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  1. #1
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    Default Emergency Preparedness?

    That is something I have been musing about for the better part of 20 years, but Monday's events kind of got the brain cells firing again.

    What do you have on hand for a bloody emergency?
    Without taking your shirt off (I mean I wear a sports bra that covers more than any bikini top I own, but it's still under wear)

    In Germany when I got my driver's license it was mandatory to carry a first aid kit in the car (along with a triangle to secure your emergency with, no flares though).
    And it was not one like you get off the shelf in most stores here: it actually contained wound dressings and gauze bandages, not just a handful of band aids that won't stick if you bleed a little heavier.

    I found this baby a couple of weeks ago:
    http://www.lifesecure.com/zuca.asp
    probably a little overkill for most days, but golly...it has everything!

    Now, being an adult volunteer now for both scouts, I am considering to suggest putting a small kit together to carry along most places.
    Containing, band aids, of course, some wound dressings, some bandages and some vet wrap, and of course some gloves.

    I have an under utilized food saver that could be pressed into service to vacuum pack the materials to water proof them (I which means I would have to include some sort of safety cutter in the kit)

    What am I forgetting?

    After all, the universal Scout motto is 'Be Prepared'

    (and I don't want ti to be a 40 pound gear bag...)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  2. #2
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    Default

    Did anyone watch the HBO documentary which was shown on CNN on Sunday (I think it was Sunday) about the mother who drove the wrong way on the Taconic Highway, killing 8 people (that includes her). Diane Schuler was the driver. I drive on the Taconic Highway. Her minivan burned.

    Got me to thinking about what I could carry in my car if I were to come up to an accident where the car was starting to burn.

    What would be appropriate? Is there a particular fire extinguisher? Some kind of fire blanket? I wouldn't attempt anything if the vehicle was engulfed, but if the fire was minor, I probably would try to help.



  3. #3
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    Default

    I think most experts suggest carrying a fire extinguisher in your car.
    I'm a bit skeptical about just how useful first-aid kits are- if it's really bad, your best bet is to call 911, and if it's actually something that can be handled by the kit, it can probably wait until the injured party gets home. If you have CPR skills and understand how to tourniquet/hold a bleeding artery, that would probably be more useful than a bunch of bandages and gauze. Unless you're venturing out into somewhere that ambulances can't reach and it will take a long time to hike out, in which case yes, you'll want a very good kit to bring along.



  4. #4
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    during driving class the instructor joked that car fire extinguishers were just big enough to put out a lighter But that could give you the seconds you need to pull somebody from the vehicle.

    I am thinking:
    Something to secure the scene of an accident (that has to be number one, since you have to secure yourself before you can help)

    gloves. Cheap and small. You can stuff a few in an old film container (if you still have any)

    something more than band aids (gauze pads, bandages)

    One of those emergency blankets, the shiney kind. they could be multi use I think. (reminds m of the camp out the Boy Scouts went on, coldest weekend of the year, it had rained, it was snowing....two guys got into the creek with their car and started swimming. the story is a bit longer, but one did not make it, the other was found by the leaders, naked except underwear and very cold!)

    Somebody suggested some rope etc, a bit more than I had anticipated. I suppose a flash light would be a must, and spare batteries.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    I think most experts suggest carrying a fire extinguisher in your car.
    I'm a bit skeptical about just how useful first-aid kits are- if it's really bad, your best bet is to call 911, and if it's actually something that can be handled by the kit, it can probably wait until the injured party gets home. If you have CPR skills and understand how to tourniquet/hold a bleeding artery, that would probably be more useful than a bunch of bandages and gauze. Unless you're venturing out into somewhere that ambulances can't reach and it will take a long time to hike out, in which case yes, you'll want a very good kit to bring along.
    the point is more to actually have something on hand to make a tourniquet.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  6. #6
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    oh, well, like many animal people I have quite a collection of spare leashes and lead ropes in my car. I could tourniquet up quite a lot of people. Or tie up a bad guy.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    oh, well, like many animal people I have quite a collection of spare leashes and lead ropes in my car. I could tourniquet up quite a lot of people. Or tie up a bad guy.
    lol, me too.



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    oh, well, like many animal people I have quite a collection of spare leashes and lead ropes in my car. I could tourniquet up quite a lot of people. Or tie up a bad guy.
    Duct tape is better for tying people up.

    We have a fire extinguisher in our truck, but I don't think we have one in the car. I was a ski patroller, and still have my loaded fanny pack with all sorts of interesting first aid devices. And please, don't use a tourniquet unless you know that person is going to die if you don't use it. A tourniquet means the loss of that limb. Direct pressure is much better.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post

    In Germany when I got my driver's license it was mandatory to carry a first aid kit in the car (along with a triangle to secure your emergency with, no flares though).
    And it was not one like you get off the shelf in most stores here: it actually contained wound dressings and gauze bandages, not just a handful of band aids that won't stick if you bleed a little heavier.

    I found this baby a couple of weeks ago:
    http://www.lifesecure.com/zuca.asp
    probably a little overkill for most days, but golly...it has everything!
    I have still have one of those (from when I lived in Germany).

    If I was volunteering with kids I'd want to be bringing something like children's benadryl. Actually, I'd ascertain which kid had allergies or a health condition and make sure the kid had his stuff with him, including an epi-pen.

    Kids probably won't suffer grave injuries; but they will get things like stings, poison ivy, heat exhaustion, dehydration, and minor strains and sprains. There are some nice products like the clot stop and chemical ice packs you can buy that store very well in sealed packages. Glucose tablets, the children's chewable benadryl - stuff like that comes in sealed blister packs so you don't need to do the extra work to seal them. One package of each should be enough - boy scouts generally do not suffer mass casualties (poison ivy excepted)

    I'd get certified in advanced first-aid.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    somebody suggested ID and money - cash, you know, that moldy paper...as well as a CC as well. Even a copy of the health insurance!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    I have still have one of those (from when I lived in Germany).

    If I was volunteering with kids I'd want to be bringing something like children's benadryl. Actually, I'd ascertain which kid had allergies or a health condition and make sure the kid had his stuff with him, including an epi-pen.

    Kids probably won't suffer grave injuries; but they will get things like stings, poison ivy, heat exhaustion, dehydration, and minor strains and sprains. There are some nice products like the clot stop and chemical ice packs you can buy that store very well in sealed packages. Glucose tablets, the children's chewable benadryl - stuff like that comes in sealed blister packs so you don't need to do the extra work to seal them. One package of each should be enough - boy scouts generally do not suffer mass casualties (poison ivy excepted)

    I'd get certified in advanced first-aid.
    The leaders are well trained and the boys had their first aid training just a short while ago, so that does not worry me too much (our Scout Master has been to 'The Sand Box' so he has some combat first aid training) It's just that we won't be at a location with amenities and the kit has been stripped of old junk and we have opted to not replace most items other than on a needed basis (like perishables), but we don't have much in terms of bandages and such.
    Mass casualties, no, we don't expect that. but a good face plant can exceed the capabilities of a small first aid pack: The Kid skimmed hi need one day, an area about the size of my palm, and there was not even a small band aid in the kit

    good reminder though to ger the suer large hand sanitizer though: I have been told it works wonders as Poison Ivy first aid!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    the point is more to actually have something on hand to make a tourniquet.
    In EMT class we were told to definitely not encourage tourniquet use by lay people, that more limbs were lost/damaged because of bystanders rushing to belt wounds and causing irreversible damage by limiting blood flow. Direct pressure, direct pressure, direct pressure. No tourniquets. People apply them when not needed, apply them way too tightly, and don't ease them/reapply them properly almost all the time.

    Obviously the Boston bombings were a case where tourniquets were needed but advanced medical help was right there. Generally speaking they do more harm than good when applied by non-trained personnel.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    I did take advanced first aid but it's been thirty years. We had nitrile gloves and the little facemasks for rescue breathing, or alternatively you can use heavy saran wrap. Wire mesh about 18" long and 6 " wide for splints and sports tape, regular gauze, lots of that. You don't need the stuff so much as you need to know what to do like the ABC's, doing a full body evaluation, checking the pupils, looking for bleeding from the ears and nose (for TBI) knowing where the radial artery is, the femoral artery and also knowing that bit about the tourniquet vs pressure. Often your victim presents with numerous injuries and you have to determine which are immediately life threatening, some can be obvious and some can be obscured by clothing or the victim's position ( I recall learning prone and supine in that class) or be internal but just as deadly.
    You can buy First Aid books from the American Red Cross with lists of what you need and lots of Fire Depts and Community Colleges sponsor the classes. Some workplaces too. And don't forget that the methods are often the same for animals, for bleeding wounds etc..

    ETA for your herd of Boy Scouts there are medical supply houses that sell 4x4 bandages and fingertips and knuckles by the gross, just keep them locked up because kids (at least mine) will use up a band aid for any minor abrasions and they'll run through them quick!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joanne View Post
    Did anyone watch the HBO documentary which was shown on CNN on Sunday (I think it was Sunday) about the mother who drove the wrong way on the Taconic Highway, killing 8 people (that includes her). Diane Schuler was the driver. I drive on the Taconic Highway. Her minivan burned.

    Got me to thinking about what I could carry in my car if I were to come up to an accident where the car was starting to burn.

    What would be appropriate? Is there a particular fire extinguisher? Some kind of fire blanket? I wouldn't attempt anything if the vehicle was engulfed, but if the fire was minor, I probably would try to help.
    You want an extinguisher rated for all fires. I always carry one ever since a really horrible bus fire that happened in Alaska a few decades ago. The driver's leg was trapped as the engine was burning and people were trying to get him out. He was begging for help but the fire became too hot for the rescuers. The tragic story was so haunting that I got a fire extinguisher and have kept one ever since. If ten cars had had fire extinguishers (because there was a line of vehicles in both directions stopped by the accident), maybe they could have slowed that fire long enough to get that man out of the bus.



  15. #15
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    What a horrible scenario. I am definitely putting a fire extinguisher in my car now.

    I have also been procrastinating making a bug-out bag (I have a very little one already in the car). Lesson learned from the West, Texas, disaster last night. I live in a community where houses are very close together (Florida). I've been told by EMTs that we are a high risk community because of the closeness in case there is a fire. First sign of anything amiss, cat and myself are out of here until safe.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Here is a list. What am I missing?


    In a separate baggie so that it can be removed easily and refreshed:
    -Neosporin
    -Benadryl
    -Aspirin?

    The rest:
    -Small amount of candy or a few little packages of sugar*
    -Square gauze bandages**
    -Bandaids
    -medical tape
    -Sanitary hand wash
    -Sterile water, enough for drinking and wound washing, so maybe two water bottles?
    -Scissors
    -Knife
    -Tweezers
    -Needle (wide enough eye for thread or dental floss)
    -Thread
    -Dental floss
    -Duct tape
    -Twine or rope
    -Fire extinquisher
    -Flash light
    -Road flares or Emergency Triangles
    -Reflective foil blanket
    -Regular blanket, size depending on available space. It might be good to have a roomy jacket instead of, or in addition to a blanket, for a person who has their clothes very damaged, bloodied, or torn off in an accident.

    * for diabetic emergencies
    ** I've heard sanitary napkins are good too. Tell those Boy Scouts if Dirty Harry could do it, so can you. Double-duty use if traveling with girls. After using so many diapers on hoof abscesses and seeing how useful they are, I might want to include a couple.

    If you live in cold places:
    sleeping bag instead of a blanket
    socks
    gloves or mittens
    very warm hat
    unfrozen water

    In hot places:
    Sun screen
    Hat
    Extra water for drinking and filling overheated radiator



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne FS View Post
    In EMT class we were told to definitely not encourage tourniquet use by lay people, that more limbs were lost/damaged because of bystanders rushing to belt wounds and causing irreversible damage by limiting blood flow. Direct pressure, direct pressure, direct pressure. No tourniquets. People apply them when not needed, apply them way too tightly, and don't ease them/reapply them properly almost all the time.

    Obviously the Boston bombings were a case where tourniquets were needed but advanced medical help was right there. Generally speaking they do more harm than good when applied by non-trained personnel.
    They aren't teaching that anymore. They found that you can go several hours with a tourniquet on and not lose the limb. There needs to be pretty significant bleeding to warrant it's use however and I agree that most of the time pressure is more than enough. If you do use a tourniquet, resist the urge to take it off to see if they are still bleeding. Note the time you applied it as well.



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