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  1. #1
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    Apr. 20, 2004
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    Default What to do, what to do???

    I was just offered a 4 yo dog from a reputable breeder that I expressed interest in getting a puppy from down the road (ie after 14 yo dog passes). The bitch is beautiful. I don't know her temperament or tolerance for grouchy old dogs and playful cat.

    Mr grouch is enjoying his one on one time with me and his new found ability to intimidate or reprimand the cat when kitty is counter or garbage surfing.

    I have only been a one dog household for about 3.5 months (PTS 16 yo girl in December right after Christmas). Although my senior citizen has no immediate issues it is only a matter of time at this age.

    Conflicted. I don't want to pass up the chance of a potentially nice dog (unknown temperament) but I'm not sure if I want to upset the apple cart by introducinng a stranger to the pack albeit a very cute one. I'm not sure if I need enablers or people to talk me out of it.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



  2. #2
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    I might be reading you wrong, but you just don't sound real *excited* about this potential new dog. And if you're not excited about her, then just skip it for now. Presumably, this breeder you like isn't getting out of the business anytime soon? There will be another really nice dog that comes up, at a time that might be better for you.



  3. #3
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    Mar. 13, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    From the enabler point of view...

    I bought a corgi puppy (pet quality) from a great show breeder, then a year later contacted the same breeder about a second puppy. No pups available, but she offered me a year-old male who hadn't apparently set the show ring alight. He had been in a kennel his whole life, but I ended up taking a chance on him, sight unseen and it was the best irrational decision I ever made.

    Their breeder knew the family temperament inside and out, and her predictions for both dogs came true in every way. If you trust the breeder about the pup's suitability, I'd say it's a great deal.

    Good luck, whichever way you decide!
    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." –Bradley Trevor Greive



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
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    4,565

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    will the breeder allow a test visit of a week or two? That might make your decision for you if Old Grouch is seriously put out. My dogs get the world handed to them on a platter at the age of 10 and beyond. Once you've lived with me that long, you deserve to have your wishes and needs met first. Old age should be pleasant and easy, not stressed and unhappy.

    I have been offered dogs here too, but I want a puppy, and I will wait for that puppy till the time is right for ME. I will not cave, as this may be the last or next to last dog I have (getting older here).



  5. #5
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    Nov. 13, 2005
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    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
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    I'll give you the advice I got when I was looking for a dog: Go with your gut. See if you can do a 2 week trial or something. If that's not possible and your gut is saying now's not the time, then pass. Breeder may at least allow the two dogs to do a "meet" somewhere. It's worth asking!
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    How much do you like the older dog? How much do you think it will lessen his quality of life to have a new puppy in your house?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Apr. 20, 2004
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    Unfortunately, a meet and greet is not an option. Breeder lives over 2000 miles from me. The Europeon breeding of this dog is not easy to come by in the US. Kind of a one shot deal.

    I sent an email inquiring about her temperament and behaviour.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
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    Eastern Shore, MD
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    Oh, OP, that's a tough one!

    I understand where you're coming from as my Big Black Dog is getting up there (he's 14 this year) and there's a really cool young dog at my local shelter who looks like he'd be right up my alley, and I've got several enabling friends who think I should get him (or at least foster him). As it stands, I'm plenty busy with the Big guy (who's getting fairly decrepit) and the Corgi Horde, but I'm terribly tempted.

    In your position, it sounds (as some other posters have mentioned) that you're not totally convinced that you want the new girl, and honestly? The fact that you can't do a meet and greet first sounds like a deal killer to me. I've done it before (in fact, the Corgi Horde were all taken in without meeting them first), but my old guy wasn't so old then, and I was really ready to add to the family. New girl might be the nicest dog ever, but if Mr. Grouch (or the cat) isn't happy with her, what will you do? Would you be able to rehome her or send her back? For me, I owe it to the ones I have right now to make them as happy as I am able to BEFORE I'm allowed to think about making a "new hire" happy.

    I hate to not be an enabler, but I totally get where you're coming from. If it helps, in my experience, the "ones that have gotten away" seem to end up in places that are perfect for them, and I get a great deal of happiness out of knowing that they're happy with their new people. Plus, when one falls through? It leaves the potential for a new one down the road, who might need you more.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    on the other hand, if your old dog is used to the companionship of another dog in the home, he might be feeling a bit lonely and would like some company. A puppy would be too much for an oldster, but a 4 year old might be fine.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    on the other hand, if your old dog is used to the companionship of another dog in the home, he might be feeling a bit lonely and would like some company. A puppy would be too much for an oldster, but a 4 year old might be fine.
    That is what I was thinking. I vetoed the puppy idea but an older dog may be fine. Her temperament sounds perfect. The breeder described her as a great dog with no vices. Next step is a phone conversation. It is important that the senior dog is happy. He had to wait about 14 years to be top dog. I wish I could post a photo of her. She is a beautiful.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



  11. #11
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    duplicate post
    Last edited by yankeeclipper; Apr. 15, 2013 at 10:11 AM. Reason: Duplicate
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



  12. #12
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    Dec. 20, 2009
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    To support the enabling: I have a 12 yr old chow/shep mix. She came to me as a young adult when I had a 9 yr old, and that worked great. Fast forward 11 yrs, and I recently lost her 7 yr old companion to IMHA. Gave about 5 minutes thought to letting her be an only dog, and then went shopping. We opted for a smaller dog this time, so that there would be no 60 lb goof slamming her around. The little bugger (25 lbs) is probably close to two years old and the big girl LOVES LOVES him. Back to acting like she's 5 or 6, instigating play, taking his toys, and showing off. I think the younger dog helps keep them active and interested in things. (Also, my sister and I were fighting over who got to hold the big girl's leash on walks so....in the interest of domestic peace...)
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  13. #13
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    Mar. 11, 2007
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    Montana
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    My older dogs love to play with the younger ones, in fact I should be breaking up a pretty intense play spell right now. I can't imagine just having one dog, I've always staggered my older good dogs with pups so they can learn from the older ones.

    But for heaven's sake, if you don't really want to add one right now please don't! It will just annoy you at every turn.



  14. #14
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    I didn't want to add a puppy because they are a lot of work. I am very interested in this dog. She really sounds great. What is the market value of a retired show dog? Is it half the cost of a puppy? Would a breeder be offended asking if the price is negotiable?
    Last edited by yankeeclipper; Apr. 17, 2013 at 08:41 AM.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



  15. #15
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    Mar. 13, 2007
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    Don't know if it's helpful, but for the corgis I mentioned above, I paid about a third more for the retired show dog than I did for the pet-quality puppy. But he was an intact male, I and received full registration papers on him, so breeding him would have been an option.

    I would certainly make a counter offer to the breeder. The breeder I worked with really wanted to free up kennel space—getting an adult dog a good home was an added bonus.

    I really hope this all works out for you!
    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." –Bradley Trevor Greive



  16. #16
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by yankeeclipper View Post
    I didn't want to add a puppy because they are a lot of work. I am very interested in this dog. She really sounds like great. What is the market value of a retired show dog? Is it half the cost of a puppy? Would consider a counter offer or be offended?
    Is she still intact? Are you planning on breeding her?

    I would expect the price on an intact, finished bitch to be MORE than a show puppy, since she's already proven she's got what it takes. A puppy, while cute, is still very much an unknown.

    If she's a show dog washout, spayed, then I would expect the price to be the cost of a pet puppy (or less.)

    Then again, I'm just musing here about what I would expect, so I might be way off



  17. #17
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    A friend of mine has a breed ring washout (lovely bitch, she just didn't want to show) who was spayed after her first litter (puppies were lovely and have gone on to show successfully themselves, so not a case of not being a good producer). She was given the dog by the breeder because the breeder felt that friend's home would be a good fit (and it is).

    If you're getting a proven (via show ring or otherwise) intact dog, then I'd expect to pay more (because said dog is proven and still capable of producing) as others have said.

    Neutered and older (of either sex) - I'd definitely expect to pay less, if anything at all, but that's just my experience and opinion.



  18. #18
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    Apr. 20, 2004
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    She will come spayed. I have an intact male and DO NOT want to raise puppies. She is finished and did extremely well. Won 3 specialties so not a washed out show dog. Breeder wants to place in a pet home now because both her and the co-owner have some life issues leaving them both with little to no time to do anything with her and their other dogs. I think she had one litter of puppies last year.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



  19. #19
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by yankeeclipper View Post
    She will come spayed. I have an intact male and DO NOT want to raise puppies. She is finished and did extremely well. Won 3 specialties so not a washed out show dog. Breeder wants to place in a pet home now because both her and the co-owner have some life issues leaving them both with little to no time to do anything with her and their other dogs. I think she had one litter of puppies last year.
    You don't mention the breed (very rare could be different) but most ex-show dogs meeting this sort of description are sold at a nominal fee ... if she has extensive training, she may have a higher monetary value.
    Once dog is spayed, blood lines are irrelevant, showing is irrelevant, dog is now just a pretty pet - except she's likely not really been a pet dog: also consider average lifespan, depending upon breed, 4 is either young or already middle aged.
    Breeder has already extracted maximum value from this dog.

    Only you can decide what this dog is worth to you


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    The breed is not rare but the Europeon blood lines combined in this dog is hard to find in the US. I recently put down my dog with similar breeding and wanted to find the same lines. I discovered it was easier said than done. She was born and raised in a home rather than kennel and has little training beyond the confirmation ring. Longevity of this breed is about 12-14 years.

    Thank you.
    \"You have two choices when a defining moment comes along - you can either define the moment, or let the moment define you.\" Tin Cup



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