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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2000
    Posts
    1,840

    Default Horse "slaps" RH to the ground

    I work with a 6-yr-old TB mare, who has (when I observe her) a habit of slapping the RH to the ground during the walk. The leg goes forward normally, but doesn't seem to fully extend and instead goes straight to the ground... the 'slapping.'

    Has anyone else seen/experienced this? Mare appears sound at the trot, but seems to have trouble travelling straight. I haven't worked with her for very long, so haven't yet investigated the issue.

    Thanks for any input!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2012
    Posts
    499

    Default

    Yup...my 23 year old OTTB does the same thing, but with LH...My lameness vet was sort of stumped, but was thinking hock arthritis was causing it (he never really flexed positive to any degree in that leg)



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2006
    Location
    New England
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    1,399

    Default

    Yep my soon to be 9 year old gelding does this same thing with his RH, though it's very subtle. My old vet said this is indicative of an old muscular injury. New vet said he has right stifle synovitis but he also swings this leg out slightly at the walk. He does of mild hock arthritis too (confirmed via rads). ETA - this is only seen at the walk, not at the trot.
    "And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse..." ~Revelation 19:11



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
    Posts
    3,771

    Default

    This can sometimes be an attribute of a syndrome called "stringhalt", has varying possilble treatments. From Australia, I have seen a study that indicates it has it's etiology in certain kinds of forage, meaning, I suppose, mineral deficiencies. I have never seen a US scientific paper or study on this though. Certainly it could be a number of possibilities from hocks to stifle and varying ligaments and tendons in between. I would find a competent vet to give you a better assessement.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2009
    Location
    Gladstone, Oregon
    Posts
    540

    Default

    Stringhalt.
    Quote Originally Posted by dizzywriter View Post
    My saddle fits perfectly well. It might be a little tight around the waist, but I take care of that with those spandex things.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,543



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2000
    Posts
    1,840

    Default

    Katy -- Yes, that is what it looks like, although not quite to same degree. Soooo.... what is that? Stringhalt, as noted in other posts?

    [Anyone else interested, it's the youtube linked in post #6]

    Thanks, everyone, for your input. It really helps.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,543

    Default

    As per Youtube comments, it is fibrotic myopathy. I didn't research the condition much, as she was just a lawn mower at my place. That mare was an old retired endurance horse. I was told this condition did not interfere with her job. She trotted just fine.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2010
    Posts
    692

    Default

    I was going to say fibrotic myopthy from the description. My mare has it. There's a surgery you can do for it, that helped her a lot, about 80% better, but this was years ago when she had it done. I understand these days there are other treatments. Check with your vet.

    PS. It just looks funny, but my mare has never been lame because of it. It only shows up at the walk; trot and canter are fine.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2004
    Location
    N. TX...just N.East of paradise...
    Posts
    2,028

    Default

    I have a gelding with a very obvious hamstring area old injury that has FM; he's got muscle tieup/wasting there. I really would love to be able to afford the surgery (he's a rescue) because he has a lovely walk otherwise. He's sound, just feels like a bit of flat tire when ridden. I'm not sure what back therapy he might need if I rode him more, longer trail rides. the inability to lengthen the back with that step must play some sort of havoc with something.
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2010
    Posts
    692

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melelio View Post
    I have a gelding with a very obvious hamstring area old injury that has FM; he's got muscle tieup/wasting there. I really would love to be able to afford the surgery (he's a rescue) because he has a lovely walk otherwise. He's sound, just feels like a bit of flat tire when ridden. I'm not sure what back therapy he might need if I rode him more, longer trail rides. the inability to lengthen the back with that step must play some sort of havoc with something.
    Is there a vet college near you? I took my girl to colorado state, they did it for $400. This was in 05.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2004
    Location
    Red Bank, NJ
    Posts
    1,658

    Default

    My horse has a mild version of the same thing in his RH. He's a 17YO OTTB. It's visible at a walk, and does not affect our fairly low-key workload. I've had vets, farriers, and chiropractors evaluate it.
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,665

    Default

    is this typically progressive/degenerative?
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2010
    Posts
    692

    Default

    The scar tissue has built up on my girl from the orignal wound and the surgery. She might be in a study for laser to see if that helps it. Otherwise, she's fine. A little more stiff, etc. But nothing major.



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