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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2003
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    San Antonio, TX
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    2,349

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    My mom, my sister, and I spent Thanksgiving down in Fairhope, AL at the Grand Resort, and went shopping on Black Friday. We ate at Panini Pete's, which has apparently been featured on Food Network's "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives." There were a couple of families next to use and their kids were sitting at a table next to them. Out of nowhere, one of the boys, probably about 10, declares, "I know why this sandwich tastes to good. It's pro-SHU-to (prosciutto)!" That for some reason cracked us up, so now whenever anything is better than we expect it to be, we say it's because of the "pro-SHU-to!"
    Jonah 4:4: And the Lord said, "Do you do well to be angry?"

    With every day that passes, college football season gets that much closer!



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
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    1,778

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    One of my favorites is "fizzigated". Our 2 year old daughter said this when grandma and I were trying to help her into her snowsuit. She said we should leave her alone because she was getting "all fizzigated"...a toddler version for frustrated.

    maybe.maybe not. Same daughter, young adult giving directions from the back seat. Dad asks "Is that light up there where we turn left?" She says "maybe. maybe not". Ummm...ya...those would be the choices. We use it whenever there's 2 choices.

    "shiterator" my 2 year old niece (now and adult with teens of her own) word for refridgerator.

    hum...my toddler son's word for "yes". One time I said "NO"! He said "hum" I said NO NO NO. He said "hum hum hum".
    Ride like you mean it.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
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    the Armpit of the Nation
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    3,160

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    You mean excessive spit or something else exuding from male dogs only?

    My mom grew up with a basset hound and their drool was "schpook."
    Schmool is the drippage from the weiner. I like schpook



  4. #24
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2006
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    752

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    I once was travelling with good good friends and we visited some of the relatives in backwoods Kentucky (quite literally the 'hollar' -- a few little houses nestled right between two mountains). Anyway, after dinner one night, one of the relatives leans back in her chair and says:

    "That was so good my tongue jumped out my head and slapped me on the brain!"

    I still have no idea exactly what it means, but love it!
    To be loved by a horse should fill us with awe, for we hath not deserved it.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
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    the Armpit of the Nation
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    These stories are so wonderful!

    My grandma was a Brooklyn-born (1897) Litvak - that's a Lithuanian. She always wore an industrial strength girdle and her "rubba stockings" for her poor circulation, brassiere, and a slip.

    Whenever we would help her out of the car, she would mutter, "Pretty good...'see awll a' New York for a nickel' " Prying her out of the backseat of my '74 Mustang hatchback always ellicited this classic

    Granma didn't learn to drive. Too nervous. It was fun driving her - she'd always pull out her rosary and we'd hear "JESUS MARY AND JOSEPH! JESUS MARY AND JOSEPH!" I use this a lot in homage.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
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    3,472

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    Thanks to my 6 year old niece, St. Patrick's Day will forever be knows and Leprechaunica. We have no idea where she came up with it???

    Any kind of plain soda water, tonic water or seltzer water is "fuzzy water".

    And hot sauce is referred to as soup because my one night my mom was making dinner and had put stuff on the table already including a small bowl of super hot asian hot sauce that was my dad's favorite. She had turned around and was facing the stove when my youngest brother (i'm thinking he was like 4 or so) came into the kitchen and took a big spoonful and started screaming "I thought it was soup, I thought it was soup"- poor kid.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2004
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    City of delusion in the state of total denial
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    8,486

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    My dad said "Search me" or "Beats the heck out of me" in lieu of "I have no idea." "Search me" especially seems to have been a peculiarity of his; I used that in conversation with my male boss and he told me he could not reply to anything I just said lest I and his wife smack him simultaneously. (My English ex-boyfriend also used it, which makes me think it might be one of the little pieces of Brit-speak my dad seemed to have used for uncertain reasons.)

    This isn't so much an expression as a glorious family tradition invented by one of my cousins. The family joke is that we put the "fun" in "dysfunction," and if we get through a holiday without someone walking out of the house (with or without shoes) or something important breaking, we've done a great job. We don't always do a very good job. So, when someone is being a jerk, someone else starts "The D Chant." It goes:
    A-5! 6! 5-6-7-8!
    (And then everyone chimes in, clapping hands: )
    Douche-bag! Douche-bag! Douche-bag!
    (while staring at the offending party.)

    Believe it or not, this usually defuses the problem.
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
    - Harry Dresden

    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
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    2,301

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    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    We have "colder then a witch's tit"
    We have "colder than a mother-in-law's kiss" and "harder than a streetwalker's heart"

    Many of Mom's steaks have been referred to as "tougher than wang leather"

    oh, and "shtuff" sh!t + stuff

    Renn - you guys would probably fit in at our family get togethers. "Go to Hell!" is considered a greeting/term of endearment. That's probably why my BIL hasn't shown up for the last 3 holiday shindigs.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2013
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    29

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    We have many. My favorite is an exclamation of celebration. When our son was about eight months old, DH and I were out and about in the car when spontaneously and exuberantly from the back seat he sang out, "Airaboobah!" He never said it again but DH and I have been using it ever since. Son is now 26.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2010
    Location
    yonder a bit, GA
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    3,256

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    Thought of another- Our tiny kitchen has this ANCIENT oven built into a tower against the wall (so no stovetop). There's also an oven and stovetop next to it, which is newer but still older than myself by a good decade (it has- as a feature of the model- suggested cook times for various casseroles/etc). Anyway, we use that one for cooking. The tower oven has cabinets below and above it, and it freaked us out too much to even try to see if it would not burn down the house, so instead we use that oven as a storage drawer. drawer + oven = dwarven.
    We were just cleaning up from dinner tonight and MrB asked me where to put the skillet. "Oh it stays in the dwarven."

    I was teaching/counseling horsey summer camp one year in high school and helping the tiny kids cinch up girths. One pony stepped on my foot, and i fought every urge not to curse (I then had a baaaad mouth at times!) and, while throwing elbows into the pony to get him off my foot uttered "Fuuuuc-ooooo..chiee...woooo...rigght okay" I was retelling my near slip up to my friend that night at 2am and we were sleep deprived and silly and fagucci (sometimes spelled facucci) became a word we started to use all the time. fagucci could be an exhasperated expletive, a befuddled question, a contented sigh.... all depending on the tone.
    MrB's attempt at talking like a horse person, "We'll be entering in the amateur hunter-gatherer division...."



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
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    35,040

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn/aissance View Post
    My dad said "Search me" or "Beats the heck out of me" in lieu of "I have no idea." .... (My English ex-boyfriend also used it, which makes me think it might be one of the little pieces of Brit-speak my dad seemed to have used for uncertain reasons.)
    Yes, I think it is/was pretty standard British usage.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  12. #32
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    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Nokesville, VA
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    "ombled eggs"
    When my mother tried to make an omelette, she couldn't resist "fussing" with it, ending up with something in between an omelette and scrambled eggs. Hence ombled eggs.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2004
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    City of delusion in the state of total denial
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    Yes, I think it is/was pretty standard British usage.
    Where my father, who grew up in Maryland to parents of German Jew and Swedish descent and to my knowledge never left the USA until his honeymoon, picked up so many Brit expressions, I have no idea.

    In defense of the D Chant and my family in general, we all like each other (well, mostly.) So it isn't so much pejorative in actual practice as "Hey, simmer down." In public it's abbreviated to just the 5-6-7-8! part, in the interest of manners.
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
    - Harry Dresden

    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG



  14. #34
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,105

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    In the midst of the lovely Florida humidity, my dad calls it "air you can wear".
    Tin Roof Living- Custom Wreaths & Home Décor
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/TinRoofLiving?ref=ss_profile
    PM me to receive a COTH discount!


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  15. #35
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    14,888

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    Quote Originally Posted by lovey1121 View Post
    Schmool is the drippage from the weiner. I like schpook
    Jesus. That schmool didn't need to exist, let alone be a word.

    Schpook is for basset hound spit in particular. Think long, snot-like strings hanging down, waiting to get on you.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  16. #36
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2005
    Posts
    830

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    My mom had some good ones, usually said when she was mad:

    "I'm so mad I could spit nails!"
    or
    "That really puckers my grommet!"

    My ex husband, an Argentine, had some good ones too:
    for a rare piece of art or any item he would call it a

    "piece of museum"
    for anything/person derogatory he would call it a

    "goddam piece of shoot"

    I heard a good one the other day-a saying about being selfish-

    "like a dog on a haystack" meaning that the dog doesnt eat hay
    but is keeping anything else from eating it.

    love these kinds of threads!



  17. #37
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    Nov. 13, 2004
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    I really like that "dog on a haystack"!
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
    - Harry Dresden

    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn/aissance View Post
    I really like that "dog on a haystack"!
    The original saying is "dog in a manger." Believe you me, my momma used it early and often.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  19. #39
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    For "duh....," my father used
    "Is the Pope Catholic?"
    "Does a bear sh!t in the woods?"
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  20. #40
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Another cat-related term:

    Invisible Stripes. These are the fine, wavy variations in hair, usually seen on a cat's arms.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



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