The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 75
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2010
    Posts
    1,660

    Default

    I just had to post this... My neighbor - who is a trail rider - just bought a Quarter Pony for under $1,000! 4 year old, barely started, as cute as can be - not far enough along to see anything under saddle, but she has a lovely walk and decent trot, and is about 14.1. She won't be wowing the Materiale classes, but she might just be a decent prospect, and the price was right!

    She brought her over one day - totally calm, easy going, sweet pony - had never been here before and was unphased by the whole thing. Hopped in and out of the trailer like a seasoned pro.

    She's going to put her in training for a few months over the Summer - who knows, she might have gotten the deal of the century!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2006
    Location
    Nor Cal
    Posts
    1,955

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mbm View Post

    Any well conformed horse or pony can be trained up the levels - as long as the trainer is good enough. So while it is super fun to have fancy gaits - more importantly is to look for individuals that have good walks and good canters - trots can be made. look for something that is a good learner and a good temperament.
    In theory I agree that the trot can be 'improved' but it takes a very good rider to improve 'pony gaited'. Where these 'pony-gaited' individuals tend to fall down is in the extensions/lengthenings and general tendency to fail to cover ground while staying more uphill. Better to start with something with a fair bit of natural 'elasticity'. I personally would tend to look for a cross-bred pony as they tend to be more 'competitive'---if that is the goal.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2013
    Posts
    155

    Default

    OP, has your friend done any searches on the sale horse websites? One of the girls I ride with is shopping for a new horse. She's a good rider, but has a limited budget. Because vicarious horse shopping is almost as much fun as actually shopping for a horse, I did some surfing on Warmbloods for Sale with her in mind. Not only are there some nice ponies and crossbred horses, but there are even some nicely bred warmbloods in the 15-15'2 range being offered for less than $10,000.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,238

    Default

    Well I just dropped off my 15 year old section D cob for someone who is going to lease him with an option to buy. So this is not a sales ad at all. The agreement is for her to lease to see if they're going to be good for each other (limited time so basically a trial) and then the price is $8500. He is 15 BUT/AND SOUND, very sound. He earned my silver medal for me and can do the same for someone else if they are a decent rider. He could easily earn the bronze for just about anyone. His gaits overall are usually scored a 6 but he regularly receives 7-8s on his medium gaits. He's not an uber mover and the biggest rub is he's not built for the sport; but, he has a heart of gold. They are out there. The individual looking just has to network, network network. So mbm is right.
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,538

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goodpony View Post
    In theory I agree that the trot can be 'improved' but it takes a very good rider to improve 'pony gaited'. Where these 'pony-gaited' individuals tend to fall down is in the extensions/lengthenings and general tendency to fail to cover ground while staying more uphill. Better to start with something with a fair bit of natural 'elasticity'. I personally would tend to look for a cross-bred pony as they tend to be more 'competitive'---if that is the goal.
    i guess the question is: what are your goals? is it to have fun, learn and enjoy this sport and your pony and show along the way ? or is it to do all those things and be super competitive ?

    part of the puzzle - at least for me - is to learn to really ride and train well.... and for me - part of that is to learn to work with what i have and create the best that beastie can be.... it doesn't take a 50k pony to do that

    any good trainer will tell you - the trot can be made. no you cant make a Totilas out of a downhill pony - but you can, given good enough riding and training, get results that will score 7s in shows.

    it is hard work tho! and you need very good training. I have that pony with not so great trot.... but when he is working well - it is really amazing what he can do! and i am not that great of a rider it just takes work and a good trainer.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,238

    Default

    part of the puzzle - at least for me - is to learn to really ride and train well.... and for me - part of that is to learn to work with what i have and create the best that beastie can be.... it doesn't take a 50k pony to do that

    No it certainly does not. It also does not require a 50k pony to be competitive.
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2011
    Posts
    545

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by exvet View Post
    (snip)and then the price is $8500. He is 15 BUT/AND SOUND, very sound. He earned my silver medal for me (/snip)
    I'm honestly surprised by this. When I was shopping for my last purchased horse (ahem... not counting the free pony) I saw a welsh cob doing the PSG with decent scores (mid-60s) in his mid-teens advertised at ~$40K. I think he also may have been blind in one eye. However, this was in a fairly hot dressage area (comparatively speaking, anyway).

    I think we've had this discussion a couple times on this board. No, you don't need an ubermover to do well even regionally as an adult amateur in this sport-- depending on your level, to be honest; your Training Level classes will be much more competitive than 4th and up. Yes, you need a sound horse with three clean gaits (preferably athletic ones!) and a great brain to go up the levels.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goodpony View Post
    In theory I agree that the trot can be 'improved' but it takes a very good rider to improve 'pony gaited'. Where these 'pony-gaited' individuals tend to fall down is in the extensions/lengthenings and general tendency to fail to cover ground while staying more uphill. Better to start with something with a fair bit of natural 'elasticity'. I personally would tend to look for a cross-bred pony as they tend to be more 'competitive'---if that is the goal.
    I would have to agree, especially if competition was important. I have an Arab that is holding his own at the open shows, but it is a 6 year old Arab-Trakhner cross who is winning everything at second level and continues to move up the levels effortlessly. I think aside from the dreaded "pony trot", not all ponies are easy mounts to handle just because they are smaller. They can be every bit as explosive and tense as a horse. I think the OP's friend is actually in a very good horse buying position as she is petite enough for a pony but tall enough to handle 15". Even with a modest budget, she has a much greater pool from which to chose.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,238

    Default

    I'm honestly surprised by this. When I was shopping for my last purchased horse (ahem... not counting the free pony) I saw a welsh cob doing the PSG with decent scores (mid-60s) in his mid-teens advertised at ~$40K.

    And perhaps that is what they got or perhaps not. The one I just sent out on lease is priceless imo, but not so much in the eyes of others who see European sport bred as the only animals worthy of 5 figures. He struggles to get into the low 60s at PSG but he manages to do it. Much of it is the limitations of the rider, my first time through but he is also challenged by conformation. My first and foremost goal is a good home and someone who isn't just going to use and abuse him. AND above all else someone who understands the breed and the tendencies it has......I found an individual who actually fits that criteria, not so easy in this country. I think most would agree that it's a fair price and only after riding him understand what a gold mind he actually is. Unfortunately many who just look at him can't see past the hairy, twit-like cob.

    The Cardi's of the world and those of Madoc bloodlines being ridden, trained and shown by professionals may be able to garner that type of a price. Not something trained and shown solely by an amateur.

    and even more to the point of why what I own/train/breed are priced more for the middle class - I actually had someone ask me today if they could clip his legs (not the lessee) because he would just look sooooo much better and fit in (hee, hee, hee, hee, um yeah, trust me every time I bodyclipped him they still knew he wasn't a warmblood )
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2007
    Posts
    503

    Default

    There's also a matter of supply and demand. With a large horse both small people and large people can comfortably ride a large horse so there is twice the demand, and so a greater price tag. With a small horse only smaller people can comfortably ride the horse, less demand, lower price tag.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,676

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by narcisco View Post
    There's also a matter of supply and demand. With a large horse both small people and large people can comfortably ride a large horse so there is twice the demand, and so a greater price tag. With a small horse only smaller people can comfortably ride the horse, less demand, lower price tag.
    Bingo! With the exception of the ridiculously fancy imported ponies, there just isn't demand for dressage ponies compared to the 16hh+ horse, it's just the way it is. And most people just wont pay high prices for them knowing the demand just isn't there. Not at a high price. It's just how it is.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2009
    Location
    Northernish WI
    Posts
    117

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goodpony View Post
    In theory I agree that the trot can be 'improved' but it takes a very good rider to improve 'pony gaited'. Where these 'pony-gaited' individuals tend to fall down is in the extensions/lengthenings and general tendency to fail to cover ground while staying more uphill. Better to start with something with a fair bit of natural 'elasticity'. I personally would tend to look for a cross-bred pony as they tend to be more 'competitive'---if that is the goal.
    The real question is do you need this. Winning Dressage classes has never been my goal and while I looked for a pony that wouldn't embarrass me I really didn't want big gaits. I like to do all kinds of things with my ponies and big gaits are uncomfortable to ride on a long trail. My personal reason for doing Dressage is to improve the horse that I love and want to spend time with and have fun! Winning classes just doesn't matter to me personally.
    My little girl, Katai - 13.2 Haflinger/?
    and her blog



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2006
    Location
    Coastal New England
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JLR1 View Post
    I would have to agree, especially if competition was important. I have an Arab that is holding his own at the open shows, but it is a 6 year old Arab-Trakhner cross who is winning everything at second level and continues to move up the levels effortlessly. I think aside from the dreaded "pony trot", not all ponies are easy mounts to handle just because they are smaller. They can be every bit as explosive and tense as a horse. I think the OP's friend is actually in a very good horse buying position as she is petite enough for a pony but tall enough to handle 15". Even with a modest budget, she has a much greater pool from which to chose.
    I see that you're in Scottsdale... Is that 6 year old you're referring to a big, chromed-out, fancy Chestnut gelding by chance?



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by melody1 View Post
    I see that you're in Scottsdale... Is that 6 year old you're referring to a big, chromed-out, fancy Chestnut gelding by chance?
    Yes it is! Palladin out of Aul Magic and a Trak Mare.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2006
    Location
    Coastal New England
    Posts
    469

    Default

    He is very cool indeed! Laine is a friend of mine and I've shown his half brother.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Somewhere in the Midwest
    Posts
    2,097



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2006
    Location
    Coastal New England
    Posts
    469

    Default

    I knew a VERY neat Welsh X several years ago who had been started as a pony hunter and did not have the mind of a child's horse. As far as I understood, she was sold and sent to a dressage trainer, and here she is just months (weeks?) into her training showing a trot lengthening. What a spectacular little mare! Being a petite adult pony rider myself, I sure wish I'd been horse shopping before her potential was discovered.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2006
    Location
    Nor Cal
    Posts
    1,955

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by piccolopony View Post
    The real question is do you need this..
    JME but a horse/pony that finds the work easy will make a better long term partner than one who finds the job more challenging due to limitations of conformation or gait--this has nothing to do with competition but more along the lines of suitability for the purpose or "happy athlete". And no you dont need uber huge gaits to have either a happy or a competitive partner. The last amateur grand prix special I watched the horse that won was not the biggest or nearly the fanciest mover---but they put in the most accurate, well ridden correct test of the day. Both horse and rider looked happy and relaxed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,538

    Default

    i still say that what really matters is the training - the better the trainer , the less talented the horse or pony needs to be.

    a good trainer can bring out the best in any horse - be it a downhill pony or a fancy grp.

    as i watch my own "dressage challenged" pony blossom with decent training this is just confirmed.

    think about the type of horses the masters/greats of yore rode.... and look what they did with them!

    what matters is that the horse has heart and the ability to handle the hard work day in an day out, year after year, that is needed to progress. and that the rider/trainer can actually train

    you can teach a horse to lift its withers and be more uphill...... its much more difficult to teach a horse to want to work really really hard.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2004
    Posts
    7,538

    Default

    also, fwiw, some horses might find the lower level work easy - but the further you get up the levels the harder the work becomes.... and at some point the "character" of the horse will come into play.... can they stay happy and willing once the works gets difficult? because it will get hard.... will they stay happy to give it their all year after year?

    a fancy trot is just that, but good character and willingness to work is what really matters IMO



Similar Threads

  1. What's the going price range for a.....
    By Brigit in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Oct. 9, 2012, 07:10 PM
  2. Replies: 128
    Last Post: May. 14, 2012, 12:14 PM
  3. Average price range for a well-bred young sporthorse or pony
    By Crown Royal in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Mar. 12, 2012, 05:24 PM
  4. A lower-price-range dressage saddle for a h/j-er?
    By notforyouorme in forum Dressage
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jan. 12, 2010, 07:39 PM
  5. Childrens Hunter Pony Price Range
    By HowDoILook in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Jun. 1, 2009, 07:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness