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  1. #1
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    Default EquiShure = baking soda?!

    I searched, but didn't find exactly what I'm looking for, so if this is answered elsewhere, please feel free to direct me to the thread!

    Without the background story because we'd be here all day, I recently ordered Equishure for my mare. It came yesterday, and with it came a product insert (I ordered in via SmartPaks).

    Ingredients:
    Monoglycerides
    Sodium Bicarbonate
    Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil

    Guaranteed Analysis:
    Fat Min. 35%
    Sodium Min. 25%


    So....is Equishure essentially just baking soda blended with a solidified fat source to make a granular powder?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  2. #2
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    No, it also had monoglycerides, which are emulsifiers... LOL

    I had no idea but I am glad I tried the baking soda route with my mare before spending money on Equishure. And it did the trick so she has been on it since!



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCMSL View Post
    No, it also had monoglycerides, which are emulsifiers... LOL
    I thought the word "blended" took care of the monoglycerides! LOL!


    I had no idea but I am glad I tried the baking soda route with my mare before spending money on Equishure. And it did the trick so she has been on it since!
    I am thinking that if I see a difference in my mare on the EquiShure, I will just switch to baking soda and a probiotic.

    How much baking soda do you feed?

    The EquiShure recommends 10g/100kg of body weight so that's about 55 grams for a 1000 lb horse. The SmartPak dose comes as 60 grams (which looks to be approximately 3 to 4 tablespoons). I realize that there are "other" ingredients in the EquiShure, but I was thinking the baking soda equivalent could be fed around 50 grams of baking soda.

    Thoughts?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  4. #4
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    Default

    We gave baking soda to our jumpers in Brazil in the late 80's. It was believed to be helpful but wasn't very tasty. Maybe this is tasty baking soda


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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Discobold View Post
    We gave baking soda to our jumpers in Brazil in the late 80's. It was believed to be helpful but wasn't very tasty. Maybe this is tasty baking soda
    I can vouch for it not being very tasty. I have acid reflux and ulcer issues myself, and we didn't have any tums at home. I got severe heartburn one night after eating fried foods and drinking a beer...the only thing I had in the house to take that woudl work quickly was baking soda, so I mixed a tablespoon with warm water...OMG...BLECK! But, my mare will eat tablesalt in her feed, and baking soda is salty, so I think she'd eat it fine.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  6. #6
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    Default

    What is it for?



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koniucha View Post
    What is it for?
    "Hindgut buffer to decrease the risk of hindgut acidosis in at risk horses...EquiShure acts to attenuate changes in hindgut pH that may result from fermentation of starches in the hindgut."

    ^ From the EquiShure product information sheet.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  8. #8
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    Upon more digging:

    Unfortunately, feeding
    raw sodium bicarbonate to horses is ineffective because
    of the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract.
    Ideally, the sodium bicarbonate should be protected
    so that it is delivered to the hindgut intact. Kentucky
    Equine Research, in conjunction with Balchem
    Corporation, has recently developed a
    protected sodium bicarbonate (PSB)a that survives
    transit through the stomach and small intestine of
    the horse.
    From this research from KER.

    Interesting...so, what protects it, the hydrogenated vegetable oil?
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  9. #9
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    "Levels of sodium bicarbonate used to produce a metabolic alkalosis generally
    range from 0.3 to 0.6 g/kg body weight."

    So, for a 1000 lb horse that would be about 136 grams of sodium bicarbonate.

    1000 lb = 455 kg horse
    .3g/kg = .3*455 = 136.5 grams
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  10. #10
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    I believe it is coated or protected somehow to make sure the bicarb doesn't get "released" until it's in the hindgut, no?

    Still, yeah, nothing majikal about it.
    Click here before you buy.



  11. #11
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    I would rather approach hindgut acidosis by trying to prevent it in the first place... it happens because of excessive starch fermentation by hindgut bacteria, a result of which is lactic acid. If you don't have too much starch in your horse's diet, then that big change in the hindgut will be less likely to happen. Probiotics/digestive enzymes can help prevent acidosis while keeping the hindgut in balance.

    I don't know anyone who feeds baking soda, but I would think that if it weren't coated, it may raise stomach pH if fed in a high enough amount. While this may help with preventing ulcers, the stomach is acidic for a reason and a pH change could affect digestion in the stomach.

    In general, different areas of the body have particular pHs (is this the plural of "pH"? lol) for a reason. Hindgut acidosis is definitely a problem, but it's usually a result of another problem (i.e. high NSC feed).

    But if it works for you and your ponies, great! I would be curious as to what their coating is, but it seems that a coated sodium bicarb product would work differently than plain baking soda because of when it would begin to act in the body.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    I believe it is coated or protected somehow to make sure the bicarb doesn't get "released" until it's in the hindgut, no?

    Still, yeah, nothing majikal about it.
    That's what they say.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie.S View Post
    I would rather approach hindgut acidosis by trying to prevent it in the first place... it happens because of excessive starch fermentation by hindgut bacteria, a result of which is lactic acid. If you don't have too much starch in your horse's diet, then that big change in the hindgut will be less likely to happen. Probiotics/digestive enzymes can help prevent acidosis while keeping the hindgut in balance.

    I don't know anyone who feeds baking soda, but I would think that if it weren't coated, it may raise stomach pH if fed in a high enough amount. While this may help with preventing ulcers, the stomach is acidic for a reason and a pH change could affect digestion in the stomach.

    In general, different areas of the body have particular pHs (is this the plural of "pH"? lol) for a reason. Hindgut acidosis is definitely a problem, but it's usually a result of another problem (i.e. high NSC feed).

    But if it works for you and your ponies, great! I would be curious as to what their coating is, but it seems that a coated sodium bicarb product would work differently than plain baking soda because of when it would begin to act in the body.
    Understood. My mare had gastric ulcers, which we scope to diagnose, treated, and scoped to be sure they were healed. Since then, she is still NQR off and on for no apparent reason. This is an emperical trial to see if the EquiShure makes any difference. But if it did make a difference, I was looking to see if there was a "generic" that I could concoct on my own and save some $$$.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  14. #14
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    But, its my understanding that hindgut acidosis doesn't just come from high starch feeds. It can also be triggered by administration of NSAIDS, and I'm sure, a plethora of other things we don't know about yet, as with every equine-related condition, LOL!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  15. #15
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    Very true, everything with horses is a delicate balance that can seemingly be upset by anything, no matter how many carefully thought out supplements we try to throw at them! lol


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  16. #16
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    How do NSAIDs change gut pH?
    Click here before you buy.


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  17. #17
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    Your "raw" bicarbonate will be neutralized long before it reaches the hindgut. You will neutralize stomach acid. I imagine that all of the Equishure doesn't make it unscathed, either.
    If you Google "milkshakes" for horses you'll get lots of info on people feeding baking soda. It isn't a good idea.
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    How do NSAIDs change gut pH?
    http://www.ivis.org/proceedings/gene...ohen3/ivis.pdf
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowneDragon View Post
    ...
    If you Google "milkshakes" for horses you'll get lots of info on people feeding baking soda. It isn't a good idea.
    Well, I'm not racing or doing any other sport that tests/has restricted "drugs" and I'm not administering gallons of water mixed with other ingredients via nasal tube, so I'm not overly concerned about orally feeding my horse a few tablespoons of baking soda.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    Well, I'm not racing or doing any other sport that tests/has restricted "drugs" and I'm not administering gallons of water mixed with other ingredients via nasal tube, so I'm not overly concerned about orally feeding my horse a few tablespoons of baking soda.
    If you are trying to increase colonic pH, feeding a few tablespoons of baking soda isn't going to do anything.
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



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