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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
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    Virginia
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    1,354

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    I may have been using the ECP then because the vet mentioned to me that it shouldn't be used on mares - its been quite a few years though so don't remember.

    The horse I had blistered was very out of shape due to rehab for an injury when we did it but went right into a conditioning program so the post injury status of the OP's horse might not be a deal breaker if she wants to go that route. Also, he didn't seem to be any more uncomfortable than if we had injected a joint - I would go that way again if the vet recommended it.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2011
    Posts
    798

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    Hill work, walking cavaletti to small x's, transitions, forcing mare to stand square in the washrack, squaring hind feet and adding rollers to the hind shoes 100% stopped my mares toe dragging and greatly improved her mild stifle locking.

    Estrone is next on my list, but I am holding off until this regimine doesn't work for her. My vet also won't blister stifles. There was a thread a while back about someone who blistered her hores's stifles and the horse had problems recovering (ie. a lot of pain, IIRC, it couldn't walk or something along those lines).


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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2003
    Location
    Baldwin, MD
    Posts
    617

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    I think it would be helpful to get a good set of rads on your horse's stifles, plus an ultrasound from someone experienced with ultrasounding stifles if rads don't show anything. There's lots of ligaments in the stifle (plus the menisci) that can have mild to moderate damage and cause minor/intermittent pain and different manifestations of lameness without any bony changes visible on rads.

    I just attended an ISELP seminar on stifle US where the speaking clinician kept telling us how under-diagnosed stifle ligament injuries are because it's a difficult area to ultrasound well, many vets aren't comfortable/experienced with it, and because these injuries often won't show any radiographic changes. Nuclear scintigraphy is also useful if you still can't find anything. It's often less money to find out what the problem ACTUALLY is than continuing to try treatment after treatment hoping to fix something.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    135

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren12 View Post
    I think it would be helpful to get a good set of rads on your horse's stifles, plus an ultrasound from someone experienced with ultrasounding stifles if rads don't show anything. There's lots of ligaments in the stifle (plus the menisci) that can have mild to moderate damage and cause minor/intermittent pain and different manifestations of lameness without any bony changes visible on rads.

    I just attended an ISELP seminar on stifle US where the speaking clinician kept telling us how under-diagnosed stifle ligament injuries are because it's a difficult area to ultrasound well, many vets aren't comfortable/experienced with it, and because these injuries often won't show any radiographic changes. Nuclear scintigraphy is also useful if you still can't find anything. It's often less money to find out what the problem ACTUALLY is than continuing to try treatment after treatment hoping to fix something.
    Interesting info for sure... she definitely has very clean x rays of her stifles and hocks. No signs of arthritis, bone spurs, chips, etc. This is what has led us to believe it is more of a soft tissue problem. When we injected before, it was due to swelling in the stifles, which had mainly accumulated while she was on stall rest. We were kind of giving her a jump start back into work to make sure everything was comfortable.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    135

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    Quote Originally Posted by ActNatural View Post
    Okay, but have you tried hill work? Theres a big difference in being in jumping shape but only doing flat ring work and getting outside and doing hill work. I wouldnt blister until you try real hill work. I know you are rehabbing the ligament so you'd have to start slow, walking hills, etc.

    Also, 24/7 turnout. Trot poles and lots of them. Trotting X-rails and small verticles. Lateral work once she is strong enough. Squarring the toes.

    I think you have options before you blister. Id do it as last resort.
    I definitely think these are good ideas and will try them once she is sound. Right now she is only allowed to trot flat surfaces, but once begin cantering she may be able to start walking some mild/moderate hills. She is currently almost ready to trot poles, although we are cautioned against it in case she steps on one. I am also looking into changing up her trimming/shoeing to help with the issue. Thank you for all the awesome suggestions... lots of food for thought



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    135

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    Yet another question... if many other things had been tried, and I still needed to take more intensive action... what should be tried first... blistering or the MPL scarring method? Thanks!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Posts
    447

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren12 View Post
    I think it would be helpful to get a good set of rads on your horse's stifles, plus an ultrasound from someone experienced with ultrasounding stifles if rads don't show anything. There's lots of ligaments in the stifle (plus the menisci) that can have mild to moderate damage and cause minor/intermittent pain and different manifestations of lameness without any bony changes visible on rads.

    I just attended an ISELP seminar on stifle US where the speaking clinician kept telling us how under-diagnosed stifle ligament injuries are because it's a difficult area to ultrasound well, many vets aren't comfortable/experienced with it, and because these injuries often won't show any radiographic changes. Nuclear scintigraphy is also useful if you still can't find anything. It's often less money to find out what the problem ACTUALLY is than continuing to try treatment after treatment hoping to fix something.
    Absolutely agree with this. It is much wiser to make sure what's wrong not just guess. It's too much money and time invested trying treatments without knowing. Since it's been an ongoing problem for you, I would suggest that it's time to be pro active and solve the why, not treat the guess.



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