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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    35,218

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    So she's actively eating? Now I'm confused. What's the rush to knock her off?
    Valid question, and I obviously hadn't given the whole story. I do think I mentioned in the OP that it's a suspected fractured back though

    It started a few weeks ago with her looking a bit uncoordinated. She was out with the flock doing all things chicken, but the big a-hole teenage 'roo seemed to be picking on her and really getting rough with her - he's twice her size. We thought at first maybe she'd run into a fence or something trying to get away and had perhaps injured a leg or wing or something. After a few days, she wasn't getting better, and he was on her (literally) more times than we liked, so we put her in the little coop to hopefully recover. That will be 3 weeks ago on Thursday.

    The first few days she got worse. Then she seemed to get better and I'd let her out to "run around" for a few minutes after the rest of the gang went on their way. But "running around" was literal - she mostly walked and ran in circles, and if she ran too fast, she'd face plant. So, we stopped that and just let her walk in circles in the coop.

    Soon she began falling over and had trouble getting up, but would stay up once we righted her.

    Now, she really can't even stay upright without being propped up In the last day it's degraded to the point if she does move she ends up at the other end of the coop (which is all of about 3' long) away from food and water, which we've set beside her.

    She's so thin

    Until this morning her appetite has been really good, but just getting enough has been a problem. This morning, when she didn't go bonkers over her banana, I knew things were bad enough

    So that's the story.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,405

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    Try Animal Control. They will usually euthanize most anything for a donation. (Assuming they use injection of course). I had to put down a few but I worked at a lab and could get chloroform. It knocked them out fairly quickly (although they do thump around a bit because it burns the nasal passages and eyes) and then you just leave it sealed up for a few hours to be sure they die from lack of oxygen. CO2 would work also I guess.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2012
    Posts
    918

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    I don't know how to say this right.

    I think it's awesome that you can't just snap her neck or whatever and that she has meaning to you. There are a lot of people out there who would have done something awful to her just because she's a chicken and not a dog or cat.

    Good luck with whatever you decide. I'd probably go overboard and would end up with X-rays and stuff.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2000
    Posts
    1,068

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    Aw, New Hampshire Reds are one of my favorite breeds.
    I'm glad that my rooster is pretty gentle and doesnt single anybody out.
    I dont feel bad about not being able to kill an animal. I actually like that quality in myself and my husband.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    Scranton, PA
    Posts
    708

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    I have PTS several of our chickens with my
    .45 (overkill I know but it's what was on hand.)
    If she can't stand up without being propped up as you said, one shot is the easiest way (and very humane) to end her life.

    I know you said you do not want to do hands on but there is a more humane way to cut their heads off than just cut their head off. It involves a good deal of relaxing them and then a slit in their throat. You hold them and they don't trash around, it's all over very quickly.

    Either way, hugs to you, I know ending a life is not easy, whether it be a mouse, a chicken, or a dog. I butcher 50-75 meat chickens every day and it is always a solemn day for me. I don't enjoy the process, but we do what we need to so to provide for ourselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    4,533

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    JB I trust your judgement and I understand what you want to do and what you don't want to do.

    In your shoes, I would find someone that was ok with chopping her head off. Say goodbye and hand her off.

    Bacardi I see your spots haven't changed.



  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Valid question, and I obviously hadn't given the whole story. I do think I mentioned in the OP that it's a suspected fractured back though

    It started a few weeks ago with her looking a bit uncoordinated. She was out with the flock doing all things chicken, but the big a-hole teenage 'roo seemed to be picking on her and really getting rough with her - he's twice her size. We thought at first maybe she'd run into a fence or something trying to get away and had perhaps injured a leg or wing or something. After a few days, she wasn't getting better, and he was on her (literally) more times than we liked, so we put her in the little coop to hopefully recover. That will be 3 weeks ago on Thursday.

    The first few days she got worse. Then she seemed to get better and I'd let her out to "run around" for a few minutes after the rest of the gang went on their way. But "running around" was literal - she mostly walked and ran in circles, and if she ran too fast, she'd face plant. So, we stopped that and just let her walk in circles in the coop.

    Soon she began falling over and had trouble getting up, but would stay up once we righted her.

    Now, she really can't even stay upright without being propped up In the last day it's degraded to the point if she does move she ends up at the other end of the coop (which is all of about 3' long) away from food and water, which we've set beside her.

    She's so thin

    Until this morning her appetite has been really good, but just getting enough has been a problem. This morning, when she didn't go bonkers over her banana, I knew things were bad enough

    So that's the story.
    I'm so sorry to hear this, JB. I don't have anything helpful to post, since I've never had chickens (although I've always wanted them). I just wanted to offer my condolences for what they're worth.



  8. #68
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Valid question, and I obviously hadn't given the whole story. I do think I mentioned in the OP that it's a suspected fractured back though

    It started a few weeks ago with her looking a bit uncoordinated. She was out with the flock doing all things chicken, but the big a-hole teenage 'roo seemed to be picking on her and really getting rough with her - he's twice her size. We thought at first maybe she'd run into a fence or something trying to get away and had perhaps injured a leg or wing or something. After a few days, she wasn't getting better, and he was on her (literally) more times than we liked, so we put her in the little coop to hopefully recover. That will be 3 weeks ago on Thursday.

    The first few days she got worse. Then she seemed to get better and I'd let her out to "run around" for a few minutes after the rest of the gang went on their way. But "running around" was literal - she mostly walked and ran in circles, and if she ran too fast, she'd face plant. So, we stopped that and just let her walk in circles in the coop.

    Soon she began falling over and had trouble getting up, but would stay up once we righted her.

    Now, she really can't even stay upright without being propped up In the last day it's degraded to the point if she does move she ends up at the other end of the coop (which is all of about 3' long) away from food and water, which we've set beside her.

    She's so thin

    Until this morning her appetite has been really good, but just getting enough has been a problem. This morning, when she didn't go bonkers over her banana, I knew things were bad enough

    So that's the story.
    Ugh. That's terrible. I wonder if it's something neurological. I don't remember the specifics, but there are a couple of things poultry can get that have neurological effects. Unfortunately, I don't believe they were curable, & having her humanely euthanized is probably your best bet.



  9. #69
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2001
    Location
    Almost Aiken
    Posts
    2,517

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    I get it. And I couldn't do it

    The problem with taking an animal's death into your own hands - literally- is that you need to be REALLY committed to it, and have no hesitation about doing it. If you start to snap a neck for instance, and have a microsecond's omg-I-can't-do-this moment, you are going to flub it and cause the poor thing more pain and trauma. Even with a firearm, you need to be a good shot, a confident shot, and not quaver as you pull the trigger or agin it's going to get worse not better.

    My vote is for vet advice at the very least, and probably vet assistance.



  10. #70
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,229

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    Hope the vet is able to get you in early.



  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,450

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    We quit having chickens when Grandma, in her 90's, was not going to be able to ring necks any more, as none of us wanted to do it, sorry, not unless an emergency.

    Our neighbor was more than glad to get them and make chicken soup out of the then older layers.

    Some people in some situations can do the neck wringing just fine, some can't and that is fine, each one of us has to find our comfort zone with all we do in life, the good and the unhappy deeds, like killing the chickens you cared for for some years.

    I hope that, not finding anyone else at hand, your vet will help you, one way or another.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    9,934

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    I"ve been following this and rooting for the chicken. I'm sorry she hasn't been able to get well and bless you for giving her every chance. ((Hugs))



  13. #73
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,148

    Default I'm sorry ~ Jingles your vet helps quickly today ~

    I'm sorry ~

    I hope your vet can 'help' Ella today ~

    ((hugs)) for Ella's family barnyard & house ~

    God Speed ~ sweet girl ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  14. #74
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    8,673

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Judge not, lest ye be judged. Walk a mile in somebody else's shoes in ALL situations that have to do with death, dying, misery and suffering and then you can choose to tell them that the way they're handling it is wrong.
    ^
    THISX10!

    JB:
    So sorry your hen is not going to recover.
    {hugs} from anotehr chickenlover.

    I can hardly bring myself to dispatch the bunnies/mice/etc my barncats half-kill then bring in to play with.
    And those are IMO just vermin.
    For them a metal shovel blade to the head is fast & relatively quick.
    I could not, however, do that to any pet of mine.

    Would your SAV provide you with a lethal injection?
    Surely a dose small enough for a chicken could be given to you w/o any legal hassle.
    Last edited by 2DogsFarm; Apr. 17, 2013 at 10:39 AM.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  15. #75
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    874

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    Any updates on Ella?

    I hope you can find some help and answers that fit what Ella needs and what you need in this situation.



  16. #76
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,218

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    She's gone

    My regular SAV really didn't feel comfortable being able to to right by Ella, but she sent me to another vet just a bit further down the road, where a fairly recent addition to their staff has a lot of avian experience. It cost more than my vet would have, but that's understandable, and it was still well worth my peace of mind. She used gas first to put her under, then injected. She said she went very quickly, faster than she thought she would, which further confirms this was the right thing.

    We talked about possibilities, including Mareck's which she agreed couldn't be ruled out. It's been 4-ish weeks since we first noticed something off about Ella, 3 weeks tomorrow that she'd been in her own little coop, so I'm hopeful if it WAS Mareck's, the fact that everyone else is happy and normal as can be is a good sign. She also said it very well could have been trauma, given what I described, including having seen her run fairly hard into a fence to get away from Mr Roo, and including the fact that we recently had 2 hens disappear (did find a pile of feathers from one, nothing from the other) and we're highly, highly suspicious of a neighbor's dog which means they might have had a non-lethal encounter, though we didn't find any external sign of anything.

    So, she's gone, waiting in the cat carrier for me to bury her (deep) later.

    I'm so sad she's gone, she was a darling little girl and it was just so fun and funny to see her and her bigger sister Bella looking like they were tied at the hip wandering around all day Bella is one we usually have to take off the top of the coop and stick her in at night, and last night she perched on top of Ella's coop instead :|

    But, such is farm and animal life, I know, I just deal and move on.

    I'm trying to make myself feel a little better knowing that losing these 3 means I have a valid excuse to get some more, and hopefully get some breeds I would really like, now that I've learned more about some.

    So, anyone in the Greensboro area have pullets?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  17. #77
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    8,803

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    Sorry JB. I had to teach myself to get more hard hearted after our plymouth rocks got picked off one by one. They had names and would come for oatmeal breakfasts. Now they are all just white, not friendly or tame because those were the first ones picked off, and maybe I'll be able to get DH to put up a decent fenced run for their safety and start fresh.

    Good luck with some interesting breeds!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  18. #78
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,312

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    Aww, RIP little chickaletta.
    Click here before you buy.



  19. #79
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,218

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    I'll be avoiding white - white Mary, an EE, is one of the ones who went missing and whose pile of feathers I found My friend calls the white ones "hawk bait" but I think the simple fact is they are just more visible to all predators. Oddly enough our first missing girl was our biggest, and black - she was really cool, and Australorp mix, frequently laid double-yolk eggs including her next to last one before she disappeared, this monstrosity. For reference, the next biggest is the size of a store x-large LOL
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  20. #80
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,224

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    You can get dry ice at our supermarket, and I'm happy to learn of this "trick" because if my damn hens keep flying over their 7-foot-high enclosure I'm going to dispatch them and get new, fat ones that don't fly at all!
    Remedy for this...clip the long feathers on ONE wing. They can flap, but not fly!!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



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