The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 47
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,650

    Default

    I guess I'll be the only one to ask...

    Why change what's working? You said everything is perfect. And you want to change it. Why?
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheJenners View Post
    I guess I'll be the only one to ask...

    Why change what's working? You said everything is perfect. And you want to change it. Why?
    I don't want to change perfect. I want it to stay perfect but I would love for the poor guys (2) to be able to enjoy some of this pasture we have. Seems such a waste.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2007
    Posts
    902

    Default

    Sorry, nothing to add except I giggled when I read "blubber horse"..


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default


    It really is a pretty good description of the way she was.
    The people on this list were a wonderful help getting me to see that I was really not starving her to death when I made the diet changes. Oh...I suffered.
    My poor darling was not getting all the hay she wanted. No grass, no grain, no rice bran. It was so sad.
    Doesn't bother me at all now.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2012
    Posts
    306

    Default

    She looks good! My horse WILL NOT let me put the muzzle on if she is a field. I dont blame her. No amount of chasing will work.

    However, she comes in to eat. So, she wears the muzzle out in the field and when she comes in to eat, she get the muzzle off. Once she is done, I put it back on in the stall and then put her out. There is no on 12 hours, off 12 hours because I will not catch her if its not on. She's smart. So, she wears it 24/7 and stays healthy.

    Also, because she is so hard to deal with, I have the muzzle that attaches to a leather halter. I actually take the muzzle off so she is still wearing the halter while she is eating. Otherwise, she spins and tries to pin me in the corner of her stall when the muzzle comes out. If she has a halter on, I usually dont have any problem hiding the muzzle behind my back and getting a good grip on the halter before she has time to spin.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,763

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Not if you implement a cribbing strap as part of the apparatus. Saved me from the clever Shetland's machinations--she now CAN NOT get it off, and I've even been able to loosen the muzzle/halter apparatus slightly from around her face. I fasten an old stirrup leather to the crown piece and tape it in place, then buckle it around her neck just like a cribbing strap--no more pulling it off over her face! Her rolling and rubbing her head on the ground will occasionally free one ear, but the muzzle stays on.
    Do you have photos of this set up?



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    Here is a link to a thread from last year where I spell out my construction of the gadget, and a link to a FB photo. Can't access it from here but hopefully the link still works to the picture.

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...t=muzzle+strap
    Click here before you buy.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,763

    Default

    Thanks Deltawave. Link in that thread worked. I totally get it now. I was having a hard time picturing it before.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
    Posts
    7,234

    Default

    Pretty green fields make owners feel all warm and fuzzy and look pretty--and really cut down on feeding, stall cleaning, and hay throwing!--but they honestly make me cringe unless mowed like a golf course and dotted with hay piles.

    I see waaaay too many obese-but-vitamin/mineral deficient horses, laminitic horses, crumbly-walled-from-standing-in-wet-grass horses..... You want great feet and healthy horses? A nice big dry dirt lot with all the manure picked up and bunches of hay in a slow feeder net so they won't get bored. (appallingly labor intensive). Horses do not care if they don't look like a postcard picture.

    Jennifer


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2013
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    95

    Default

    We had a fat pony that lives out on a round bale with a group, to limit his hay intake he wore a muzzle half-time, and we just taped it to a good fitting leather halter and never had trouble with him getting it off.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,189

    Default

    I guess I'll be the dissenter and say why not just try a few hours of turnout, sans muzzle, and see how it goes? If you have that available to you (a lot of barns won't turnout for just a little while if all the others are out all day), I'd say it's worth a try.
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Longing to be where I once was.....
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Evidence that humans are not difficult to train.

    My pony comes trotting to have her muzzle put on because she knows it means she's going out to grass and that's the ONLY way it's going to happen.
    I guess I should have had your pony talk to my mare because she couldn't put the connection together!! I no longer have a pasture so I don't have to worry any longer. I would bring her up to the stall and I could not get close to her to get it on? It wasn't rubbing her and it just got worse every day. I guess I was easy to train!!



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Longing to be where I once was.....
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pj View Post
    I don't want to change perfect. I want it to stay perfect but I would love for the poor guys (2) to be able to enjoy some of this pasture we have. Seems such a waste.
    Can you cut it for hay before turning them out on it? if you kept it mowed also that would help . I guess I am not understanding the connection between her grazing and having bad feet?



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by candyappy View Post
    Can you cut it for hay before turning them out on it? if you kept it mowed also that would help . I guess I am not understanding the connection between her grazing and having bad feet?
    From what I have been told too many sugars/starches will effect hooves even though the horse doesn't founder.

    Now whether it was way lowering sugars, etc. or if it was adding the CA trace or whether it was simply getting so much blubber off of her I don't know but something changed her feet from really crappy to wonderful and I so want to keep it that way. That's the reason I'm really scared to change anything But I did so much hard work on our pastures over the last forty five years I hate to see them just go to waste.

    I "guess" I could get a cow.

    We've got two old old goats and those boogers won't even go out to pasture.
    They prefer to lay around and have all their food brought to them.

    Mowing short helps? I misunderstood that then. I thought that stressed the grass and stressed grass was the worse.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    8,189

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pj View Post
    From what I have been told too many sugars/starches will effect hooves even though the horse doesn't founder.

    Now whether it was way lowering sugars, etc. or if it was adding the CA trace or whether it was simply getting so much blubber off of her I don't know but something changed her feet from really crappy to wonderful and I so want to keep it that way. That's the reason I'm really scared to change anything But I did so much hard work on our pastures over the last forty five years I hate to see them just go to waste.

    I "guess" I could get a cow.

    We've got two old old goats and those boogers won't even go out to pasture.
    They prefer to lay around and have all their food brought to them.

    Mowing short helps? I misunderstood that then. I thought that stressed the grass and stressed grass was the worse.
    I see the problem here. You obviously are in need of a hard keeper or two.

    Get thee to the sale barn!
    Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
    Posts
    6,182

    Default

    I'll say it for you PJ. Your plan sounds fine. I really think so, I'm not just saying what you want to hear.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2010
    Location
    Satan's Steam Sauna
    Posts
    626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ActNatural View Post
    She looks good! My horse WILL NOT let me put the muzzle on if she is a field. I dont blame her. No amount of chasing will work.

    However, she comes in to eat. So, she wears the muzzle out in the field and when she comes in to eat, she get the muzzle off. Once she is done, I put it back on in the stall and then put her out. There is no on 12 hours, off 12 hours because I will not catch her if its not on. She's smart. So, she wears it 24/7 and stays healthy.

    Also, because she is so hard to deal with, I have the muzzle that attaches to a leather halter. I actually take the muzzle off so she is still wearing the halter while she is eating. Otherwise, she spins and tries to pin me in the corner of her stall when the muzzle comes out. If she has a halter on, I usually dont have any problem hiding the muzzle behind my back and getting a good grip on the halter before she has time to spin.
    ^This. I am so glad that I got the basket muzzle that attaches to the halter, because there is no way in hell my gelding will let me put the entire "contraption" at once. I have 2 breakaway halters for him, so that I can switch them out when he comes in to eat. So he comes in, and I take the muzzle/halter combo off, put the other breakaway halter on, let him eat his ration balancer, while he's eating I detach & clean off the muzzle, and attach it to the halter after he eats. I do have to attach a lead rope and loop it around his neck prior to attaching the muzzle. Once the lead rope is attached, he knows the jig is up and just stands there w/ a pouty lip while I turn him back into Hannibal Lector.

    Quote Originally Posted by sublimequine View Post
    I guess I'll be the dissenter and say why not just try a few hours of turnout, sans muzzle, and shee how it goes? If you have that available to you (a lot of barns won't turnout for just a little while if all the others are out all day), I'd say it's worth a try.
    Because...
    "Pasture intake by the ponies grazing for three hours without muzzles averaged 0.8 percent (with some eating close to 1 percent) of their bodyweight. This is the equivalent of up to two-thirds of the recommended daily dry matter intake for many ponies on restricted diets."
    from
    http://hoofcare.blogspot.com/2011/06...e-pasture.html

    Quote Originally Posted by candyappy View Post
    Can you cut it for hay before turning them out on it? if you kept it mowed also that would help . I guess I am not understanding the connection between her grazing and having bad feet?
    ^THIS - especially since you've put so much work into the pastures. Ask around for somebody willing to come hay your pastures. Get the hay tested, so that you know if it will be the best option for your horse(s). If the sugar is too high, sell it.

    Quote Originally Posted by pj View Post
    From what I have been told too many sugars/starches will effect hooves even though the horse doesn't founder.
    ...
    Mowing short helps? I misunderstood that then. I thought that stressed the grass and stressed grass was the worse.
    There is a lot of good info at
    http://safergrass.org/articles.html

    Why don't you get your grass tested, then you will know what you are dealing with.

    In my experience, haying doesn't leave the grass really short.

    Ultimately, you just have to guage the risk to your horse. Personally, I'd rather have the grazing muzzle on my guy 24/7 and have him out moving around in the pasture. If the grazing muzzle cuts consumption by 80%, and he is out there 16 - 20 hours a day; I figure he's getting the equivalent of 3-4 hours of grazing.

    I highly recommend FeedXL, which is a great tool for making sure your horse is getting enough forage and nutrition. They also have a very informative blog.

    http://blog.feedxl.com/do-grazing-muzzles-work

    http://feedxl.com/newsletters/11-fee...sy-keeper.html

    Good Luck, OP
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fourmares View Post
    I'll say it for you PJ. Your plan sounds fine. I really think so, I'm not just saying what you want to hear.


    YAY!!! <doing the windex tush up dance>
    A coth first!! Someone said what I wanted them to say.

    Thank you. Even if I don't end up doing this <singing> someone said what I wanted them tooooo.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,242

    Default

    Thank you for finding that study, ldaziens! I knew it was out there but could NOT place my finger on it.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2005
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    I didn't mean for it sound as if we had acres and acres of pasture. There is only 6-1/2 to 7 acres of actual pasture but it's good pasture which was thick wood land when I first bought it. No heavy equipment here so I've worked really hard on it.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 22
    Last Post: Jan. 3, 2013, 09:06 AM
  2. Doggie dental, hold my hand please
    By Slewdledo in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Oct. 25, 2012, 10:05 PM
  3. Hold my hand ......
    By Weese in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Aug. 6, 2010, 09:22 AM
  4. Replies: 41
    Last Post: Oct. 13, 2009, 08:13 PM
  5. HOLD MY HAND!!!!!! Dystocia! Jingles needed 4 # 2!
    By Iron Horse Farm in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 113
    Last Post: May. 19, 2009, 06:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness