies, therefore, will not crowd or overshadow the natives to the point where the natives die off? Or, would it be better to plant part of the garden in natives, and part in the daylilies?
    Louise,
    Here is a really nice blog about underplanting:
    http://awaytogarden.com/10-thoughts-...-underplanting


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteyPie View Post
    Louise,
    Here is a really nice blog about underplanting:
    http://awaytogarden.com/10-thoughts-...-underplanting
    That's a great blog post, PeteyPie! Very helpful. Thank you!
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
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    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
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    9,259

    Default

    I cannot claim to be anything remotely like a Master Gardener - things here live in spite of me, not because of me
    But I have found lilies to be amazingly hardy.

    I got an amazing bargain my first year here: 100 Asiatic lily bulbs for $35
    I planted them in my "meadow" (euphemistically-named field in back of the house) and the first year they made a small showing.
    2nd year they seemd to be coming back stronger.......
    That's when my mower died, and I asked a neighbor to help me out cutting my lawn.
    Came home to find she had mowed down Every.Last.Lily.

    So no display that year - but they all came back the next year and have continued to spread every year since.

    Daylilies here are sometimes called Ditch Lilies because they are so hardy.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  8. #8
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Default

    Well, you inspired me to water my front yard patio plants, which led to pruning my too-tall spiny evergreen topiaries (what IS that stuff??? It's like a cyprus from Hell) and now I am itchy and covered in red scratches and welts.



  9. #9
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Yeh, 2DogsFarm, daylillies are hardy all right. I'll go digging for the roots after they're through with the construction and see what I can find. They may come back. Some of mine are pretty fancy, though, and with fancy, also can come more delicate.

    PeteyPie, I'm sorry inspiration lead to discomfort. But, I bet they look much better now.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
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    Yes Daylilies are very hardy, which is why I have them in my yard (bit of a "brown" thumb here too). I have some right by the road, they get salted in winter, snowed-in, they still come back beautifully. My kind of plants!


    I've been experimenting with native plants too, those columbine are gorgeous! I wish they'd last longer. Then I planted a few native, fragrant flowering bushes that had a hard time last year (1st year), we'll see how they fare this year. Hostas are great for shady areas. To have color all summer long I just plant impatiens in pots and here and there in the yard.

    Our big project, right now, is to manage to actually have GRASS growing in our backyard, and surviving the summer! I hate to have to water it. *sigh*

    I'm in the northeast, and apart from crocus and hyacinths, not much is blooming right now, but I know it's just going to "explode" in the very near future. It just seems everything is late this year.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    I stopped at a large gardening center today. They had a large selection of native flowers that had just come in. I went crazy. I bought trilliums, columbines, trout lilies, jack-in-the-pulpits and several others that I can't remember right now. Along with a couple more hellebores, because I couldn't resist them.
    My first thought is that if you're planting all of the above around your Daylilies, which obviously require full sun, that you need to realize that Trilliums, Trout Lilies, Jack-in-the-Pulpits, & Lord knows what others you bought are full-shade woodland plants. They will not survive in a full-sun environment. The Columbines are the only ones that can deal with full sun, & even they prefer partial shade during the hottest part of the day.

    And while Daylilies can deal with less-than-perfect environmental conditions, the woodland plants you listed really need well-composted humousy soil - they won't survive long in the same environment that Daylilies happily deal with.



  12. #12
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    My first thought is that if you're planting all of the above around your Daylilies, which obviously require full sun, that you need to realize that Trilliums, Trout Lilies, Jack-in-the-Pulpits, & Lord knows what others you bought are full-shade woodland plants. They will not survive in a full-sun environment. The Columbines are the only ones that can deal with full sun, & even they prefer partial shade during the hottest part of the day.

    And while Daylilies can deal with less-than-perfect environmental conditions, the woodland plants you listed really need well-composted humousy soil - they won't survive long in the same environment that Daylilies happily deal with.
    Good point on the soil. I better make sure that I plant them in the good stuff.

    I have nothing but shade and part shade around here, and my daylilies flourish. They are amazingly adaptable. Here are a few pictures. They were wonderful last year.
    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342580.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342579.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342577.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342576.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342575.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL721/13437073/24311141/406342556.jpg

    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  13. #13
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    Good point on the soil. I better make sure that I plant them in the good stuff.

    I have nothing but shade and part shade around here, and my daylilies flourish. They are amazingly adaptable. Here are a few pictures. They were wonderful last year.
    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342580.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342579.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342577.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342576.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../406342575.jpg

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL721/13437073/24311141/406342556.jpg

    Gorgeous!



  14. #14
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    Nov. 17, 2006
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    Yeah, just be careful on which need sun and which need more shade. Your Hostas will likely need more shade than your daylillies. And usually you want to mix up your leaf shapes. Long grassy daylillies next to something mounded next to something spikey, etc. And if you can get varigated leaves next to solid green leaves next to red leaves, etc., that makes it more interesting. Depending on where you're located, irises are also fail proof! Mine are just now starting to bloom, so nice early spring bloomers. Daylillies, too, can bloom at different times depending on the kind. And there are some that are rebloomers that will bloom again later in the year (same with Irises). And my favorite if you have some space is the Knockout Roses. EASY care and they are prolific bloomers. Good luck. 'Tis the season!
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  15. #15
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    Oooh thanks for mentioning the Knockout roses. I did a search and found out there is ONE variety of knockout roses that is fragrant and easy care, called Sunny (yellow rose). They'd be perfect for my backyard, by the door / window...
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



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