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  1. #41
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    MaybeMorgan, since what I'd really like to say to you would too-badly shock those who know me a helluva lot better than you do, I'll just stick with:

    Well bless your little judgmental heart




    Simkie, I think I actually do have some Ace, though it's probably well-expired.

    I will be calling my SAV in the morning and asking. Unless it's something outrageous (for a chicken) I'm going to do that.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    4 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    Hey - I doubt you'll be the first to call your SAV about this.

    Long, long ago - when dinosaurs roamed the earth, & there were no "avian" vets around - I took a huge rooster of mine to my SAV. Even though I had to suffer thru a lot of chuckles in the waiting room, my vet diagnosed "gout" (a rooster with gout, can you believe it??), & said rooster had to be separated from the rest of the flock & put on a "less rich diet" - lol!!! He was a family pet, so the separation wasn't a big deal, but my mother was rather upset that he could no longer enjoy the leftovers from her wonderful cooking.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Good Lord people - why hasn't someone piped up & suggested she run over it with her car?????
    That's what my local shelter suggested for a very annoying male feral cat. I'm not kidding.

    OP, I hope your vet is able to PTS your chicken. I've stomped mice and rabbits (with a shovel) that I've taken away from the barn cat when she plays with them too long. Even I would have a hard time with a chicken with a name.

    And for the more judgmental of you....pffft.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    I gave a cat that had been hit by a car and was mortally injured a huge dose of IM ace and it eventually became so lethargic that I was able to suffocate it (no vet was willing to come--this was almost 20 years ago) but it took quite a long time.

    As CO2 is considered standard procedure by a number of veterinary experts, I don't feel it's worth getting all shrieky and hysterical over. I was happy to dredge it out of my memory, in fact--those of us (myself included) who had a hard time twirling lab mice and snapping their necks one-handed, which was what our professor did, used a CO2 cage sometimes, when the method didn't interfere with the studies we were doing. I had completely forgotten about it after 25+ years.
    Click here before you buy.



  5. #45
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Hey - I doubt you'll be the first to call your SAV about this.
    Oh, I know I won't LOL There have been others right here who said they've taken chickens in to their SAV (and some meanies made fun of them for taking the "easy" way out )


    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    OP, I hope your vet is able to PTS your chicken. I've stomped mice and rabbits (with a shovel) that I've taken away from the barn cat when she plays with them too long. Even I would have a hard time with a chicken with a name.

    And for the more judgmental of you....pffft.
    I know she'll do it - just a matter of how much, though I have a feeling it won't be anything to get all hyper about.

    Last Summer I crunched a frog with the arena drag, though he was still alive. I figured the quickest ending to him would be to stomp him. That was a really, really bad mistake on my part - while it did end him quickly, it took me DAYS to get over the sound and the crunch. The next 2 frogs I maimed were given to the chickens who *quickly and happily* dispensed of them.

    This girl's name is Ella She has a "twin" sister named Bella. Both are New Hampshire Reds. They used to be inseparable
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #46
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    ACE is not recommended for cats, they have painful weird ocular pressure increase side effects and it is not good, best I remember from a vet story long ago.



  7. #47
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    May. 5, 2009
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    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Lol! Although this is NOT a laughing matter, thanks for pointing out to me that someone actually DID have this idiotic advice. COTH posters come from all points & always seem to find a way to astound, dismay, & stymy.
    Post #21 made me throw up a little.... " I can't wring your neck, but lay here quietly while I RUN YOU OVER WITH MY CAR..."

    (my took cousin took her guinea pig to vet to have it spayed or something bizzarre like that so they've seen it all)
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  8. #48
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    Oct. 13, 2011
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    Central Va.
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    Sorry to hear about Ella.
    As a long time keeper of chickens with names, I know how easy it is to get attached. They are lovely creatures.

    Starvation isn't the worse way to go. If she's peaceful in her accustomed place and you can't have her put to sleep or wring her neck, then let her be. Let her peacefully fade away, stress free from the hands on approach.
    I've known many fine chickens, have had deaths over the years ( from old age, euthanasia, predators), and I'm okay with the "comfortable fade" in a comfortable setting.
    But that's just me.



  9. #49
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    I'm not so sure "slow starvation" is a "comfortable fade". Although I'm obviously not an expert of the "chicken world", I'm thinking that "slow starvation" is also accompanied by fear from flock predation (& regular predation), along with everything else a prey animal considers when it becomes unable to protect itself. A chicken doesn't automatically realize that it's in a protected coop, etc.



  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    ACE is not recommended for cats, they have painful weird ocular pressure increase side effects and it is not good, best I remember from a vet story long ago.
    This cat was dying--its entire hind end was crushed--and it's what I had on hand.
    Click here before you buy.



  11. #51
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Christ Almighty!!! PLEASE don't listen to the neck-snapping, locking-in-a-container-with-dry-ice (JESUS!!!) folks.
    Uhh... "locking it in a container" with CO2 (the gas produced by dry ice) is by far and away the most popular way to euthanize lab animals, and chickens can definitely fall in that category. It is one of the most humane methods out there, as determined by multitudes of vets all over the country. So is "snapping necks" (cervical dislocation), which is usually option #2.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    Uhh... "locking it in a container" with CO2 (the gas produced by dry ice) is by far and away the most popular way to euthanize lab animals, and chickens can definitely fall in that category. It is one of the most humane methods out there, as determined by multitudes of vets all over the country. So is "snapping necks" (cervical dislocation), which is usually option #2.
    Dear- cervical dislocation of lab animals is extremely different than wringing a chicken's neck and requires training to be done humanely. Plus- it is only " standard" in small rodents and not even common in rats. I have 20 years experience in the industry with this one, including serving on IACUCs at 2 major pharm companies. You can't compare it to chickens.

    CO2 from regulated tanks is different from a layman as far as experience, having to use dry ice as a replacement. It's traumatic enough it's her pet.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  13. #53
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    I love all you guys who get it

    I found (another) beheaded skink in the garage tonight, so I took that to her and she went right at that little guy Not a bad (potentially) last meal
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #54
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    Jun. 15, 2007
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    Sorry to disappear. I got the dry ice at my local grocery store.

    The chick did not fight it much. Once he was down, I did see him struggle momentarily then was gone. I left the lid on for another few seconds to make certain and that was it.

    I once tried to wring the neck of a hen that was attacked and badly injured. I tried several times and really could not seem to do it correctly. Wish I had thought of the dry ice then. It would have been less traumatic for both of us.

    Allowing her to slowly starve to death would be cruel.



  15. #55
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    JB, have you got a .22 and how good a shot are you?
    Click here before you buy.



  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I love all you guys who get it

    I found (another) beheaded skink in the garage tonight, so I took that to her and she went right at that little guy Not a bad (potentially) last meal
    Yeah she ate it! That would give me some comfort. Raising my glass to Ella and company that morning comes quickly. Hope you can get her to a vet with minimal angst for both of you. Be it horse, dog , rat- it's never easy when it's your pet.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  17. #57
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    This cat was dying--its entire hind end was crushed--and it's what I had on hand.
    My comment was so others don't try using ACE on a cat without direct instruction from their vet first.
    In a pinch, you got to do what you got to do and keep trying until something works.



  18. #58
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    DW - 9mm and .38. I'm sure at point blank range I'm a pretty good shot LOL However, she still fights quite a lot when picked up, so "thrashing point blank range", probably not so good

    Penny yes that gives me comfort
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    I love all you guys who get it

    I found (another) beheaded skink in the garage tonight, so I took that to her and she went right at that little guy Not a bad (potentially) last meal
    So she's actively eating? Now I'm confused. What's the rush to knock her off?



  20. #60
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    Oct. 25, 2007
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    I have had a fair share of chickens humanely euthanized by the sav.

    I was never snickered at, nor did I feel wierd bringing in a chicken to be euth'd.

    Good luck, and Godspeed to miss Ella. It is never easy.

    Personally, the more death I experience, the harder it hits me. For the poster who feels, we should be able to dispatch our animals reminds me of people who get judge mental about pulling the plug on a terminally ill person...until you are in that position, you do not know how you will respond, so shut up. There, I said it, although, bless your heart is a much better way of saying fu, in southern style
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld



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