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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    303

    Exclamation Stall rest--behaved for me, b*$&h with barn staff

    So, I move my mare to a new facility with gorgeous, ample pasture turnout and she goes and strains her suspensory (horses!!!). So now she is on stall rest.

    She was okay for the first week, but is now apparently misbehaving badly for the barn staff. For example, being aggressive, or if they move her to another stall so they can clean her stall, she won't cooperate and will really act up when they try to put her back in her own stall.

    She also apparently kicks at her stall walls all night enough that it's keeping the owner awake and they are complaining

    The funny thing is, when I go out in the evenings to groom her and do a second stall cleaning, she is perfectly behaved. She has actually been surprisingly relaxed. She stands perfectly still to be groomed and practically falls asleep! And no aggressive behavior to me at all. I can go in her stall with her and do whatever I like. No issues cleaning the stall.

    She's going to be on stall rest for a while yet, so obviously this has me concerned. I don't want her injuring anyone (or herself further), and I don't want to get kicked out of the barn.

    I have contacted my vet, but also wanted to see what you COTHers thought. Has anyone dealt with lengthy stall rest, stall kicking or very different behavior between handlers?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    24,019

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lilypad View Post
    So, I move my mare to a new facility with gorgeous, ample pasture turnout and she goes and strains her suspensory (horses!!!). So now she is on stall rest.

    She was okay for the first week, but is now apparently misbehaving badly for the barn staff. For example, being aggressive, or if they move her to another stall so they can clean her stall, she won't cooperate and will really act up when they try to put her back in her own stall.

    She also apparently kicks at her stall walls all night enough that it's keeping the owner awake and they are complaining

    The funny thing is, when I go out in the evenings to groom her and do a second stall cleaning, she is perfectly behaved. She has actually been surprisingly relaxed. She stands perfectly still to be groomed and practically falls asleep! And no aggressive behavior to me at all. I can go in her stall with her and do whatever I like. No issues cleaning the stall.

    She's going to be on stall rest for a while yet, so obviously this has me concerned. I don't want her injuring anyone (or herself further), and I don't want to get kicked out of the barn.

    I have contacted my vet, but also wanted to see what you COTHers thought. Has anyone dealt with lengthy stall rest, stall kicking or very different behavior between handlers?
    Better living through chemicals. Call your vet and ask for a long term tranq. Kicking the stall wall is not good for stall rest.
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2003
    Posts
    4,521

    Default

    Can you be there to see them handle her a couple of times?

    We had a horse on stall rest and the barn owner (a sort of horse guy) had some problems with him for stall cleaning as well. Turned out he wasn't taking simple measures - like halter fully on, leadrope attached, closing barn door (next to stall he was in) if he was being full of himself, coming at the horse with a tough guy attitude rather than a been there done that attitude which seemed to set up a confrontational situation and escalate any behaviors.

    Since BO wasn't going to change handling the horse their way, and a large part of the problem was being left behind where he couldn't see another horse, we ended up working something out with the BO to turn him out in a very small pen where he could see the other horses which solved the problem for him.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,282

    Default

    Reserpine is your friend in this situation


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2007
    Location
    My very own sliver of heaven.
    Posts
    1,327

    Default

    This is one of those times that I'm 110% on the pro-drug bandwagon Like Woodsperson said, Reserpine is your friend!!
    Nine out of ten times, you'll get it wrong...but it's that tenth time that you get it right that makes all the difference.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    223

    Default

    I don't know if she's a herd bound horse or not but this is just a thought, when they move her to clean her stall is she all alone in the barn and when you go in the evening I would assume that the other horses would be back inside? Maybe she needs a buddy for part of the day in a stall where she can see them.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    10,130

    Default

    Aside from herd-related behavior as noted in post #6, another trigger can be feeding time. But that won't explain the kicking at night.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    519

    Default

    My horse acts up for anyone but me. She is gentle, calm, relaxed, easy going, I can do ANYTHING with or around her with no problem. Bring in someone else and she is likely to have a meltdown. There have been a few times in past years when she needed to be on stall rest or modified stall rest for an extended period of time and what really helped was being there when the barn staff was working with her.

    Like a PP said, sometimes people do things a bit differently and the horse doesn't respond well. I make a point to school the barn staff on how my horse needs to be handled and explain that it is very, very important that they follow the same protocol I do with her. For example, treat when entering stall, then put on halter and lead rope, but don't tie the rope to anything - just loop it over her neck. Talk to her as they are cleaning the stall, pet her gently before and after leaving. Perhaps leading her up and down the barn aisle for a minute would help.

    Often people can be a little harsh and defensive in these situations and that sets the horse off even more. Perhaps your horse is running out of hay quickly therefore kicks a lot and needs a nibble net, or needs to be changed to a different stall where she can see her buddies or there needs to be a temporary rotation system in place where there is always a buddy inside with her. Drugs can help but if your horse is perfectly well behaved for you then there is something happening when you're not there that's causing such a drastic change in behaviour. I would focus in on that before going right for the drugs.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Location
    Little Pond Farm
    Posts
    366

    Default

    How long do you spend with her? My guess is she is bored and aggitated from being left out. I had a stall rest horse who I told the owner needed drugs, her response was that he was fine when she was there. NO SHIT a horse doing something even if it is hand grazing or a good grooming will be happierbetter then a horse left to stand 23 hours a day. You need to spend as much time with your horse as possible.



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