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  1. #1
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Default "Shut up and ride" I get it now!

    I am very literal and therefore it is sometimes hard for me to understand colloquialisms. For example, "shut up and ride" just sounds like exasperation to me. I get no direction from it so I just hear it, shrug and walk away.

    Yesterday I was talking to one of our Western trainers about how I had that moment of brilliance with Fella and then lost it. He listened and he said, "just ride" and I said, "I don't know what that means".

    He explained that he goes through the same thing. He'll be riding a horse and get a moment of brilliance and wonder how he got it, and then just ride the horse more, get that moment of brilliance again, and again until he starts to understand how he was accomplishing it.

    I know that sounds silly, but for some of us we need the explanation. I should expect that I will have that occasional glimpse into brilliance, and it will be sporadic at first, but that the only way to sort out the cause and thereby make it more intentional is to keep riding and not be discouraged by the other times when nothing seems to be working.

    I thought I'd post it here for those others who have the same wiring issues I have when it comes to this kind of thing.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    7 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
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    Excellent. It really is about, stop (over)thinking, try it, give it some time, and don't be afraid to make mistakes.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    I am very literal and therefore it is sometimes hard for me to understand colloquialisms. For example, "shut up and ride" just sounds like exasperation to me. I get no direction from it so I just hear it, shrug and walk away.

    Yesterday I was talking to one of our Western trainers about how I had that moment of brilliance with Fella and then lost it. He listened and he said, "just ride" and I said, "I don't know what that means".

    He explained that he goes through the same thing. He'll be riding a horse and get a moment of brilliance and wonder how he got it, and then just ride the horse more, get that moment of brilliance again, and again until he starts to understand how he was accomplishing it.

    I know that sounds silly, but for some of us we need the explanation. I should expect that I will have that occasional glimpse into brilliance, and it will be sporadic at first, but that the only way to sort out the cause and thereby make it more intentional is to keep riding and not be discouraged by the other times when nothing seems to be working.

    I thought I'd post it here for those others who have the same wiring issues I have when it comes to this kind of thing.

    Paula
    Hard to believe it's been almost 3 years since I've had a chance to take lessons but back then my instructor said "If your horse does it once you know she can do it"
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Default

    When you are wired a certain way, you may not understand intrinsically social situations, have to learn then by rote, as in this situation, when told this, doing that is the correct way to behave.

    One example, I walked into the bank, a friend was already doing business sitting there with the teller, that is also a very good friend, talked to me and asked questions, so I walked over, visited a minute and walked off.

    Ooops!

    Walking off, I realized my learned behavior, that is when someone speaks, be polite and make eye contact, walk over to them, say a few words in answer and then you can move on with your business.

    EXCEPT that situation was more complicated than that.
    It was one where you just say HI! but don't really answer and make conversation at all, they were conducting business and being over the top polite saying Hi!, but didn't mean they wanted to talk.

    Social situations are full of many basic rules, that like the English language, that then have way, way too many exceptions to each rule.

    Most people are born with the wiring to learn practically from birth how to interact with others, to read them, the give and take that is body and verbal connecting with other humans.
    Then, there are some that are like a color blind person, that only sees part of the color, here social, spectrum and has to keep learning and making a constant effort to paying way too much attention to the whole situation, like a blind person has to traffic lights, remembering at each light all over again if red is the upper and left or bottom and right one, when someone not color blind does't has to think, their brain not completely involved, but cruises on a small part of that knowledge at first sight.

    If someone had told me to "shup up and ride", I would have taken it first as someone that is cranky/tired and taking it out on me being short, so no offense meant, probably and that I was on my own, need to figure what my question is without help.

    Yes, you are not alone and thank you, one more situation example helps understand better how this confusing world of humans work.

    I say, when trying to communicate, give me horses over humans any time.
    Horses express their wishes clearly, you don't have to second guess what they are saying.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Sep. 13, 2006
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    I overthink, Im trying hard & do to much, my horse needs me to do to less. Its really good when I dont really do anything but he does it. I getcha.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  6. #6
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Default

    And another thing! Or really, a contrarian rant:

    According to most people, I think too much. If I had a nickel for every time someone said so.... But, honey, thinking is like breathing. You do what comes natural. Also, no horse has ever complained about me giving it an overly intellectual ride.

    I say this because the Shut Up And Ride *is* great for what the OP's instructor said... at first. But if you aren't analyzing the bejeesuz out of what you did, what that felt like and what the horse did before that mysterious moment of brilliance, you won't be able to repeat it. And what's the point of having a good bit of performance show up like a winning lottery ticket?

    And another, another thing: The things to analyze are timing and feel, not so much equations or tax code or metaphysics.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    I feel your pain, MVP. I am very either/or. Let me give you a ridiculous example. Many years ago I had a bit of a windfall and I ask my friend whether I should spend it or save it. She waited a beat and suggested I save some and spend some. I literally did not think of that until she said it. By the same token for those of us who analyze the snot out of things it's not that we need to stop analyzing the snot out of things, but we must also feel by doing.

    You are absolutely right; when Ricky is riding the horse to feel those moments of brilliance the only way he can ever get them intentional is to analyze how those moments of brilliance are occurring. And the only way he can see how those moments of brilliance are occurring is by riding the horse. So the take home for us is do both.

    LOL other people will read this and go, "well duh". Like you said, for some of us this is not intuitive. Often people get frustrated with me because I ask too many questions. Most of the time I'm not trying to be obnoxious, I'm trying to understand you.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Oct. 26, 2010
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    I think I go overboard in BOTH directions. I overthink (ask my hubby) and then sometimes I don't think at all (ask my hubby). Depends on how I'm feeling that day, who I have or haven't talked to, what I have done or not done...yada, yada. Add on top, I'm aging not so gracefully and things which used to be easy aren't so much any more, which is incredibly frustrating.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2003
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    Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
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    Default

    What it comes down to is that you feel the ride more then think the ride. You get to the point that you can feel the horse bulge to the out side and you put up a block without thinking about it. But to get to that point you need to start feeling the bulge as it is happening and then think I need to block the movement. Then you can start just riding and feeling how the horse is going and what you need to do to move the horse the way you want.

    So when I hear someone say just ride. I want to say just feel the ride. Don't think about it to the point that you are trying to understand what you did to get it, but feel the ride so that you know that feeling the next time it comes along and then you will feel it more often.
    Are you going to cowboy up or lie there and BLEED?


    6 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Nov. 16, 2004
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    NE Indiana
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    Default

    I recently had the same epiphany - realized that I didn't understand very much from my dressage lessons until I spent hours and hours on the trail.



  11. #11
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    What was the epiphany? How did the trail riding help elucidate this?
    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  12. #12
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    What was the epiphany? How did the trail riding help elucidate this?
    Paula
    Yes, I too was wondering, tell us more, please.



  13. #13
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleanor View Post
    What it comes down to is that you feel the ride more then think the ride. You get to the point that you can feel the horse bulge to the out side and you put up a block without thinking about it. But to get to that point you need to start feeling the bulge as it is happening and then think I need to block the movement. Then you can start just riding and feeling how the horse is going and what you need to do to move the horse the way you want.

    So when I hear someone say just ride. I want to say just feel the ride. Don't think about it to the point that you are trying to understand what you did to get it, but feel the ride so that you know that feeling the next time it comes along and then you will feel it more often.
    I strive to be a great teacher. To me, that means getting a lot of words to attach to non-linguistic things-- including physical feelings felt in riding a horse. To me, then, I don't know something like the cause of a horse suddenly turning brilliant until I can explain what I did just before. If I think about it, and add it to decades of riding experience, I can turn that correlation into a causal story. I can test that by doing the same thing again and seeing what the horse gives me. If it's not the same, I have ideas about what I can change in my body to find the one cause that had the greatest effect.

    I hope this makes sense.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Nov. 16, 2004
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    NE Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    What was the epiphany? How did the trail riding help elucidate this?
    Paula
    Well, you'll have to forgive me because I'm not very good at putting my feelings in to words, and it really is more of a feeling for me. When I was in lessons and only riding in the arena I had nothing to apply any exercise to so it was just a series of steps that I would memorize and do. I don't show, I just want to be a good rider so I didn't even have the goal of doing a test in a way that would deliver me evidence of my "knowledge" on a piece of paper or by a ribbon.

    At the point when I hit the trail and stopped thinking about anything at all, eventually it started coming together. Half-halts for instance: before it was sort of like, ok do one at C, then at X, then at A. Done. But until I was trotting past that scary mailbox that my mare bolted by the last time, I didn't USE the half-halt for anything. Or shoulder in instead of a jiggy ride home. Side pass before we get to the culvert that she balks at...using the tools that I didn't know I had because I had never learned a real life application until I stopped thinking about them as exercises.

    Does that make sense?

    ETA: the lessons are still indispensable! I'm looking forward to starting up again soon, before we go on our first LD but for me, I need a balance of schooling and then "just riding".


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Apr. 15, 2003
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    Northeast MA
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    I have a slightly different interpretation of "shut up and ride". When getting ready to speak and when speaking, one is no longer"in the moment" of riding. One is thinking about what will be said, attending to the instructor's response and then hearing the words the instructor uses to respond. While that may have something to do with what the horse was doing a few minutes ago, it blocks out what the horse is doing in the now.

    Or, if you're like me, it's because you're arguing with your instructor and he's sick of it.
    They don't call me frugal for nothing.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Apr. 3, 2006
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    Shut up and ride on the trail translates to, "ride YOUR horse". Meaning, stop worrying what others are doing and ride your own horse.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by frugalannie View Post
    Or, if you're like me, it's because you're arguing with your instructor and he's sick of it.
    Too funny! Although I don't argue with my instructors, I am famous for asking "Why" a lot!

    I think that I have most often heard the Shut Up And Ride refrain used in conjunction with people who read a lot of theory and have an imperfect understanding of what they have read. They talk a lot about the theory of it all, but rarely (if at all) actually ride.

    I boarded with a woman several years ago that was like that. She took a lesson every now and then, but had a hard time sticking with it and tended to never work with an instructor for very long. She read every equine magazine out there, bought all the books and watched a boatload of videos. She could pepper every conversation with all the buzz words, but had such a weak understanding of the practical application that she often came across as foolish.

    She would get into little arguments with people, mostly because of how annoying it was to have her make proclamations, get called on it and then cry foul over how poorly she was treated because she was a newbie.

    She wanted to jump in the worst possible way. But it just wasn't safe. Her seat was not secure or even close to being independent, her hands had more bounce than a pogo stick and she was fairly unfit. After days and days of being told about how she was talking to the repair guy at the tack shop about building a cantle "extension" that would give her the security she was lacking, the BO told her to just shut up and ride. "Talk, talk, talk! Short cut, short cut, short cut. Shut up and ride. That is how you get better and once you get better, you'll understand just how little you actually know".

    About 7 years ago I was falling into a bad trap with my riding. I was getting to the point where I was coming up with every excuse in the book about why I couldn't/shouldn't ride at that particular moment in time. It was too windy, or it looked like it might rain, or it was too hot, or my horse was a little too high-headed. The list was endless. The lady I was taking lessons with at the time told me to suck it up and ride anyway. So for me, Shut Up And Ride can mean that I need to suck it up and ride anyway.
    Shielah


    4 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Apr. 3, 2006
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    So nice to know I'm not the only one that suffers from "why I can't ride today syndrome". This year will be different! I swear! I'm eliminating all the reasons but maybe one.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by poltroon View Post
    Excellent. It really is about, stop (over)thinking, try it, give it some time, and don't be afraid to make mistakes.
    I actually think this (along with not going into the associated GRRR! MUST WORK HARDER AND TIGHTEN EVERYTHING! mode) is the hardest thing to do in all of riding. For me, anyway!!



  20. #20
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    Hundredacres, I completely understand what you're saying. You had been having an academic, cerebral understanding, and then on the trail it became visceral. I can talk to you about the mechanics of walking, for example, but you'll do it intuitively if I leave you to your own devices.

    When Ricky explained to me what he meant, a lightbulb went off in my head. "Oh, I need to ride more often and have faith that all these things will work out." Even when those rides are alot of "Gnghhhn I'm making progress.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    1 members found this post helpful.

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