The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 63
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,654

    Default

    Ok Experts:
    I love Chinese and anything with noodles and a sesame/ginger sauce. But I am a wuss mouth, and cannot deal with anything even half spicy. What besides Chinese should I try? I always look for Oriental food when traveling, as DH hates it.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com



  2. #42
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2000
    Posts
    4,699

    Default

    Thanks EVERYONE for the great ideas and the education.
    Charter member of the I-Refuse-to-Relinquish-My-Whip Clique



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Plumcreek View Post
    Ok Experts:
    I love Chinese and anything with noodles and a sesame/ginger sauce. But I am a wuss mouth, and cannot deal with anything even half spicy. What besides Chinese should I try? I always look for Oriental food when traveling, as DH hates it.
    You could try making your own! The base sauce that you use can be paired with veggies, rice, noodles, chicken, scrambled egg, etc...

    Allrecipes.com has some nice basic sauces. I don't always follow the recipes precisely because I generally know what I/my family like.

    I have a lovely electric wok that gets a LOT of use in my house. You can use it for more than just Asian foods. Super easy to clean as well.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,443

    Default

    I love it all! Thai, Korean, Chinese, Japanese and of course sushi. I can eat sashimi for days (I swear in a previous life I must have been some sort of sea creature!). My kids are the same - you should see people's faces as they order huge plates of sashimi and raw oysters (in other restaurants).



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Posts
    3,443

    Default

    Oh - and for mock Chinese on the cheap - get some sauce packets from your local store, frozen veggies and egg and Ramen noodles. Make ramen according to package directions but do not add seasoning packet. Put in a larger pan with the veggies, sauce packet contents, some water and an egg. Scramble around, and voila!



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,496

    Default

    Plumcreek:
    Peanut noodles are easy-peasy and you can make them as spicy or not as you like.
    Sauce:
    Creamy peanut butter mixed with enough soy sauce & rice wine vinegar to make the consistency you like. Experiment until you like what you get.
    Add red chili pepper flakes for heat

    Best if sauce is mixed with noodles and refrigerated overnight before adding in protein - chicken, tofu, shrimp - and fresh stuff: diced cucumber, cilantro (or flat leaf parsely if you don't like cilantro), thin-sliced green onions...
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
    Posts
    11,234

    Default

    I'm having Orange Chicken for lunch.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
    I'm having Orange Chicken for lunch.
    Making that for dinner. LOL Well, actually, I'm doing the BuddyRoo version, but the sauce will be orange/ginger/garlic. Quick and easy since I don't get off work til 8 or so.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,496

    Default

    And since Friday is my Buy Lunch day it looks like I'll be doing something Asian as well.
    Maybe even treat myself to the sushi bar for the unagi...even though it is 40F today and gray
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
    Posts
    11,234

    Default

    Well, the grocery store by your work has a great international food section if you want to be adventurous with the ingredients. I get all sorts of goodies there for cooking.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Here's my own favorite version of Peanut Noodles. You can tell that we like it uber-spicy, but the heat can easily be lowered or eliminated without a problem. Vegetarians can also enjoy this by just leaving out the chicken. It's still just as delicious.

    Bacardi1 Spicy Peanut Noodles with Chicken & Vegetables
    (adapted from “Eating Well” magazine)

    Makes between 2-4 servings depending on portion size. We usually end up with 2 dinner servings & a portion leftover for a lunch. This can be served either warm or chilled.

    1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts or tenders
    Approx. ½ cup smooth peanut butter
    Approx. 2 tablespoons soy sauce
    Approx. 2 tablespoons (or to taste) chili-garlic sauce (the Huy Fong “rooster” brand is the best)
    2-3 cloves garlic, peeled & minced or grated
    Approx. 1”-2” piece of fresh ginger, peeled & minced or grated
    ½ pound linguini (I use Rossi brand Asian-flavored linguini http://www.rossipasta.com/Asian-Nood...uini-P129.aspx , but regular linguini works just as well)
    Approx. 2 handfuls broccoli florets
    1-2 carrots, peeled & cut into batons
    Approx. 2 handfuls snow peas

    Fill pasta pot approx. 1/3 full of water & heat to a simmer. Add chicken breasts & poach for approx. 10 minutes. Add carrot batons & continue cooking for 5 minutes; add in broccoli florets & cook for another 3 minutes; add in snow peas & cook for 2 more minutes. Turn off heat & - reserving about a cup of the cooking liquid – drain in a colander & transfer chicken & vegetables to a plate or bowl. (Sometimes I save all of the cooking liquid to add to my dogs’ dinners. ) When cool enough to handle, shred chicken by hand into bite-size pieces.

    With no need to wash first, refill same pasta pot & cook pasta. When at the al dente stage, drain in colander.

    Meanwhile, in a bowl, using a metal whisk or a fork, thoroughly blend peanut butter, soy sauce, chili-garlic sauce, garlic, & ginger. If mixture seems too thick, stir in a little reserved chicken-vegetable cooking liquid to reach desired consistency.

    Transfer peanut sauce to empty pasta pot & fold in pasta, followed by chicken & vegetables. Continue gentle folding until ingredients are evenly coated with sauce. Serve.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    18,657

    Default

    Don't forget Indonesian and Malay and Filipino. I love Indonesian food. There were a couple of restaurants in New York back in 1980 that served wonderful food. I'll never forget taking a friend to one that specialized in Malaysian, Thai and Indonesian. She ordered Coconut Green Pepper soup and discovered that the green pepper that looked just like bell pepper was hot as H*ll. There was also a quite wonderful little place that did Japanese and was the first time I saw sushi being made behind the bar. It served a dish called oyako don that was spectacular. rice, chicken, broth, vegetables and a raw cracked egg on top. I've since learned that oyako don is Japanese nursery food, but this was far more sophisticated than oyako don at any other place that I've tried.

    Indonesian means rijstaffel and satay and some wonderful spring roll type things. I don't recall if Loempia is Indonesian or Filipino, but they are quite lovely when they aren't too greasy.

    Best chinese food I've ever eaten was at the Chinese pavilion at the Knoxville World's Fair.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2010
    Location
    yonder a bit, GA
    Posts
    3,410

    Default

    For northern Virginia, my favorite place was Tara Thai in Arlington I think? Man family used to go there all the time. Excellent pad Thai, satay chicken, cashew chicken, larb gai.... Yum.
    We went to Seattle/tacoma last summer to visit my grandma. When we went to Seattle one day my grandma's only request was Thai for lunch. We stumbled upon one restaurant and I don't remember the name but it was fabulous. I tried my first Thai iced tea and coffee there. It's now a favorite dessert of mine.
    I like pho alright but haven't tried much of it to really find out what it's like. I do get boba tea from the pho place in town.
    Taro is another flavor I just love. Love love love. Boba, froyo, never tried a taro roll but would love to. Usually when I get the boba tea it's a hard choice between Thai iced tea and taro.... Yum
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
    Posts
    11,234

    Default

    Tara Thai is still around. I went on a date there a few years ago. Twas nice. My sister had her bridal shower at Three Thai in Herndon, a hole in the wall, which had decent food.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,448

    Default

    I am eating lunch right now and this thread is still making me hungry!

    I love all Asian food, particulary love dim sum and Vietnamese. The French influence in Vietnamese food is particuarly wonderful. I think I could happily eat a Vietnamese "sub" every single day. Followed by Vietnamese coffee. Oh the joy, sitting there watching your coffee drip through the filter and then pouring it over a glass of ice and sweetened condensed milk. My idea of dessert heaven.

    If I am having people over for Asian food I usually serve beer with it, some sort of lighter tasting beer, maybe a wheat beer or something like that. I have friends who insist on serving wine whith Asian food (blech) but even they will make it a Riesling or Gewurtztraminer. I still think beer is the way to go.

    As for dessert, if I can I will make home made mango or coconut ice cream. If not, I still do something light and fruity like sorbet with almond cookies or somthing like that.

    However, if you space dinner and dessert far enough apart I still think you can serve just about anything for dessert and no one will complain!
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,654

    Default

    I do make my own version of oriental, by squirling away pieces of chicken or fish and broccholi, and mixing them with flat or ramen noodle packets, soy sauce, and sesame/ginger dressing/meat marinade. The chicken in peanut sauce frozen dinners are good on the run.

    What I would like to know is whether Thai or Vietmanese has generally less spicy dishes. I would love to branch out from Chinese, where I know what to avoid. The Pan Thai looks great, but I try and avoid things with chile or pepper named ingredients.

    What is spicy is often sneaky...
    I was never so suprised as at the QH Congress when the Jerk Chicken food booth guy told me to stop looking and try some. Not hot at all and really good. Versus a big dinner out in Santa Fe with Chicken and Mole' sauce - could not eat it.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,496

    Default

    Most Thai places that serve non-Asians code their menus so you can avoid spicy.

    Vietnamese is generally less spicy and more like the French cuisine it was influenced by during so many years of occupation.

    I ask waitstaff and tell them to me "hot" means it will make my nose run.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2010
    Location
    yonder a bit, GA
    Posts
    3,410

    Default

    Some places I've been ask for your rating of how spicy you want it. I would err on the cautious side
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)



  19. #59
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2001
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    3,247

    Default

    Love all Asian cuisine. Thai, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean, Chinese..... Best Chinese I had in China was when I asked our local driver to recommend a place and I'd pay for his meal. Delicious!!! Light and fresh.

    For desert we make mango and sweet sticky rice or serve Mochi. We do make delicious moon cakes (I realize they are the Chinese version of out fruitcakes and can be met with the same love/hate reaction)

    We have a Tara Thai here in Charlottesville but Monsoon is better (and gets better reviews from the Thai's we know)

    We have a PF Chang (which is not a Peter Chang and is really just a well marketed American invention) But our best Chinese is Taste of China

    I've yet to find a Vietnamese place with Pho as good as Pho Siagon in Fredericksburg.



  20. #60
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bits619 View Post
    Some places I've been ask for your rating of how spicy you want it. I would err on the cautious side
    Unless you DO like spicy food. Then go overboard & insist your food be extra-spicy. Most Asian restaurants tend to err on the side of caution when dealing with non-Asian customers.

    Luckily, the two places we frequent the most know us, & know that we definitely want our food Asian-spicy rather than American-spicy, so we no longer have to request it.

    Never be afraid to politely make your preference known in either direction.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Apr. 10, 2013, 07:16 AM
  2. Asian women ads on the right hand side!!!
    By Daventry in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: Feb. 13, 2013, 11:47 AM
  3. Asian women ads on the right hand side!!!!
    By Daventry in forum Help Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Feb. 11, 2013, 05:18 PM
  4. What are these huge mosquito-like things on the trail? Update: Asian Tiger Mosquitos
    By Vesper Sparrow in forum Endurance and Trail Riding
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Sep. 1, 2010, 07:02 AM
  5. Replies: 730
    Last Post: Jan. 5, 2006, 01:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness