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  1. #21
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    Jun. 16, 2001
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    Los Angeles, California
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    Not to play devils advocate but there are threads bemoaning the fate of staving seized horses and just underneith (not now- but it was) a thread bemoaning the lack of hay to feed the horses.

    Think the two just might be connected?

    Perhaps if there were an alternate feed market it might help the problem?

    I know that a lot of potential hay is plowed under on city/county/government owned land for fire abatement. It could be baled/pelleted as the lowest end of hay. It's there it is a hazard if left and grass eating animals can live on it. Why waste it?
    The Denver Broncos went to visit an orphanage. "It's so sad looking into their faces so devoid of hope." Sara aged 6



  2. #22
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    The hay post was just a pretense to yank someone's chain.

    However, in most of the hoarder situations, access to hay (or money) isn't usually the problem...but not all of them. Sometimes the hoarder just can't see the forest for the trees.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


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  3. #23
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    Jan. 20, 2012
    Location
    Calgary, AB
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    121

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    There we actually 58 horses seized:

    "The 58 malnourished horses — described as “next to being wild” — were seized from a property near Raymond on Feb. 11. They didn’t have access to food or water.

    Five were put down for medical reasons and another 19 were euthanized after a third party assessment deemed them too dangerous to be sold to the public."

    Most of the 19 that were euthanized were stallions.

    Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/al...#ixzz2Q51mMWLA

    There is no hay shortage in southern Alberta. Anyone who wanted to "rescue" a horse could have gone to the auction. It was well publicized. The horses are better off whereever they end up than where they came from. I don't hold any ill will towards the SPCA for how they handled it.


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  4. #24
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    Jun. 16, 2001
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    Los Angeles, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by saffire_100 View Post
    The horses are better off whereever they end up than where they came from. I don't hold any ill will towards the SPCA for how they handled it.

    True, there are worse things than death.
    Slow starvation being one of them.

    However for horses in need I think we are overlooking a resource that needs to be managed for fire abatement and if bailing/pelleting equipment were not available and enough drinking water was trucked in with a littler temporary e-fencing it could be a win-win for both parties. 10% of SoCal goes up in flames every three years due to firebugs so perhaps letting the grass grow wild might not be the best idea.
    The Denver Broncos went to visit an orphanage. "It's so sad looking into their faces so devoid of hope." Sara aged 6



  5. #25
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    Aug. 25, 2007
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    For all y'all who are right horrified at this you had a chance to stop it: go to the auction and buy the horses. Then do with them as you will.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    I may have been wrong at first glance about this. It really depends on whether the SPCA is fundraising as a rescue or if they are operating as animal control or a county funded animal shelter. I have two different expectations for each.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


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  7. #27
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    Feb. 15, 2004
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    Ontario
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    the only positive I can think of for these horses ... they were at the s/h door, so no long travel for them! Still, I have lost all faith and confidence in the SPCA when it comes to large animals, mostly here in Ontario.



  8. #28
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    Jul. 1, 2011
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    I think they did the best they could. Who could afford to keep supporting this many horses, most of which could not be used even if someone came forward to adopt/purchase them. Clearly, they tried, but for all the claims of folks who think it is just a matter of getting them into homes, the 'homes' clearly are not there!



  9. #29
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    Aug. 5, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5 View Post
    True, there are worse things than death.
    Slow starvation being one of them.

    However for horses in need I think we are overlooking a resource that needs to be managed for fire abatement and if bailing/pelleting equipment were not available and enough drinking water was trucked in with a littler temporary e-fencing it could be a win-win for both parties. 10% of SoCal goes up in flames every three years due to firebugs so perhaps letting the grass grow wild might not be the best idea.
    Believe it or not, most hay growers try to eradicate poisonous species in their hayfields so they are not selling toxic feed for livestock.

    Many roadside or 'waste place' plants, including those scattered by municipalities to beautify their landscape are toxic to horses and baling or pelletizing tends to reduce the selectivity that grazing animals exhibit. Not to mention pesticide and herbicide applications. I think Oleander is common in So. Cal -and very deadly.

    My own locale decided lupines would look great - and the seeds travel into pastures annually and must be grubbed out. One poor soul did bale it up and fed it - with predictably disastrous results.
    http://www.understanding-horse-nutri...om/lupine.html

    I'd want to look very carefully at that type of offering.


    a sample list
    http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex13353



  10. #30
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    Dec. 21, 2008
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    Missouri
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    Where were all these outraged people when the horses were first brought in? Did they provide money for their rehabilitation? Were they lining up to offer good homes once they were healthy enough to be adopted? The majority of horses seized from farms should be euthanized on the spot and the money used to rehab the ones worth saving.



  11. #31
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    Mar. 1, 2007
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    Canada
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    Society for the PREVENTION OF CRUELTY to animals. That is their NAME and thus their mission should be fairly obvious. So please explain to me how sending animals through the auction mart to be shipped to slaughter is preventing cruelty??? And why in God's name waste a bunch of money feeding them up before subjecting them to such a fate??
    www.svhanoverians.com

    "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.


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  12. #32
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donella View Post
    Society for the PREVENTION OF CRUELTY to animals. That is their NAME and thus their mission should be fairly obvious. So please explain to me how sending animals through the auction mart to be shipped to slaughter is preventing cruelty??? And why in God's name waste a bunch of money feeding them up before subjecting them to such a fate??
    Maybe because not everyone agrees that auction and slaughter are inherently cruel?

    While you can find abuses there, as you can find in any other place, even the fanciest barn or most active rescues, that doesn't mean, because of some abuses, they are then all of them "cruel".

    You have been listening to too much animal rights extremist propaganda if you think so.


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  13. #33
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    Don't think for one minute this doesn't happen in the US, too!

    My "rescued" TWH was seized as an underfed 3-year-old by the State of Arkansas, rehabilitated, but as the market had hit bottom and he wasn't even broke the State was about to dispose of him at an auction and he'd have wound up in Mexico if a wonderful trainer hadn't spotted him and called me. I made his bail and now have one of the standout nice horses of my lifetime.

    Plenty of back-door-ing happens to horses donated to disabled riding programs (yep, I've got one of those, too) and the ones you give to vet schools. Eyes open, folks!


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  14. #34
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    Jul. 1, 2011
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    Oh, it does happen in the U.S. People will make a buck where they can. Look at the Leachman horses. After 2 years they are still being sold to slaughter. 9 more are headed to Bouvry now.

    http://billingsgazette.com/news/loca...551b11237.html



  15. #35
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    Oh, it does happen in the U.S. People will make a buck where they can. Look at the Leachman horses. After 2 years they are still being sold to slaughter. 9 more are headed to Bouvry now.

    http://billingsgazette.com/news/loca...551b11237.html



  16. #36
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    They DID have an "adopt-a-thon." It was just called an auction. For an adoption fee of less than $300 (probably less than $100) any one of Keely's buddies could have taken one of these horses. That's less than what most rescues charge, and no annoying forms to fill out
    yup. Where do you expect these horses to go? clearly no one wants them or they would have shown up at the auction and taken them home. Generally the accepted solution is to kill the unwanted animals. They get killed at slaughter, they get killed by the ASPCA, not much difference there. A fast death is better than starvation.



  17. #37
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    Aug. 26, 2008
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    I may have been wrong at first glance about this. It really depends on whether the SPCA is fundraising as a rescue or if they are operating as animal control or a county funded animal shelter. I have two different expectations for each. .
    The SPCA is animal control and provides shelter for seized animals on behald of the Province, in certain circumstances. Many communities in Alberta do not have a separate Pound/SPCA, they are the same facility. The big cities have a little bit more separation for small animals (usually a pound, with a strict, short duration limit) that feeds to the SPCA Shelter. The SPCA then acts as an adoption agency to rehome unclaimed or surrendered animals.

    In a seizure, yes, the SPCA MUST hold the animals until the owner is heard in court (or else waives that right) as they are evidence and there is a possibility that the owner will not be found guilty. It is very expensive. In some cases, like the Rescue 100 Arabian seizure, the SPCA allowed a private foundation to assume care over the seized animals and the Rescue 100 Foundation acted as a private charity.

    There are very few legitimate horse rescue organizations in Alberta, Rescue 100 is rare. So the SPCA ends up having to find ways to care for seized livestock. It isn't efficient. If the owner surrenders the animals or they are denied ownership rights as part of a sentence, the SPCA has to treat the animals according to their policies AND MEANS. They can't house them forever. Auctions are a way to try and get them placed with owners (and auctions around here don't generally charge anywhere NEAR what American rescue groups charge for "adoption" btw, the meat buyers don't engage in bidding wars.)

    Direct the anger at the right place. The owners who neglected the animals. The SPCA doesn't deserve the criticism here, the auctions are public. If there were really homes all over the place that wanted these horses, all the humans had to do was drive a truck to the publically-announced auction and pay a few hundred dollars. The reality is that the auctions in Alberta are full of largely UNwanted horses. It's sad. Many are slaughtered. I don't feel that slaughter is inherently cruel.

    Incidentally, if I were interested in providing a home for a seized/surrendered horse, I would ONLY do so at an auction. I have HAD IT with the ridiculous contracts and rules that Animal Rescue Groups try to impose on people. I had planned to adopt a shelter dog, but ended up buying a puppy off a farm instead. Honestly, I love animals, but no Animal Rescue Zealot has the right to treat me like a second-class citizen because I want to adopt an unwanted animal. And sorry, once I take ownership, you don't have ANY rights to come into my life and check up on the animal. My attitude is pretty common in Alberta, to be honest. People are much more likely to take on an extra mouth to feed if it doesn't have strings attached, and nothing turns Albertans away faster than some prying, know-it-all, sanctimonious "horse rescue girl."
    Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior


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  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
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    Alberta
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    I agree with Rugbygirl and just want to add that the SPCA has an obligation to try to recover their costs by selling the horses at market value just like a boarding barn that puts a lien on a horse for non-payment. Offering them at a public sale is the best way for them to prove that they are selling them at the highest value the market will bare.

    Really though, if these horses were pretty much feral, I have trouble feeling any more horrified at them going to a feed lot than I would if it was a herd of cows.

    Unstarted but registered and handled horses an be found for under $600 without the PITA requirements rescues attach to their "sales". It just wouldn't make sense for a rescue to take this group on.
    Freeing worms from cans everywhere!



  19. #39
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    Sep. 11, 2008
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    Snohomish, WA
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    Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by maunder View Post
    There are many people who take what these people say very seriously, including ME. Please stop referring to people who don't agree with you as RARAs as it truly doesn't help your case.


    2 members found this post helpful.

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