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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    this horse WON'T be caught without a treat. i am not going to chase a horse around the pasture for 10 hours. and he needs to learn that coming to humans is not a bad thing.
    But it IS from his point of view since you "only ride him so he knows it's work."
    You can't be bothered to change your habits and yet expect him to do something that makes no sense to him. You've found something that has been somewhat successful (clicker training,) yet can't be bothered to learn how to do it properly.
    Is there a smaller pen you could lure him to off the pasture?
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  2. #22
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    Who said i'm not training him? We are working with him almost daily. The problem is in the catching.

    No, i cannot put him in a smaller place. all the paddocks are a couple of acres. He has 24/7 hay in a covered hay feeder. So there is no way to "deprive' him of anything. I love how some of you think it's SO easy, that i must be a moron. This is NOT easy. How long would you all stand in a paddock trying to catch an uncatchable horse? seriously, i can spend about 3 hours tops. And by then i'd be exhausted.

    He has 2 pasture buddies that i can catch. i can walk up and give them treats, i can remove them from the paddock, etc..i tried to make him jealous, but he was not.

    YES of course we give him tons of rewards when he is caught. Left him graze, give him treats, give him love, etc..

    I guess i'm going to go get a leather halter and short rope and keep it on him and have the barn start feeding him inside. it is the only thing i can think of to encourage him to be caught.



  3. #23
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    That's a good plan...get the barn to train him for you.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    How long would you all stand in a paddock trying to catch an uncatchable horse? seriously, i can spend about 3 hours tops. And by then i'd be exhausted.
    You spend as long as it takes, and if you go out there with the right attitude it usually doesn't take as long as you expect.

    It sounds like your not a partner/friend to your horse. You slap a saddle on him, "train" and then throw him back out. He's giving back what's he getting - nothing.

    He's a living breathing thing not a tool. Horses will tell you what the problem is if your willing to listen.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    My beloved old guy (an Arab/App hony, for the record) was a terror to catch early on - at one point, I remember that it took 5 people!
    After that, he went out in a turnout halter with a catch rope and we worked really hard to get him to be catchable. He would allow barn staff to bring him in for mealtimes with other horses, so there was some positive reinforcement taking place there, but that isnt' exactly being caught.

    I ended up walking him down, repeatedly - but once I caught him, I changed the game - I might catch him, give him a treat, walk him for a few steps (so he'd know he was "caught"), let go and then give him a treat before he realized I'd let him go and walk away, or I might catch him, treat him, bring him all the way up to the gate, give him a treat and then let him stay out, or catch him, treat him, groom him or rub an itchy spot and then let him go. Sometimes, I'd just walk up, touch his butt or pat his neck and walk off. He eventually realized that I would ALWAYS have a treat if he'd let me touch/catch him and that my catching him DID NOT ALWAYS mean I was going to make him work.

    Eventually, he was able to go out without a halter, and I did the same goofy games - I might walk out, loop the lead over his neck and then let him go. Or I might walk out, halter him and then take it right back off, but there were ALWAYS treats for good behavior (defined as "letting me get control of you"). If he was being stinky about the halter or lead rope, I'd wad up a piece of baling twine so I could rub him and catch him without the halter (he was one of those who was caught if you could get something around his neck).

    He never was one of those horses who'd come when called, but he would always let me catch him, eventually. He definitely had his "I don't think I feel like being caught today" days, and I'd have to walk him down, but that was only ever for a few minutes at most and those days were VERY few and far between, and greatly outnumbered by the times when I'd walk out to just say hi and give him a pat and then have him follow me all the way back to the barn sans halter.
    That made all the work totallly worth it - damn, I miss him.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Oct. 1, 2011
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    Try looking up some of the other threads on this subject. I'm a fan of the John Lyons method, where you chase the horse away if he tries to run away from you. They quickly learn that it's not much fun when you make them move. No treats needed, but having a smaller enclosure helps. Still, the first time I used this tactic was in a 6 acre pasture--not exactly small, but it still worked. It's worked like a charm every time I've used it since then too. I posted more details on an earlier thread.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by zipperfoot View Post
    Try looking up some of the other threads on this subject. I'm a fan of the John Lyons method, where you chase the horse away if he tries to run away from you. They quickly learn that it's not much fun when you make them move. No treats needed, but having a smaller enclosure helps. Still, the first time I used this tactic was in a 6 acre pasture--not exactly small, but it still worked. It's worked like a charm every time I've used it since then too. I posted more details on an earlier thread.
    I did this too. He wants to run, make him run. Keep him moving and at more than a walk. If he is getting fed grain out there, that has to stop. He only gets grain inside.

    What's that great quote? 'No one said it is easy, but it is simple.'
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Apr. 14, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saidapal View Post
    You spend as long as it takes, and if you go out there with the right attitude it usually doesn't take as long as you expect.

    It sounds like your not a partner/friend to your horse. You slap a saddle on him, "train" and then throw him back out. He's giving back what's he getting - nothing.

    He's a living breathing thing not a tool. Horses will tell you what the problem is if your willing to listen.
    You are so totally wrong. I am very kind to this horse and i don't "slap" anything on him. I take my time with him, i give him treats and i give him love, and i let him graze in hand.

    Ok, so if "as long as it takes' is a week, what should i do? camp out in the paddock? Eat sleep and urinate in the paddock? NOT going to happen. I should know better than to ask any Questions on this forum. To those who gave HELPFUL tips and advice, thank you.



  9. #29
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    I guess i'm going to go get a leather halter and short rope and keep it on him and have the barn start feeding him inside. it is the only thing i can think of to encourage him to be caught.
    Several people, including myself, have posted about a common, proven method that works every time. This takes patience, time, and the right attitude. Apparently you have none of those because you still think the best method will be to leave a halter on him and have the barn feed him?

    It sounds to me like you are afraid to be assertive with this horse and this can only lead to trouble.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
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  10. #30
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    wow.

    In a perfect world, we'd all have time to force the issue and address this "won't be caught" thing but reality is that folks have to work, have children, other obligations, etc. If you have only a couple of hours each evening, then that's what you have. And I don't say that to open the door for, "then you don't need this type of horse" comment. Water under the bridge; the horse is in the barn (er, paddock - but you get point)

    OP - you've been given some really good advice. We do a "Bluey" type program with ours and are fortunate to have only 1 ding dong who tries to pull the you won't catch me crap. We are also fortunate that we don't board and are not beholden to the boarding facility's other obligations; paddocks on hand, etc. We have pastures, paddocks, and what I call holding yards. Since it sounds like maybe your hands are tied, I'm going to suggest you throw money at this problem if the barn owner will allow it.

    Invest in some corral panels from the local farm/feed store and make a holding yard within your horse's current paddock. I bought some 10' panels not too long ago and they were $80/each brand new. This will give you a smaller space to force the issue.

    Our "you won't catch me" fool sort of worked like this: I "herd" her into the smaller holding yard (I don't have all day to mess with her) and lock her in. I walk up to her and when I'm about yay far, she's pins her ears, starts to turn away, and then I turn sideways and take 2 steps away from her; she then puts her ears forward and doesn't move away. Some time she wheels around and acts like she's going to buck but rarely does. We do this song & dance until she gives in, I walk up and halter her. At which point we just stand there for a few minutes of happy scratching and a treat or two. This was our routine for about 2 months. I now rarely have issues catching her. She doesn't come when called, etc. but I don't have to chase her. I'll take what I can get.

    As for the dangers of leaving halters on them...like many I've known horses to severely injure themselves b/c of halters being left on. I'm not a fan of the break-aways b/c the smart Houdinis just figure it out, dismantle the halter and laugh at you (our Pig Pen pony does this with any halter, for example - he can actually take off ANY halter, no matter how snug/tight without breaking it). Buy one of the cheap Indian leather halters; they break more easily - if your horse has white on its face be aware you might get some "bleed" from the cheapy leather. I knew a girl once who had a team of 4 small Pinto ponies. She did combined driving - was INCREDIBLY successful. NONE of the ponies could be caught and they were tiny & quick. They lived in a paddock among longleaf pines, not only wearing halters but lunge lines as well. VERY dangerous but that's what they did in order to get their hands on the little buggers.

    Good luck to you. This is a frustrating issue to deal with.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    I'll say it is frustrating! But the "walk them down" method really does work. It takes a while, and takes patience. When I first got my horse he was a three and a half year old just gelded horse who had NEVER been turned out in a pasture before (came from a show barn). Oh, the weeks and weeks of frustration trying to catch that horse! One of the women who worked at the barn would get on her bit smart quarter horse mare and corner my horse for me - in the beginning that was the only way I could catch him. It was a decent size pasture too. Slowly he came around and now he is no problem - will usually come when I call him, if not, he stands til I get there. I agree with (a) always having a treat; (b) no treat is given until halter is ON (c) teach horse the meaning of whatever you are going to call the treat (mine knows "treat" = carrot, "cookie" = cookie, and "candy" = peppermints.) (I know, not too spoiled!) When we were progressing with this training I would call out to him "Mondy! Come get a cookie!" He figured this one out pretty quickly.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    I empathize with you - this can be incredibly frustrating!!

    I've used the walking/sitting them down method with great success in the past. However, it can be extremely difficult in a large pasture - and if there are other horses in that pasture, it can seem impossible. It really takes a good amount of feel to do it correctly, and it may be that there are other methods or variations that could work for you better.

    I have had a few "you'll never catch me" types over the years. The worst was my ex's QH gelding. He had been a ranch horse in his early days and had always been roped to be caught. He had had some very rough handling by whoever rode him before we got him and he was terrified of people - especially men. The first time we put him in a large pasture, I had to walk him down to get him caught. He was in with some other horses who were only too happy to roar around bucking and carrying on while I doggedly walked him down. I eventually got him caught, petted him, gave him a cookie and let him go. I think I did that every day for a month and he got better and better every day. He now can be caught anywhere, and even comes when called. The first day is always the hardest. After that it gets exponentially better and better.

    I think getting your horse in a smaller enclosure by himself - even for just a month - would make your life so much easier. And catching him to bring him in to feed him is a great idea.

    Most importantly though, I think what makes a horse easy to catch is his desire to be with you. If being with you gives him comfort and makes him feel good, he'll choose to be with you... and your new problem with be getting him to stop following you around.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
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    Most importantly though, I think what makes a horse easy to catch is his desire to be with you. If being with you gives him comfort and makes him feel good, he'll choose to be with you... and your new problem with be getting him to stop following you around.[/QUOTE]

    This is SO true. My horse will ignore his hay if I'm sitting/standing outside his stall.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  14. #34
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    Jun. 24, 2004
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    Mmmm, let's recap all the ideas offered and turned down:
    - Walk him down - an art in itself and not for the short tempered owner lacking a sense of humour
    - "Chase" him off and keep him moving until he turns to you - best taught in a smaller area but easily achieved in a 2 acre pen.
    - Continue clicker training which you say your husband is having good luck with
    - Take a chair and a book and got sit in his pen.
    - Create a smaller pen in a corner of the 2 acre paddock so that you can lure him in there with grain - requires a couple of panels, easily bought and then resold on Craigslist
    - "Catching" the horse without an agenda - no riding or "work" for him, repeated multiple times

    I am probably forgetting some others mentioned here by helpful COTHers. And yes, all of them will take some time at the beginning. Have a nice day.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenm View Post
    Several people, including myself, have posted about a common, proven method that works every time. This takes patience, time, and the right attitude. Apparently you have none of those because you still think the best method will be to leave a halter on him and have the barn feed him?

    It sounds to me like you are afraid to be assertive with this horse and this can only lead to trouble.
    i don't know what you are reading, but i never said i was unwilling to try anything. i DO think that having him caught to be FED in a stall and then in the morning to be haltered so he can go out- will help him associate being caught with a good thing. So that is Lazy of me? Whatever. if it works it works. Who is afraid to be assertive?



  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    i don't know what you are reading, but i never said i was unwilling to try anything. i DO think that having him caught to be FED in a stall and then in the morning to be haltered so he can go out- will help him associate being caught with a good thing. So that is Lazy of me? Whatever. if it works it works. Who is afraid to be assertive?
    You already knocked down a tried and true method which is walking him down. Pretty much everyone has said it doesn't take that long, but you have to go in with the right attitude. In addition "standing" in a paddock isn't going to accomplish much of anything, except apparently to exhaust you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    How long would you all stand in a paddock trying to catch an uncatchable horse? seriously, i can spend about 3 hours tops. And by then i'd be exhausted.
    You also said you couldn't try the method of using a smaller space. As a reminder, after saying you wouldn't be able to try two good suggestions, you would just do it this way:

    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    I guess i'm going to go get a leather halter and short rope and keep it on him and have the barn start feeding him inside. it is the only thing i ican think of to encourage him to be caught.


    You asked for ideas, got some, and then came up with reasons you would not be trying them.
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
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  17. #37
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    This is a training issue. Look into John Lyons methods for teaching a horse to face you in the round pen. His attitude has to be changed and you must train him to behave a different way. It isn't hard to do, just takes time, but worth it when you can approach your horse and he stands to be caught.



  18. #38
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    The "chase him away" method I described really does work and it doesn't take hours and hours, at least in my experience. After trying unsuccessfully to "walk down" Sparky the Wonder Horse (5 hours on one day, in 2 separate sessions) in the 6 acre pasture, I used the chase method the next day and was able to walk up to him in about 20 minutes. Didn't put the halter on him that day, but did the next day or the day after--easily. As I said, I described it in an earlier thread. If anyone wants a rerun of the details, PM me.

    Good luck, whatever method you choose.



  19. #39
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    If I don't, she's all "Hiya, Crone, my best friend ever! Welcome to our humble pasture! May I tempt you with a martini?" But if I do have a halter, she looks at me like I'm something pale and squishy that lives under a damp log, and it's 23-skidoo.
    I just have to say I love your writing style...this made me laugh!!

    I do the "send-away" method. Don't want to come? Ok, but that means you gotta move your feet. So I throw the lead rope at the butt and wave my arms. With my latest "I don't want to be caught" boy, it took two short episodes of trot before he was done. And I do mean short. They always look at you like "hey, *I* was supposed to be leaving you...Where's the Fruitbat?"



  20. #40
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    Wait, this horse is ONLY out on a couple acres? I figured it was twenty or forty or a hundred the way the OP was talking about it. A couple acres is a cake walk!

    I wish I were closer. Catching a "don't wanna be caught" horse on a couple acres just isn't that hard, but you do have to have the right body language and a good understanding of when to push and when to wait.

    OP, if someone else is catching him to be fed and you're catching him to work, that's not going to solve your problem at all. Just a heads up and a fair warning.


    2 members found this post helpful.

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