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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default Rain Sheet vs. Light Weight Turnout

    I have a blanketing question.

    My horse hates being in his stall, so I try to keep him turned out nearly 24/7 unless the weather is severe.

    I'm in Indiana, so right now we're looking at average weather being in the 70s moving closer to about 90-100 once summer hits. He had atrocious rain rot when I purchased him (there are no run in sheds at our barn), so I want to prevent that from happening again.

    All the rain sheets I can find in his size (about 69) are ugly and black. He is also hard on blankets, so I'm worried something that's 600 denier won't last long. I purchased this for him, but I'm worried it may be a bit heavy for hot weather.

    Thoughts? He is not clipped now I but I will probably end up giving him a full body clip within a month or so as he is working up to heavy training.

    ETA: He will be moving south to KY in June to a facility that has run in sheds.

    Second edit: My husband suggested that since it will probably be hot and dry like last summer, when it does rain the heat will dry him and I could return the blanket. (Sounds like a husband suggestion. ) Does that sound reasonable? I really, really hate rain rot.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,258

    Default

    If he's fed properly, and you give him a good, thorough grooming daily, I'd say you probably won't need to blanket.

    Also blanketing in warmish, muggy temps like IN gets (I'm in IL so we get similar weather) I think might actually create the perfect environment for rainrot to develop.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!


    6 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
    Posts
    2,248

    Default

    I would not be blanketing in warm temps. It's just a recipe for disaster. Unless you can have someone put the sheet on right before it rains and take it off right after it stops, you're just asking for trouble. Instead make sure your horse is healthy and well groomed. I don't think I've ever seen a TRULY healthy horse get rainrot. My 5 are out all summer in crazy storms and rain, never had a case of rainrot


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,964

    Default

    Second the others that rain rot is a health issue, not a "ohhh, Poopsie got wet!" issue.

    Mine are out nekkid, and I don't particularly care if they get rained on, just saves me having to bath them. (Unless they then roll in the mud!) If you put a sheet on, he's going to sweat and get gross....THAT is going to cause rain rot more than anything!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    5,994

    Default

    I agree - weather that hot plus a sheet is more a prescription for skin crud than a wet horse is.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default

    Ahhh! Thank you! Looks like he'll go nekkid then. He'll prefer that anyways.

    Thanks again!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,809

    Default

    If in doubt a light spraying of Nolvasan ( chlorhexidine) Solution, will help prevent rain rot from rearing it's ugly head, on those somewhat warm rainy days.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,556

    Default

    Ground flax works very well in the feed to prevent all kinds of skin fungus. Or a skin supplement would work too


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    19,582

    Default

    I only blanket at night in rain if it's going to go below 40 degrees (50 for the almost ancient pony). You won't need a rainsheet in the summer in KY.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    If in doubt a light spraying of Nolvasan ( chlorhexidine) Solution, will help prevent rain rot from rearing it's ugly head, on those somewhat warm rainy days.
    Good suggestion! I hate always using my Vetricyn. So pricey.

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I only blanket at night in rain if it's going to go below 40 degrees (50 for the almost ancient pony). You won't need a rainsheet in the summer in KY.
    Oh, good! That's really nice confirmation to have.

    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    Ground flax works very well in the feed to prevent all kinds of skin fungus. Or a skin supplement would work too
    I've been thinking about adding flax to his diet anyways. I think I will!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2005
    Location
    Crestwood, KY
    Posts
    1,436

    Default

    Agreed on the flax. My sensitive skin TBx has always been prone to rain rot and scratches, and after I started adding whole flax last fall she made it through the winter wet season without ANY skin problems at all. Love it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheOtherHorse View Post
    Agreed on the flax. My sensitive skin TBx has always been prone to rain rot and scratches, and after I started adding whole flax last fall she made it through the winter wet season without ANY skin problems at all. Love it.
    This is my horse! How much do you give her per day?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2005
    Location
    Crestwood, KY
    Posts
    1,436

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lferguson View Post
    This is my horse! How much do you give her per day?
    1 cup a day


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SAcres View Post
    I don't think I've ever seen a TRULY healthy horse get rainrot. My 5 are out all summer in crazy storms and rain, never had a case of rainrot
    wow, really? I guess I've had some truly unhealthy horses that my vets have thought were just fine.

    I think most people nip rain rot before it gets really bad. When MOST of us who have "truly healthy horses" find one or two tiny patches we're all over it, scrubbing and getting it treated. People who neglect their horse's health will also let rain rot get out of control, and those are the horses you see with the scabs all over their body. jmho.

    I agree with you on the blanketing though, definitely not something I would do constantly in the warm temps. It's not the rain that causes rain rot, it's just that the rain provides the moisture that allows the bacteria and/or fungus (I'm not sure which it is actually) to actually spead and grow. Plus a heavy winter coat, or a cut or scrape can make it worse. Horses can get rain rot without a drop of rain.

    With one mare I had, the best thing to do was to let her dry out if there was a long wet spell. So if we had a lot of rainy days in a row, I'd make sure she came in at night, maybe not every night, and get dry, gave her a thorough brushing with brushes that I'd clean in iodine soap. She also got bathed in an iodine based shampoo if she got scabs. She never got rain rot BAD all over her body, just patches up along her back, you couldn't say she wasn't healthy, and my vet certainly didn't say she wasn't healthy. Again, checking her every day and nipping it before it got bad prevented it from getting out of control.

    My current gelding would occasionally get a patch or two of rain rot in weird places (legs... tall pasture grass) where we used to live. Moving here has completely stopped him from getting it and he hasn't had any in five years. Which makes no sense to me, because if anything my new place has more mud and rain/damp issues than my old one which had sandy soil and sunshine. So, who knows... I guess all the dew on the tall pasture grass was worse than a muddy spring... for him.
    But once again, it's not JUST a health issue, because clearly his health was just as fine then as it is now (I didn't just start taking care of him recently) but rain rot isn't something you have to go around keeping your horse dry about. Just treat it if you have it, and CHECK for it, don't let it go.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldpony66 View Post
    wow, really? I guess I've had some truly unhealthy horses that my vets have thought were just fine.

    I think most people nip rain rot before it gets really bad. When MOST of us who have "truly healthy horses" find one or two tiny patches we're all over it, scrubbing and getting it treated. People who neglect their horse's health will also let rain rot get out of control, and those are the horses you see with the scabs all over their body. jmho.

    I agree with you on the blanketing though, definitely not something I would do constantly in the warm temps. It's not the rain that causes rain rot, it's just that the rain provides the moisture that allows the bacteria and/or fungus (I'm not sure which it is actually) to actually spead and grow. Plus a heavy winter coat, or a cut or scrape can make it worse. Horses can get rain rot without a drop of rain.

    With one mare I had, the best thing to do was to let her dry out if there was a long wet spell. So if we had a lot of rainy days in a row, I'd make sure she came in at night, maybe not every night, and get dry, gave her a thorough brushing with brushes that I'd clean in iodine soap. She also got bathed in an iodine based shampoo if she got scabs. She never got rain rot BAD all over her body, just patches up along her back, you couldn't say she wasn't healthy, and my vet certainly didn't say she wasn't healthy. Again, checking her every day and nipping it before it got bad prevented it from getting out of control.

    My current gelding would occasionally get a patch or two of rain rot in weird places (legs... tall pasture grass) where we used to live. Moving here has completely stopped him from getting it and he hasn't had any in five years. Which makes no sense to me, because if anything my new place has more mud and rain/damp issues than my old one which had sandy soil and sunshine. So, who knows... I guess all the dew on the tall pasture grass was worse than a muddy spring... for him.
    But once again, it's not JUST a health issue, because clearly his health was just as fine then as it is now (I didn't just start taking care of him recently) but rain rot isn't something you have to go around keeping your horse dry about. Just treat it if you have it, and CHECK for it, don't let it go.

    I'd say you're probably right on this. When I purchased him and he had all the rain rot, he was at the same barn he is now eating the same food in the same environment. He has not had rain rot since I got rid of it the first time, and the difference is he is now groomed every day.



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