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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2006
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    Maryland
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    Default What to do with very nice mare

    I could use a few suggestions on what to do with my mare. I have a 3 yr old mare by Redwine out of a nice hunter champion TB mare. My mare is registered Oldenburg. She is a very nice mover and was bought to be my 3'-3'6" hunter possible derby horse. Right after I bought her I had a riding injury that is going to limit my future riding levels. I now am never going to compete above 2'6" again and have lost my desire to work with a baby/green horse. My trainer feels I should sell my mare. My question is how to go about it. Mare hasn't had anything done with her other then basic daily stuff (grooming, blanketing, etc). Should I send her to trainers for a month to get her longing and started then put her up for sale? Should I sell her now without a month of training? Should I spend the $$ for a few months of training and sell her for a higher price? I was planning on selling her now for around the $10,000-$15,000 range. Would potential buyers want something that has already had 30 days training? Any input would be appreciated.
    Happy Hour-TB
    Cowboy Casanova - Brandenburg
    Isadora - Palomino TB



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
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    4,612

    Default

    I think 30 days is for me, personally, sort of a sweet spot. The horse has enough education that I can try it or see it do some of the things I'd like it to do (ie be ridden on the flat or maybe try a small jump) and I can get an idea of the attitude under saddle, but the horse hasn't had so much training that it's, well, messed up.

    Additionally, having a horse be at a well-connected trainer's barn can help you get a higher price with the same amount of training vs selling yourself. In the past I have done "sales horse board" which is basically 30 days of training and includes cleaning up and marketing the horse.

    I would say yes, send her off for at least 30 days to give buyers a little more to work with-- you'll almost assuredly get the $$ back in a higher sales price.

    Especially now with WEF ending and people coming back for the summer circuits, a lot of shopping is going on now.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
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    6,379

    Default

    If I were shopping, I'd buy her just as she is for the 10 - 15K.
    After someone else's 30 days, probably not so much <shrug>

    But really, if you like her, keep her for yourself, you deserve a nice horse to ride the 2 6's with
    If you have limited funds but are able to pay horse's expenses, find an up & coming young rider to develop her for the next couple of years & then take her back for yourself or sell her for a lot more


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    87

    Default

    I'm very sorry to hear about your injury!

    Adding 30 days undersaddle training would definitely open up your options on buyers. The amount of people with the experience and desire to buy a young horse is already a small pool but if they are at least green-backed you will have a lot more potential buyers. If she's sweet on the ground and responds well to the training, I would think $20k would be a reasonable asking price. You certainly won't spend $5k on a month of training, so that's a good investment. Plus sending her to a trainer will expose her to potential new buyers.

    I hope the mare finds a good home and you find a horse that suits your new goals better.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
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    PA
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    Default

    Buglet, I’m SO sorry about your riding injury. I’m in a similar situation, but because of different circumstances. What I’m doing with my 3 YO is having 30 days put on her. If she *really* surprises me with every step of the starting process with how solid of a citizen she is (and she has so far), then I may end up keeping her. But the prospect of getting on anything *that green* just scares me right now, despite how good of a girl she is. So, I completely understand where you’re coming from and I sympathize with you.

    It sounds like your young mare is *very* lovely and I’m sure she’ll sell to a great home. Best of luck to you!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2012
    Location
    Virginia
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    Default

    OP- First and foremost, determine how much you love this horse. Is she your "baby"? Second are you able to afford her? If the answer to both of those is yes, then why not keep her for yourself. Who cares if you can't do above 2'6" again. I had a nasty back injury many years ago and was told I couldn't ride again because it could be detrimental. Being the stubborn mule I am I said "to hell with that" and decided I was riding, just would take it slow. I knew I loved riding and jumping, I just also learned to know my limits. I will never do a hunter derby or be a modified jumper. I can only handle 2'6" on occassion. I have a horse that is too good to do nothing but I decided that I loved that horse so I stuck with him and he was just as happy as a pig in mud to stick with lower things. I let other riders do the bigger things with him.

    My current horse has the potential to be a great jumper, possibly eventer. I know I can't do but so much but instead of selling this horse now knowing his potential I'm keeping him. If the fact that she is so green broke is what intimidates you then it is understandable to move on. If it is because you feel like she is too good for you, you are WRONG!!! I highly doubt she trots around the field saying "my sire is Redwine and I'm just too good to do nothing". Horses don't think that way, HUMANS DO!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2013
    Posts
    176

    Default

    If you like her, and can afford her.. keep her!

    Do small stuff, and have a pro show her in the bigger stuff. After a few years you may have something worth much more and then you may decide to sell her for an enticing amount of money.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
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    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
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    2,936

    Default

    I'm going to echo the keep hers if you like her enough and can afford her. The horse doesn't know she's jumping 2'6 when she's "supposed" to be jumping 3'6+. Put her in full training until she's at a point where you feel comfortable on her, then enjoy!

    If keeping her isn't an option due to whatever constraints, though I'm no expert/pro, I'd still put 30 days on her. As others have said, people like to see what a horses potential is at 3. You can tell a lot from a basic flat session and free jumping, or hopping over a small jump or two. She'll get more exposure if she's at a training/sales barn too.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
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    1,240

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Buglet View Post
    I could use a few suggestions on what to do with my mare. I have a 3 yr old mare by Redwine out of a nice hunter champion TB mare. My mare is registered Oldenburg. She is a very nice mover and was bought to be my 3'-3'6" hunter possible derby horse. Right after I bought her I had a riding injury that is going to limit my future riding levels. I now am never going to compete above 2'6" again and have lost my desire to work with a baby/green horse. My trainer feels I should sell my mare. My question is how to go about it. Mare hasn't had anything done with her other then basic daily stuff (grooming, blanketing, etc). Should I send her to trainers for a month to get her longing and started then put her up for sale? Should I sell her now without a month of training? Should I spend the $$ for a few months of training and sell her for a higher price? I was planning on selling her now for around the $10,000-$15,000 range. Would potential buyers want something that has already had 30 days training? Any input would be appreciated.
    You could do what a lot of people do - you could place a thinly veiled sales ad on a horse bulletin board that doesn't allow advertising, and just wait for the PMs to start pouring in. Doesn't cost you a dime!

    I'm trying to think of what type of injury would result in a doctor telling you you will be able to jump up to 2'6", but no higher, and surprisingly I'm not coming up with anything.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2012
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    Virginia
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    285

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    Quote Originally Posted by ynl063w View Post
    You could do what a lot of people do - you could place a thinly veiled sales ad on a horse bulletin board that doesn't allow advertising, and just wait for the PMs to start pouring in. Doesn't cost you a dime!

    I'm trying to think of what type of injury would result in a doctor telling you you will be able to jump up to 2'6", but no higher, and surprisingly I'm not coming up with anything.
    Harsh! Since we don't know the OPs entire story, we shouldn't make accusations. Not all posts on COTH are that transparent either. And unless you have MD behind your name and have examined the patient in order to determine a diagnosis and future, you probably shouldn't assume.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2006
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    Maryland
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    Default

    ynl063w - the injury was actually a shattered arm that now has both the radius and ulna plated and pinned back together. Only about 50% mobility in wrist and hand. Dr said if arm or wrist gets broken again then there will be zero use of hand. I find that most horses can get themselves out of trouble when jumping 2'6" if rider makes a mistake. It's a lot harder for them to heave themselves over a 3' oxer if they get to a bad distance. At this point in my life I would much rather take it down a level and not risk perminantly losing use of my hand.
    I don't have to sell her. I own my own barn and don't mind hanging on to her, just not sure how confident I will feel riding a baby. I have another horse to show so I don't need to sell her in order to buy a new horse.
    I honestly was trying to figure out if people would prefer a horse that has already had some sort or under saddle training
    Happy Hour-TB
    Cowboy Casanova - Brandenburg
    Isadora - Palomino TB


    9 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anmoro View Post
    Harsh! Since we don't know the OPs entire story, we shouldn't make accusations. Not all posts on COTH are that transparent either. And unless you have MD behind your name and have examined the patient in order to determine a diagnosis and future, you probably shouldn't assume.
    Please quote the part of my previous post where I assumed something about the injury.

    Quote Originally Posted by Buglet
    I honestly was trying to figure out if people would prefer a horse that has already had some sort or under saddle training
    If that were the only information you were looking for, you could have gotten it without telling us that you have a three year old registered Oldenburg mare by Redwine out of a nice hunter champion TB mare that you can't ride to the level for which you bought her because you've suffered an injury and what oh what should you do to sell her (you didn't even mention the idea of keeping her in your OP). All you had to do was ask if people would prefer to buy a horse that has already had some sort of under saddle training over one that hasn't.

    I think I'm almost as tired of this type of thread as vxf111 is tired of the Parlanti boot threads.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
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    3,001

    Default

    ynl063w - I posted a very general thread and got very few responses because people wanted specifics in order to give me an answer - and I was being *very* careful as to how I worded things so as *not* to come across as a sales ad.

    I will give Buglet the benefit of the doubt as it also sounds like Buglet is a little bummed about the whole situation and is trying to figure out what to do.

    Buglet, good luck. Why does your trainer want you to sell?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneGrayPony View Post
    ynl063w - I posted a very general thread and got very few responses because people wanted specifics in order to give me an answer - and I was being *very* careful as to how I worded things so as *not* to come across as a sales ad.

    I will give Buglet the benefit of the doubt as it also sounds like Buglet is a little bummed about the whole situation and is trying to figure out what to do.

    Buglet, good luck. Why does your trainer want you to sell?
    Maybe those who are in need of information regarding the sale of a specific horse should find sources outside of this board for answers to their questions.

    In defense of those who create this type of thread, I have to admit that the moderators don't police this particular rule very closely at all in this forum (as opposed to the breeding forum), so if several people per week get away with it over such a long period of time, I can't blame others for feeling that they should be allowed to get away with it too. I'll give Buglet that excuse over the "poor Buglet, she's bummed; therefore, it's unlikely that she's trying to get the word out that she has a nice horse for sale on a bulletin board that explicitly forbids advertising in its written rules" excuse any day.

    No one will convince me that someone who posted the level of detail that is present in the original post intended to simply find out if prospective buyers prefer a horse with thirty days under saddle to one that does not. And no one will convince me that the OP isn't going to get a whole lot of PMs from people who are interested in her horse based on the level of detail provided.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
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    Default

    Buyers do prefer horses that have been started under saddle. However, it also opens the door to some issues. There are some trainers and potential buyers out there that DO know how to ride a horse with 30 days training and what to reasonably expect from it...but there are also a lot who don't. I hate selling horses at the "30 days" stage because there are so many people out there who want to push the horse too much when they come try it or who really aren't appropriately experienced to be wanting to ride a very green horse. At this stage having a bad experience can set a young horse back a bit, not usually the end of the world but just frustrating. I also hate having strangers come out and ride 30 day broke babies because of liability concerns. These aren't insurmountable issues, just food for thought.



  16. #16

    Default

    Personally, as a breeder of hunter prospects and as a seller, I think selling a horse that is green broke is a lot easier than a 3 YO that isn't broke to ride.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
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    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
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    9,621

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    Most people probably want something they can sit on before they buy it so they have a better idea of trainability, what the gaits feel like, and so on. Some people will buy them unstarted. Why not do an ad that describes what you have now and indicates you'll be putting her into training and that the price will increase with training. Then edit the ad and photos and price as she progresses in her training.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2006
    Location
    Maryland
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    Default

    Thanks guys for the helpful suggestions. I think I am going to send her to trainers for 30 days and go from there. If it turns out that she is quiet and well behaved then I may just keep her for myself as a 2'6" horse and let trainer show her in the bigger stuff. If she is gonna be too much horse for me then I will sell her after the 30 days. Part of the reason I mentioned her bloodlines is because I know that I personally would by a prospect that has been unstarted if it had good breeding and movement (hence why I bought her in the first place). If the horse didn't have good bloodlines for a specific discipline or was from a stallion without a good performance/show record I would want to see the horse go under saddle before I would buy it. Everyone has a different way of looking at things, but that's just me.
    Happy Hour-TB
    Cowboy Casanova - Brandenburg
    Isadora - Palomino TB



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
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    1,711

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    Who cares if she has the talent to do more than you can do? If she's a nice ride, you like her personality and riding her, keep her and show her yourself. If you *really* feel like she should do more in the future, I bet there will be someone without a horse DYING to show something like your mare above levels you are now comfortable showing.

    My gelding is a nationals quality Arab. Will I EVER show him at that level? Heck no. Do I love him to pieces and have fun doing what we do? Absolutely. I bet he'd rather have the life he leads with me where he's my buddy, gets to live like a horse, trail ride and do a variety of things than to be locked in a stall leading the life of a typical halter stallion (I gelded him).



  20. #20

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    I'm really surprised that no one has suggested this yet, but why not trade her for a 2'-2'6 steady eddy horse? This way, if someone has a nice, lower level packer, you don't have to worry and then your mare can be used to her full potential. That's actually what I am looking for. I have a great 2'6 mare that packs around a 12 year old in the limits and previously the shorties that I need to trade or sell at the end of this show season so I can move up to the Adult Ammy and the following year to the A/Os.
    I'm so sorry to hear about your injury. If you decide that you want to trade, send me your email and maybe we can chat? My email is hmcin246@gmail.com
    Good luck with whatever you decide!
    ~Heather



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