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  1. #1
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Default Spinoff: Grain feeders- How many quarts of grain do you give your horse per day?

    How many quarts of grain do you give your horse per day?

    Please include sex/age/breed and activity level.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Round Hill, VA
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    By grain do you mean that in the general concentrate feed type way (as in, any type of concentrate, grain based or otherwise) or do you specifically GRAIN (as in something that is oat, corn, or barley based)?

    My horse eats 9qts of "grain" a day (Fibergized Omega, which is actually beet pulp based). 1 quart = 1lb. This is split into three meals.

    He is a 9yo TB gelding that should be competing at preliminary level eventing this year (works 6 days a week, and fairly hard with intense dressage and jumping sessions usually weekly and a gallop day). He is a massive calorie furnace even when not at his peak amount of work, so needs a lot of input for his output.


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    By grain do you mean that in the general concentrate feed type way (as in, any type of concentrate, grain based or otherwise) or do you specifically GRAIN (as in something that is oat, corn, or barley based)?

    My horse eats 9qts of "grain" a day (Fibergized Omega, which is actually beet pulp based). 1 quart = 1lb. This is split into three meals.

    He is a 9yo TB gelding that should be competing at preliminary level eventing this year (works 6 days a week, and fairly hard with intense dressage and jumping sessions usually weekly and a gallop day). He is a massive calorie furnace even when not at his peak amount of work, so needs a lot of input for his output.
    I was originally referring to actual grain, but I'm interested in concentrated feeds as well. Thanks!



  4. #4
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    I have one horse on GRAIN-a three year old who gets about a quart and a half of a dry (no molasses) cob mix. She has a history of choke, so I prefer to not feed her anything pelleted or extruded. She gets a small amount of grain to get her tri-amino and msm and to keep her happy while the other horses eat. She's doing nothing but growing right now.

    I also have two on Triple Crown Complete. One 6 yo TB mare in full work who gets about 8 quarts/day. The other is 15 yo, retired and gets about a quart.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2009
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    11 yr old Oldenburg, mare, working her way back to 4th/PSG gets probably two pounds TOTAL over 3 feedings/day. Low fat performance feed. She wants to be a FAT horse... This will increase a bit in another month or so as the work load gets back to where she was.
    23 yr old big TB ridden walk/trot/canter every other day, roughly 30 minutes gets that same two pounds PER MEAL, or about 6 lbs or so, Senior feed. Plus oil. He tends to the thin side.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  6. #6
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    Mar. 4, 2004
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    Louisville, KY
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    You need to measure in pounds, not quarts. A quart of oats is not going to weigh the same as a quart of corn or a quart of pelleted feed. And they're each going to have totally different calorie amounts as well. Look online or on your feed tags...the calories will be given by the pound.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01


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  7. #7
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedMare01 View Post
    You need to measure in pounds, not quarts. A quart of oats is not going to weigh the same as a quart of corn or a quart of pelleted feed. And they're each going to have totally different calorie amounts as well. Look online or on your feed tags...the calories will be given by the pound.
    That would make sense! As you can tell, I'm very new to figuring out what to feed my horse. He does fine on what he was eating when I bought him (I see it measured in quarts at my barn haha), but I'm trying to get some sense of context as I change his diet for his increasing work load.



  8. #8
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    Mar. 4, 2004
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    Louisville, KY
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    Tell us about your guy and we can help out with ideas, if you'd like.

    What is he eating now, and what is his workload? How is his weight? Skinny, fat, just right? Is he maintaing or losing weight? Does he have access to plenty of hay or pasture?

    Also, your general location (state) will help out with recommendations. Certain feeds are only available in certain areas.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  9. #9
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by lferguson View Post
    That would make sense! As you can tell, I'm very new to figuring out what to feed my horse. He does fine on what he was eating when I bought him (I see it measured in quarts at my barn haha), but I'm trying to get some sense of context as I change his diet for his increasing work load.
    This is just so dependant on the individual horse... its a little tough to pose a question like your op and really extrapolate to your own horse without a LOT more info. It's not like there's some straight line formula where you can input age and workload and breed and get the amount of grain ;-)

    If you're not sure what to feed your horse, your absolute best bet is to talk with your trainer or barn owner or mentor (someone you trust who knows your horse) about the issues you're having and your goals.

    If you're going to get that sort of advice here, more info is required to understand the issues and provide some feedback... starting with what he's eating now (hay, grain, supplements), why you're not happy with it and what your horse is doing.

    Depending on what you're looking at, he might not need more hard feed. He might need a fat supplement, or more protein, or more/different hay...

    And quarts vs poundage....best to understand both! I guarantee you that your average barn owner will just give you a blank stare if you ask you horse to be fed x pounds of grain, especially if you are providing the grain versus the barn having their own options.



  10. #10
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    Dec. 5, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    This is just so dependant on the individual horse... its a little tough to pose a question like your op and really extrapolate to your own horse without a LOT more info. It's not like there's some straight line formula where you can input age and workload and breed and get the amount of grain ;-)

    If you're not sure what to feed your horse, your absolute best bet is to talk with your trainer or barn owner or mentor (someone you trust who knows your horse) about the issues you're having and your goals.

    If you're going to get that sort of advice here, more info is required to understand the issues and provide some feedback... starting with what he's eating now (hay, grain, supplements), why you're not happy with it and what your horse is doing.

    Depending on what you're looking at, he might not need more hard feed. He might need a fat supplement, or more protein, or more/different hay...

    And quarts vs poundage....best to understand both! I guarantee you that your average barn owner will just give you a blank stare if you ask you horse to be fed x pounds of grain, especially if you are providing the grain versus the barn having their own options.
    I'm actually not even necessarily looking for suggestions here. I just have no sense of context as I've only leased before this, so this is quite helpful to see what might be "normal" for some horses. I definitely plan on speaking to my vet before switching up his diet!

    Thank you for your input!


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  11. #11
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    May. 5, 2009
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    Sure to get kicked out of the Bible Belt soon.....
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    Take a plastic Baggie (a big one) to the barn. Put in a quart, seal ( this is important), go to local grocery store to veggie aisle, while Aunt Ethyl is squeezing the melons, put Baggie on veggie scale. Poof, you have how much 1 quart of your grain weighs.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  12. #12
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Round Hill, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedMare01 View Post
    You need to measure in pounds, not quarts. A quart of oats is not going to weigh the same as a quart of corn or a quart of pelleted feed. And they're each going to have totally different calorie amounts as well. Look online or on your feed tags...the calories will be given by the pound.
    Yep. Why I specified my 1 quart weighs 1 lb. While my feed chart is written in "scoops" for ease of translation, I know how much a scoop weighs. I also have a basic idea of how many lbs of hay I feed (not exact, but I have a rough idea of what 10 or 15 or 20lbs feels like) and why, when you walk down my barn aisle on a couple of different days, one horse may have 3 flakes one day and 4 the next).

    Feed by weight, not by volume. The very first rule to feeding equines.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    13 y/o 16H chunky Irish x TB mare, lower level eventing and dressage: 1 pound ration balancer AM and PM. Normally she gets 1/2 pound but we are putting a few pounds on her for breeding. I went a little overboard getting her lean this winter.

    8 y/o pinto 15.3 medium build gelding, Training level eventing: just changed him from 1 pound ration balancer AM and PM to 2 pounds of a "lite" feed because we are suspecting a sensitivity to alfalfa and this product doesn't have any in it.

    Shetland pony mare gets a scant handful.

    Recent boarder, a 16.3 TB on stall rest was getting 2 pounds of Purina's Horseman's Edge 12% AM and PM and one pound Amplify AM and PM.

    Keebler (15.1 h small bodied Appy/WB gelding, age 10) used to get 1/2 pound ration balancer AM and PM when he was with me.

    Sorry, I don't do "quarts". It's not a problem if you know what YOUR quart weights, but different feeds have different mass-per-volume and I find it's just easier to do pounds, and I have horses at home as well as boarding and take new ones in and out often enough that I have several feed products floating around sometimes and going by weight is just easier for me.
    Click here before you buy.



  14. #14
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    ...
    Shetland pony mare gets a scant handful....
    And how much does this weight in pounds?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  15. #15
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    20 y.o. Arabian mare, basically not being worked, sometimes a trail ride in the summer: 1 lb daily of TC 30% ration balancer, 1 cup of flax, 1 lb of shredded beet pulp wet down so the flax will stick to it.

    6 y.o. QH gelding, my main riding horse, trail ridden and schooled in the ring twice a week: 1 lb daily of TC 30% ration balancer, 1 cup of flax, 1/2 lb alfalfa cubes which take him longer to eat, and my mare can eat in peace without me having to babysit them This is the only reason he gets them.


    They both have unlimited hay in the winter, and 24/7 ample grass pasture turnout in the summer.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  16. #16
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    Mar. 23, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pennywell Bay View Post
    Take a plastic Baggie (a big one) to the barn. Put in a quart, seal ( this is important), go to local grocery store to veggie aisle, while Aunt Ethyl is squeezing the melons, put Baggie on veggie scale. Poof, you have how much 1 quart of your grain weighs.
    That's clever!



  17. #17
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    Or, just get one of these $5.00 hanging scales at Walmart, hang a bucket from it, zero the scale, and add grain to see what the grain weighs.

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Berkley-Sc...-Tape/16637411
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  18. #18
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    Or, just get one of these $5.00 hanging scales at Walmart, hang a bucket from it, zero the scale, and add grain to see what the grain weighs.

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Berkley-Sc...-Tape/16637411
    Yes, this is much easier than taking your grain shopping with you. It also allows you to weigh your grain daily and if you want to make feed changes, etc.



  19. #19
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    And how much does this weight in pounds?
    2-3 ounces, as a matter of fact.
    Click here before you buy.


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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    2-3 ounces, as a matter of fact.
    Nice!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



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